Cholesterol Levels Improving Among U.S. Kids

TUESDAY, May 21, 2019 -- Despite an epidemic of childhood obesity, the cholesterol levels of American kids have been improving over the past 20 years, a new study shows. Researchers found that since 1999, levels of " bad " LDL cholesterol among U.S....
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

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Right now the world is experiencing an epidemic that is projected to get much, much worse. It’s an epidemic of dementia, affecting 50 million people and millions more of their caregivers — staggering numbers that are projected to triple by 2050. The dementia crisis is such a massive worldwide issue that the World Health Organization (WHO) announced a strategic public health action plan, including compiling an organized database of quality dementia research and creating guidelines for the prevention of dementia. The guidelines have just been published, a 96-page document that is summarized here, as well as in th...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Alzheimer's Disease Brain and cognitive health Exercise and Fitness Healthy Aging Memory Nutrition Source Type: blogs
CONCLUSION: Cholesterol overloads not only trigger hepatic damage, but also affect the gallbladder significantly. PMID: 31104801 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Annals of Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Tags: Ann Hepatol Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: A large proportion of women experience several comorbidities, highlighting the need to address the chronic non-communicable disease epidemic in SA and to co-ordinate multidisciplinary primary-, secondary- and tertiary-level care in the country's complex healthcare system for better outcome. PMID: 31084693 [PubMed - in process]
Source: South African Medical Journal - Category: African Health Tags: S Afr Med J Source Type: research
AbstractBackgroundMorbid obesity is a worldwide epidemic and is increasingly treated by bariatric surgery. Fatty liver is a common finding; almost half of all patients with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis develop steatohepatitis. Bariatric surgery improves steatohepatitis documented by liver biopsy and single voxel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques.ObjectiveTo investigate changes before and after bariatric surgery using whole organ MRI quantification of liver, visceral, and subcutaneous fat.SettingUniversity of Basel Hospital and St. Clara Research Ltd, Basel, Switzerland.MethodsSixteen morbidly obese patients were...
Source: Obesity Surgery - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
In conclusion, the impaired in situ activity of RyR2 may also account for the poor overall cardiac outcome reported in MetS patients; hence, the SERCA pump and RyR2 are both attractive potential targets for future therapies. Introduction Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a cluster of biochemical and physiological risk factors for cardiovascular disease and diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2); it represents a severe public health problem around the world (Alberti et al., 2009). Risk factors for MetS include obesity (particularly central obesity), elevated triglyceride (TG) levels, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
Ali Mahzari1, Songpei Li1, Xiu Zhou1,2, Dongli Li2, Sherouk Fouda1, Majid Alhomrani1, Wala Alzahrani1, Stephen R. Robinson1 and Ji-Ming Ye1,2* 1Lipid Biology and Metabolic Disease Laboratory, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia 2School of Biotechnology and Health Sciences, Wuyi University, Jiangmen, China The present study investigated the effects of matrine on non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) in mice induced by a methionine choline-deficient (MCD) diet and the mechanism involved. The study was performed in C57B/6J mice fed a MCD diet for 6 weeks to induce NAS...
Source: Frontiers in Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
Mildren Porchas-Quijada1, Zyanya Reyes-Castillo1*, José Francisco Muñoz-Valle2, Sergio Durán-Barragán3,4, Virginia Aguilera-Cervantes1, Antonio López-Espinoza1, Mónica Vázquez-Del Mercado4, Mónica Navarro-Meza1 and Patricia López-Uriarte1 1Instituto de Investigaciones en Comportamiento Alimentario y Nutrición, Centro Universitario del Sur, Universidad de Guadalajara, Ciudad Guzmán, Mexico 2Instituto de Investigaciones en Ciencias Biomédicas, Centro Universitario de Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad de Guadalajara, Guadalajara, Mexic...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Dan Hu1†, Meijin Zhang2†, Hejun Zhang1, Yan Xia1, Jinxiu Lin2, Xiongwei Zheng1, Feng Peng2* and Wenquan Niu3* 1Department of Pathology, Fujian Cancer Hospital &Fujian Medical University Cancer Hospital, Fuzhou, China 2Department of Cardiology, First Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou, China 3Institute of Clinical Medical Sciences, China-Japan Friendship Hospital, Beijing, China Background and Objectives: Growing evidence indicates that metabolic syndrome confers a differential risk for the development and progression of many types of cancer, especially in the digestive tr...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Shafqat Ahmad1,2,3*, Syeda Sadia Fatima4, Gull Rukh5 and Caren E. Smith6 1Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Epidemiology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden 2Preventive Medicine Division, Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, United States 3Department of Nutrition, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, United States 4Department of Biological and Biomedical Sciences, Aga Khan University, Karachi, Pakistan 5Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden 6Nutrition and Genomics Laboratory, Jean Mayer U. S. Depa...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
The headlines are once again filled with advice to reduce egg and cholesterol consumption based on a study that found an association of egg and cholesterol consumption with increased risk for cardiovascular events. Sounds scary and persuasive, doesn’t it? After all, nearly 30,000 people were tracked over 17 years and the authors authoritatively declare that this proves that eggs and cholesterol are risk factors for heart disease. There are several problems with this assessment. It is emblematic of the studies that confuse people, yield wildly conflicting conclusions, are used to craft absurd and ineffective dietary g...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: News & Updates cholesterol eggs grain-free saturated fat undoctored wheat belly Source Type: blogs
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