Walking and strength training may decrease the risk of dying from liver disease

(Digestive Disease Week) Physical activity, including walking and muscle-strengthening activities, were associated with significantly reduced risk of cirrhosis-related death, according to research presented at Digestive Disease Week ® (DDW) 2019. Chronic liver disease is increasing, partly due to the obesity epidemic, and currently there are no guidelines for the optimal type of exercise for the prevention of cirrhosis-related mortality.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

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Publication date: Available online 16 May 2019Source: Journal of Clinical and Experimental HepatologyAuthor(s): Naga S. Samji, Rajanshu Verma, Sanjaya K. SatapathyThe incidence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is continuing to rise worldwide, and it is estimated that this disquieting trend will continue for another 10–15 years before prevalence begins to decrease. NAFLD is the hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome. As obesity, diabetes, and other lifestyle-related diseases continue to rise, the spectrum of NAFLD, e.g., nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, liver fibrosis, liver cirrhosis, liver-related morbi...
Source: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 16 May 2019Source: Journal of Clinical and Experimental HepatologyAuthor(s): Naga Swetha Samji, Rajanshu Verma, Sanjaya K. SatapathyAbstractThe incidence of NAFLD is continuing to rise worldwide and it is estimated that this disquieting trend will continue for another 10-15 years before prevalence begins to decrease. NAFLD is the hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome. As obesity, diabetes and other life style related diseases continue to rise, the spectrum of NAFLD e.g., NASH (nonalcoholic steatohepatitis), liver fibrosis, liver cirrhosis, liver related morbidity and mortality will ...
Source: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research
Ali Mahzari1, Songpei Li1, Xiu Zhou1,2, Dongli Li2, Sherouk Fouda1, Majid Alhomrani1, Wala Alzahrani1, Stephen R. Robinson1 and Ji-Ming Ye1,2* 1Lipid Biology and Metabolic Disease Laboratory, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia 2School of Biotechnology and Health Sciences, Wuyi University, Jiangmen, China The present study investigated the effects of matrine on non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) in mice induced by a methionine choline-deficient (MCD) diet and the mechanism involved. The study was performed in C57B/6J mice fed a MCD diet for 6 weeks to induce NAS...
Source: Frontiers in Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
Guangwen Luo1†, Bailiang Li1†, Cailu Yang2†, Yutang Wang1, Xin Bian1, Wan Li1, Fei Liu1 and Guicheng Huo1* 1Key Laboratory of Dairy Science, Ministry of Education, College of Food Science, Northeast Agricultural University, Harbin, China 2Department of Ultrasound, Maternal and Child Health Hospital of Dapeng New District, Shenzhen, China Modulating gut microbiota to promote host health is well recognized. Therefore, people consume dietary products containing traditional probiotics in wishing to improve their health, and they need more research-based advices on how to select products with sui...
Source: Frontiers in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
Abstract Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) makes up 75%-85% of all primary liver cancers and is the fourth most common cause of cancer related death worldwide. Chronic liver disease is the most significant risk factor for HCC with 80%-90% of new cases occurring in the background of cirrhosis. Studies have shown that early diagnosis of HCC through surveillance programs improve prognosis and availability of curative therapies. All patients with cirrhosis and high-risk hepatitis B patients are at risk for HCC and should undergo surveillance. The recommended surveillance modality is abdominal ultrasound (US) given that i...
Source: World Journal of Gastroenterology : WJG - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: World J Gastroenterol Source Type: research
AbstractPurpose of ReviewWe sought to review the contemporary epidemiology of cirrhosis, focusing on the relative burden of the most common chronic liver diseases.Recent FindingsThe key findings in the review highlight the increasing prevalence and impact of alcohol-related liver disease, particularly among young people, and the epidemic of nonalcoholic fatty liver commensurate with rising rates of obesity. We also contrast recent advances in the care of persons with hepatitis C with the lamentable rise in new infections associated with intravenous drug use. Finally, we highlight the impact of both conventional complicatio...
Source: Current Treatment Options in Gastroenterology - Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research
The obesity epidemic is closely associated with the rising prevalence and severity of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD): obesity has been linked not only with simple steatosis (SS), but also with advanced disease, i.e., nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), NASH-related cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). As a consequence, apart from increasing all-cause mortality, obesity seems to increase liver-specific mortality in NAFLD patients. Given the lack of approved pharmacological interventions for NAFLD, targeting obesity is a rational option for its management.
Source: Metabolism - Clinical and Experimental - Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Source Type: research
As the epidemics of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus increase worldwide, the prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is increasing proportionately. The subtype of NAFLD which can be characterized as non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a potentially progressive liver disease that can lead to cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, liver transplantation, and death; it is associated with extrahepatic manifestations such as chronic kidney disease cardiovascular disease and sleep apnea.
Source: Journal of Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Public Health Source Type: research
As the epidemics of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus increase worldwide, the prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is increasing proportionately. The subtype of NAFLD which can be characterised as non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a potentially progressive liver disease that can lead to cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, liver transplantation, and death. NAFLD is also associated with extrahepatic manifestations such as chronic kidney disease, cardiovascular disease and sleep apnoea.
Source: Journal of Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Public Health Source Type: research
The burden associated with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is becoming a major problem for health systems worldwide.1 As part of the metabolic syndrome, NAFLD prevalence is increasing in parallel with the epidemics of obesity and diabetes;2 although in most cases NAFLD remains a non-progressive disease, in some cases non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and progressive fibrosis may occur, finally progressing to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma.3 Thus, the costs associated with liver disease of metabolic origin and its complications are likely to soon outweigh the costs of liver diseases of viral origin.
Source: Journal of Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Research Article Source Type: research
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