3D MRI captures changes to fetal head during birth

Researchers from France have used 3D MRI to visualize changes to the shape...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: MRI links blood flow to brain development in preterm babies Machine learning predicts pregnancies with fetal growth restriction 3D MRI technique depicts postablation prostate changes 3D models put pediatric hearts in surgeons' hands New high-res 3D MRI map aids surgeons
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - Category: Radiology Source Type: news

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Mind-reading exoskeletons, digital tattoos, 3D printed drugs, RFID implants for recreational purposes: mindblowing innovations come to medicine and healthcare almost every single day. We shortlisted some of the greatest ideas and developments that could give us a glimpse into the future of medicine, but we found so many that we had trouble fitting them into one article. Here are the first ten spectacular medical innovations to watch for. 1) Mixed reality opens new ways for medical education Augmented, virtual, and mixed reality are all technologies opening new worlds for the human senses. While the difference between...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Future of Medicine 3d printing artificial food brain-computer interface cyborg digital tattoos drug development exoskeleton gamification google glass health insurance Healthcare Innovation List Medical education medical techn Source Type: blogs
Multivitamins, drugs, gene therapies, human skin, heart, eyeballs, kidneys, entire dead bodies – everything comes with a price tag. Putting aside the moral questions of why and how come that the capitalist market priced even our body parts and health, we asked the question of how much is life worth: what is the maximum that you would/should pay for a life-saving drug? How high is too high a cost if a drug can save 200-300 babies a year from debilitating illness or death? And ultimately, does the pricing of new technologies, especially gene therapies, enable to fulfill their promise? There’s a price for ever...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Bioethics Biotechnology Future of Pharma Genomics cost daraprim drug drug price Gene gene therapy genetics insulin life medication pricing policy rare disease rare disorder Source Type: blogs
What if you could have a heat-map vision to search through an abandoned terrain? What if you could filter out unpleasant odors of urban decay every now and then? Can you imagine hearing ultrasounds better than bats? And what about lifting 20 tons or having a third, bionic arm? With the rapid advancement of technologies, the future of healthcare might not just be about being healthy, but even augmenting our bodies and “upgrading” ourselves. Where would you draw the line between being a human and a cyborg? Superhuman traits in sight: perceiving colors as sounds The wish for a perfect human body with enhance...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Biotechnology Cyborgization Health Sensors & Trackers artificial brain-computer interface digital tattoo exoskeleton future Healthcare implant Innovation Medicine Source Type: blogs
The baby's infectious laughter has melted hearts across the country
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Instead of mind-boggling inventions, 2018 was the year when national governments, as well as healthcare regulators, started to embrace digital health technologies at scale. The year when Google, Amazon, Apple or Microsoft competed head-to-head for the biggest chunks on the healthcare market, and when the buzzword of the year award went to the blockchain. Here’s our guide to the top digital health stories from last year. 2018: Under the spell of cosmos and microcosmos Every year, The Medical Futurist team sits down and collects the top stories of the past 12 months in healthcare. We put the novelties under the microsc...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Business Future of Medicine Medical Professionals Patients Policy Makers Researchers Top Lists 2018 AI artificial intelligence artificial pancreas blockchain chatbot CRISPR deep learning diabetes digital health digital he Source Type: blogs
Credit: UNICEFBy Dr Chewe LuoAMSTERDAM, Jul 27 2018 (IPS)As the 22nd International AIDS Conference wraps up in Amsterdam, I can’t help but reflect on how far we have come on this journey with the AIDS epidemic. When I first qualified as a pediatrician in Zambia some 30 years ago, Southern Africa was only just awakening to the magnitude of the AIDS crisis starting to play out in the region. Some governments famously refused to acknowledge the severity of the epidemic and questioned even the existence of HIV and its connection to AIDS.Zambia had its moment of shocked awareness when the 30 year-old son of President Kenn...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Africa Development & Aid Editors' Choice Education Featured Headlines Health Population Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Women's Health Source Type: news
[Nairobi News] Actress Jacky Nyaminde, popularly known as Wilbroda, has given a heart wrenching narration of how her HIV positive nanny used to breastfeed her baby to soothe him.
Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news
U.S. life expectancy has decreased for the second year in a row, and an editorial in the BMJ points to three contributing factors: drugs, alcohol and suicides, particularly among middle-age white Americans and those living in rural communities. The authors of the paper paint a bleak picture of the problems facing much of the United States today, but the authors say that policies that bolster the middle-class can help reverse the trend. The recent drop in life expectancy is alarming, the editorial states, “because life expectancy has risen for much of the past century in developed countries, including in the U.S.&rdqu...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime public health Source Type: news
January 19, 2018It ’s notallbad news.When we set out to compile our annual list of global health issues to watch this year, it seemed like all bad news. And true, that ’s often what we deal with in global health—the problems that need tackling, the suffering we can help alleviate.But then stories and columns likethis one cheer us up. They remind us that no matter how complicated and frustrating our work may get, fighting back against poverty and inequality works.There are and always will be global health challenges to face. But there ’s boundless hope, too. And a field full of determined health work...
Source: IntraHealth International - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Source Type: news
Discussions with Physicians) online on behalf of Kowa Pharmaceuticals America, Inc., within the United States from July 7- August 4, 2017, among 5,014 U.S. adults aged 45 or older, who have been diagnosed with high cholesterol, and have ever used a statin to treat high cholesterol. This online survey is not based on a probability sample and therefore no estimate of theoretical sampling error can be calculated. For complete survey methodology, including weighting variables, please contact Erin Bittner at W2O Group, 212-301-7226. Sources:   https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/articles/statin-medications-heart-di...
Source: Embrace Your Heart Wellness Initiative - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Award Winning Blog Source Type: blogs
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