Vaccination status of resident pediatricians and the potential risk for their patients - a cross-sectional questionnaire study in pediatric practices in Vienna

Pediatricians are advised by the Austrian ministry of health to be vaccinated against diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, poliomyelitis, measles, mumps, rubella, varicella, hepatitis A, hepatitis B, meningococcus ...
Source: BMC Pediatrics - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Research article Source Type: research

Related Links:

Alex Nowrasteh andAndrew C. ForresterThe international spread of the SARS ‐​CoV‐​2 virus that causes the disease COVID-19 has prompted many governments to close their borders. Immigration policy plays an important role in limiting the international spread of contagious diseases.Prior to the COVID-19 crisis,several commentators were concerned that immigrants – especially illegal immigrants – were spreading serious diseases in the United States. This blog post is the first in a series to answer the question of whether immigrants spread serious notifiable diseases other than COVID-19 in the ...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - Category: American Health Authors: Source Type: blogs
In conclusion, European countries now have more comprehensive national vaccination programs for HCP, however there are still gaps. Given the recent large outbreaks of vaccine-preventable diseases in Europe and the occupational risk for HCP, vaccination policies need to be expanded and strengthened in several European countries. Overall, vaccination policies for HCP in Europe should be periodically re-evaluated in order to provide optimal protection against vaccine-preventable diseases and infection control within healthcare facilities for HCP and patients. PMID: 31623916 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Vaccine - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Vaccine Source Type: research
ConclusionsConsiderable vaccination delay should be addressed within the vaccine hesitancy spectrum. Delays may induce susceptibility to vaccine-preventable disease outbreaks; tailored programmes to improve timeliness are required. PMID: 30755293 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Euro Surveill - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Euro Surveill Source Type: research
Discussion Vaccines are a mainstay of infectious disease prevention and health promotion. Infants, children and adults benefit from vaccines the most when they are given on the recommended schedules. However there are times when this is not possible as children come to the physician a little early, or a little late, or had unavailable records and so received addition vaccine, etc. There are many questions that arise because of these timing issues such as the one above. Standard vaccine schedules can be reviewed here. Commonly administered vaccines includes: Live-attenuated vaccines Cholera Measles, mumps, rubella (MMR ...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news
Authors: D'Amelio E, Salemi S, D'Amelio R Abstract A brief history of vaccination is presented since the Jenner's observation, through the first golden age of vaccinology (from Pasteur's era to 1938), the second golden age (from 1940 to 1970), until the current period. In the first golden age, live, such as Bacille Calmette Guérin (BCG), and yellow fever, inactivated, such as typhoid, cholera, plague, and influenza, and subunit vaccines, such as tetanus and diphtheria toxoids, have been developed. In the second golden age, the cell culture technology enabled polio, measles, mumps, and rubella vaccines be dev...
Source: International Reviews of Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: Int Rev Immunol Source Type: research
Conclusion: There are variations in vaccination practice across Europe. Children with CKD, those undergoing dialysis, and transplant candidates should receive age-appropriate vaccinations before RTx as well as before the transition to adult nephrology clinics and antibody levels should be monitored to evaluate the immunization status before and after RTx.Nephron
Source: Nephron - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
Follow me on Twitter @drClaire Imagine there was a simple treatment that could be given to babies and toddlers that was not only remarkably effective in preventing illness, but also inexpensive. And imagine that this treatment was not only inexpensive, but also lowered overall health care costs. There’s no need to imagine; the treatment exists. It’s called immunization. It’s National Infant Immunization Week, a time to recognize and celebrate immunization. It’s during infancy that we give the most vaccines, but the benefits extend far beyond infancy and beyond those babies. The protection lasts for ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Children's Health Health policy Infectious diseases Managing your health care Parenting Prevention Vaccines Source Type: blogs
Anti-infectious human vaccination in historical perspective. Int Rev Immunol. 2015 Nov 25;:1-32 Authors: D'Amelio E, Salemi S, D'Amelio R Abstract A brief history of vaccination is presented since the Jenner's observation, through the first golden age of vaccinology (from Pasteur's era to 1938), the second golden age (from 1940 to 1970), until the current period. In the first golden age, live, such as Bacille Calmette Guérin (BCG), and yellow fever, inactivated, such as typhoid, cholera, plague, and influenza, and subunit vaccines, such as tetanus and diphtheria toxoids, have been deve...
Source: International Reviews of Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: Int Rev Immunol Source Type: research
Julia R. Barrett, MS, ELS, a Madison, WI–based science writer and editor, is a member of the National Association of Science Writers and the Board of Editors in the Life Sciences. About This Article open Citation: Barrett JR. 2015. Pediatric vaccines and neurodevelopment: primate study finds no adverse behavioral effects. Environ Health Perspect 123:A156; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.123-A156 News Topics: Infectious Disease, Mental Health, Mercury, Neurologic Health Published: 1 June 2015 PDF Version (320 KB) Related EHP Article Examination of the Safety of Pediatric Vaccine Schedules in a Non-Human ...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Featured News Science Selection Infectious Disease June 2015 Mental Health Mercury Neurologic Health Source Type: research
The University of California will require incoming students to be screened for tuberculosis and vaccinated for measles, mumps, rubella, chicken pox, meningococcus, tetanus and whooping cough under a plan set to take effect in 2017. Currently, the UC system only requires students to be vaccinated against hepatitis B, though several campuses have additional requirements. The plan — designed to help protect the health of students and campus communities — has been in the works for a year. But the need is more pressing than ever, given the current multistate measles outbreak and the re-emergence of other vaccine-pre...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news
More News: Austria Health | Diphtheria | Hepatitis | Hepatitis A | Hepatitis B | Hepatitis Vaccine | Measles | Measles Vaccine | Men | Mumps | Mumps Vaccine | Pediatrics | Polio | Polio Vaccine | Rubella | Rubella Vaccine | Study | Tetanus | Tetanus Diptheria Pertussis Vaccine Tdap,Dtap,Dpt | Tetanus Vaccine | Vaccines | Whooping Cough (Pertussis) Vaccine