Book Review: Differently Wired: Raising an Exceptional Child

A trip down a bookstore aisle will reveal that there are as many different approaches to parenting as there are books to choose from. For every approach, there is an expert and a book to go along with it. In this modern age, there is probably a blog, too. The common theme between all these books is a problem to fix, a habit to address, or an issue to figure out. Then there is Differently Wired: Raising an Exceptional Child in a Conventional World, a book as differently wired as the children it refers to. While it will be on the same shelf as a book about dealing with a “problem child,” Differently Wired isn’t a book about problem children — it’s about exceptional children, the ones wired a little differently than the rest, and how to raise them well. This distinction is more than semantics. It provides a core basis for a book that, in this reviewer’s opinion, has the potential to empower a very stifled, frustrated group of parents and their exceptional kids. Author Deborah Reber pulls on her real life experience as a mom of her own exceptional child and as founder of TiLT Parenting to open a dialogue with readers about “differently wired” child — the one with ADHD, autism, giftedness, anxiety, and more. In a refreshing, down-to-earth, and highly researched approach, Reber’s book is the equivalent of a long coffee chat with a box of tissues, encouragement, and useful tools for parents who are at their wit’s end....
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Autism / Asperger's Book Reviews Caregivers Children and Teens Disabilities Disorders Family General Motivation and Inspiration Parenting Pediatrics for Parents Personal Stories Psychology School Issues Self-Help Stress Stu Source Type: news

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