Phospholipase C-related catalytically inactive protein: A novel signaling molecule for modulating fat metabolism and energy expenditure

ConclusionWe propose PRIP as a new therapeutic target for controlling obesity or developing novel anti-obesity drugs.
Source: Journal of Oral Biosciences - Category: Biomedical Science Source Type: research

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CONCLUSION: This study confirmed published results that labour progresses more slowly as maternal BMI increases. The study was performed in a centre with a specialized BMI pregnancy clinic; thus weight gain adherence, awareness of labour differences, and patient counselling may have contributed to low Caesarean section rates. Obstetric care providers should consider differences in maternal BMI in labour progression before undertaking a potentially premature Caesarean birth, especially in primiparas. PMID: 31324481 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Canada : JOGC - Category: OBGYN Tags: J Obstet Gynaecol Can Source Type: research
Publication date: October 2019Source: Fish &Shellfish Immunology, Volume 93Author(s): Che-Chun Yi, Chun-Hung Liu, Kuo-Pin Chuang, Yi-Ting Chang, Shao-Yang HuAbstractThe use of probiotics as alternatives to antibiotics for disease control is a relatively eco-friendly approach in aquaculture; hence, studies isolating and assessing the benefit of potential probiotics to fish farming are common. The zebrafish is an excellent model system for validating beneficial functions of potential probiotics before their practical application in aquaculture. Here, a potentially probiotic Chromobacterium aquaticum was isolated from lak...
Source: Fish and Shellfish Immunology - Category: Biology Source Type: research
(CNN) — Whether you eat breakfast might be linked with your risk of dying early from cardiovascular disease, according to a new study. Skipping breakfast was significantly associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular-related death, especially stroke-related death, in the study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology on Monday. After a person’s age, sex, race, socioeconomic status, diet, lifestyle, body mass index and disease status were taken into account, the study found that those who never had breakfast had a 87% higher risk of cardiovascular mortality compared with people who h...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News CNN Heart Disease Source Type: news
Conclusion Activation of the Nrf2-dependent antioxidant system plays an important role in cell defense against oxidative stress damage, whereas the insufficiency of the Nrf2 system is associated with multiple aspects of the genesis and progression of metabolic diseases, posing a great risk to the cardiovascular system (Figure 1). The systemic increase of Nrf2 activity by several activators may be beneficial in the treatment of metabolic diseases. In addition, selective upregulation of Nrf2 genes may represent a potential therapy in obesity, diabetes and atherosclerosis. Looking to the future, experimental research that el...
Source: Frontiers in Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Conclusion This large, valuable study confirms that – as has long been thought – an increased BMI is linked with an increased risk of heart disease. It shows that people with an obese BMI had a higher risk of heart disease, even if they didn't have other risk factors like high cholesterol and high blood pressure, proving that body fat is an independent risk factor. That said, this study does have some limitations. For example, definitions of being metabolically unhealthy aren't entirely consistent with other definitions of metabolic syndrome. This was also only assessed at the start of the study, and risk fac...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Obesity Source Type: news
In conclusion, documentation is important, a critical part of advocacy and the development process at the larger scale. It isn't just words, but rather a vital structural flow of information from one part of the larger community to another, necessary to sustain progress in any complex field. We would all do well to remember this - and to see that building this documentation is an activity in which we can all pitch in to help. Evidence Suggests that, at Least in Earlier Stages, Alzheimer's Disease Blocks Rather than Destroys Memories https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2017/07/evidence-suggests-that-at-least-in-ea...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
In this study, researchers analysed data of millions of British patients between 1995 and 2015 to see if this claim held true. They tracked people who were obese at the start of the study, defined as people with a body mass index (BMI) of 30 or more, who had no evidence of heart disease, high blood pressure, high cholesterol or diabetes at this point. They found these people who were obese but "metabolically healthy" were at higher risk of developing heart disease, strokes and heart failure than people of normal weight. No such thing as 'fat but fit', major study finds Several studies in the pas...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
In this study, researchers analysed data of millions of British patients between 1995 and 2015 to see if this claim held true. They tracked people who were obese at the start of the study, defined as people with a body mass index (BMI) of 30 or more, who had no evidence of heart disease, high blood pressure, high cholesterol or diabetes at this point. They found these people who were obese but "metabolically healthy" were at higher risk of developing heart disease, strokes and heart failure than people of normal weight. No such thing as 'fat but fit', major study finds Several studies in the pas...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs
Abstract As nutrition-related chronic diseases have become more and more frequent, the importance of dietary prevention has also increased. Dietary fat plays a major role in human nutrition, and modification of fat and/or fatty acid intake could have a preventive potential. The aim of the guideline of the German Nutrition Society (DGE) was to systematically evaluate the evidence for the prevention of the widespread diseases obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, dyslipoproteinaemia, hypertension, metabolic syndrome, coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke, and cancer through the intake of fat or fatty acids. The main res...
Source: Diabetes Metab - Category: Endocrinology Authors: Tags: Ann Nutr Metab Source Type: research
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