Trans Women Have Raised Odds of Breast Cancer, But Risk Still Small: Study

WEDNESDAY, May 15, 2019 -- Transgender women on gender-confirming hormone therapy have increased odds of breast cancer, but the overall risk is low and not as high as it is for the general female population, a new study finds. Trans women are those...
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

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Publication date: Available online 22 June 2019Source: Journal of Geriatric OncologyAuthor(s): Etienne Brain, Philippe Caillet, Nienke de Glas, Laura Biganzoli, Karis Cheng, Lissandra Dal Lago, Hans WildiersAbstractHER2-positive (HER2+) breast cancer (BC) affects older women nearly as frequently as younger ones. Many older patients have cardiovascular comorbidity and risk greater toxicity from therapy. Treatment therefore requires careful consideration, especially since trials include few patients over 65 and so provide limited guidance. A multidisciplinary task force of the International Society of Geriatric Oncology cond...
Source: Journal of Geriatric Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Conclusion: There does not exist an optimal treatment sequence for hormone-receptor-positive, her2-negative advanced breast cancer. However, after review of literature, a reasonable approach may be starting with tamoxifen, aromatase inhibitors or fulvestrant in absence of visceral crisis, in addition to ensuring adequate ovarian function suppression in pre/peri-menopausal women. Aromatase inhibitors and fulvestrant seem to be superior. Resistance to such agents is increasing, mostly attributed to genetic and molecular changes. Multiple modalities are addressed to overcome such resistance including use of CKD4/6 inhibitors,...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
This study is a multi ‐institutional validation of that algorithmic model in 620 additional estrogen receptor positive breast cancer cases, with outcome data on 310 cases, named in this study as the Rochester Modified Magee algorithm (RoMMa). RoMMa correctly predicted 85% (140/164) and 100% (17/17) of cases to have a low‐ or high‐risk ODX recurrence score, respectively, consistent with the original publication. Applying our own risk stratification criteria, in patients who received appropriate hormonal therapy, only one of the 45 (2.0%) patients classified as low risk by our original algorithm have been ass...
Source: Cancer Medicine - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: ORIGINAL RESEARCH Source Type: research
Cancer Network spoke with Debu Tripathy, MD, Chair of Breast Medical Oncology at MD Anderson Cancer Center, on how ribociclib plus hormone therapy extends survival for patients with premenopausal advanced HR-positive breast cancer.
Source: CancerNetwork - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Source Type: news
In this study we performed disease-progression modeling in postmenopausal patients with early breast cancer who had received 5 years of postoperative hormone therapy. Clinical data from postmenopausal patients who had received postoperative hormonal therapy and met the predefined selection criteria were retrospectively collected in an anonymized way. Disease-progression modeling and simulations were performed using NONMEM version 7.42. A first-order deterioration model with a combination of a symptomatic model (when a drug effect provides a transient bad effect by offsetting the severity of the disease) and a disease-modif...
Source: Clinical Genitourinary Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: J Clin Pharmacol Source Type: research
Clinical calculator could spare breast cancer patients 5 years of unnecessary hormone therapy.Medscape News UK
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news
(MediaSource) A UCLA-led study has found that using a drug called ribociclib in combination with a common hormone therapy may help premenopausal women with the most common type of breast cancer live longer than if they only receive the hormone therapy.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
Combining ribociclib with hormone therapy found to cut risk of death by up to a thirdYounger women with breast cancer have been given the hope of living longer after what is described as “one of the greatest advances in breast cancer research in recent decades”.Adding ribociclib, a targeted drug that disrupts cancer cells, to standard hormone therapy was found to boost survival among premenopausal patients who have an advanced form of the disease.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Breast cancer Medical research Drugs Health Society NHS Science UK news World news Source Type: news
A UCLA-led study has found that using a drug called ribociclib in combination with a common hormone therapy may help premenopausal women with the most common type of breast cancer live longer than if they only receive the hormone therapy.Ribociclib is considered a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor that works by blocking the activity of proteins called cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 enzymes, which promote cell division and cancer growth.The study involved 672 women aged 25 to 59 when the study began who had advanced hormone-receptor positive/HER2- breast cancer. Seventy percent of the women who took the combination therapy wer...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news
SATURDAY, June 1, 2019 -- Adding a newer drug to standard hormone therapy lengthens the lives of younger women with advanced breast cancer, a new trial has found. The drug, called Kisqali (ribociclib), is already approved for treating such patients...
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - Category: General Medicine Source Type: news
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