Livebirth After Uterus Transplantation From a Deceased Donor in a Recipient With Uterine Infertility

(Abstracted from Lancet 2018;392:2697–2704) Infertility is common and affects about 10% to 15% of couples. In such couples, 1 in 500 women has infertility due to uterine causes, with uterine agenesis (Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser [MRKH] syndrome), or due to hysterectomy, malformation, or the sequelae of infection or surgery.
Source: Obstetrical and Gynecological Survey - Category: OBGYN Tags: OBSTETRICS: ETHICS, MEDICOLEGAL ISSUES, AND PUBLIC POLICY Source Type: research

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Publication date: May–June 2019Source: Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology, Volume 26, Issue 4Author(s): Shailesh Puntambekar, Seema Puntambekar, Milind Telang, Pankaj Kulkarni, Shardul Date, Mangesh Panse, Ravindra Sathe, Nikhil Agarkhedkar, Neeta Warty, Sandesh Kade, Manoj Manchekar, Mihir Chitale, Hirav Parekh, Kajal Parikh, Mehul Mehta, Bhushan Kinholkar, Joy Shankar Jana, Avinash Pare, Shailendra Kanade, Abhay SadreAbstractStudy ObjectiveTo evaluate 2 cases of uterine transplant surgery that used utero-ovarian veins as outflow channels, internal iliac arteries for perfusion, and the organ harvest surgery pe...
Source: Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
Authors: Zaami S, Di Luca A, Marinelli E Abstract Women suffering from Uterine Factor Infertility (UFI) arising from congenital conditions (e.g., Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser syndrome) or hysterectomy can fulfill their wish to achieve motherhood only by resorting to surrogacy, which is, however, banned in most countries. Medical research has long been looking into uterus transplant (UTx), which may constitute a valuable alternative for such patients. Following decades of animal testing and clinical trials, several successful pregnancies have been carried to term. Yet UTx is still to be considered as an experimental pro...
Source: European Review for Medical and Pharmacological Sciences - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Tags: Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci Source Type: research
On an afternoon in November, a couple hosted a birthday party for their 1-year-old son. As family and friends gathered around the child to sing “Happy Birthday,” his parents addressed a milestone that reached well beyond the room. “It was emotional,” recalls the mother. “It took a lot more than a nine-month pregnancy to get him, and we wouldn’t be where we are without everyone’s support.” Many parents will tell you their child is miraculous. But the mere existence of this particular boy, who just a month earlier had taken his first steps, brings the miracle somehow closer to ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized fertility Research Source Type: news
Publication date: Available online 29 December 2018Source: Journal of Minimally Invasive GynecologyAuthor(s): Shailesh Puntambekar, Seema Puntambekar, Milind Telang, Pankaj Kulkarni, Shardul Date, Mangesh Panse, Ravindra Sathe, Nikhil Agarkhedkar, Neeta Warty, Sandesh Kade, Manoj Manchekar, Mihir Chitale, Hirav Parekh, Kajal Parikh, Mehul Mehta, Bhushan Kinholkar, Joy Shankar Jana, Avinash Pare, Shailendra Kanade, Abhay SadreABSTRACTStudy objectiveTo evaluate 2 cases of uterine transplant surgery that used utero-ovarian veins as outflow channels, internal iliac arteries for perfusion, and the organ harvest surgery being pe...
Source: Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 21 December 2018Source: Best Practice &Research Clinical Obstetrics &GynaecologyAuthor(s): Mats Brännström, Pernilla Dahm-KählerAbstractAbsolute uterine factor infertility (AUFI), with uterine absence or presence of a non-functional uterus, was considered untreatable until 2014, when the first child was born after transplantation of a uterus from a postmenopausal woman to a woman of fertile age who was born with no uterus, as part of the MRKH syndrome. Concerning gynaecological cancer, AUFI may occur after hysterectomy for malignancy or after surgery/radiation that ...
Source: Best Practice and Research Clinical Obstetrics and Gynaecology - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
We describe, to our knowledge, the first case worldwide of livebirth following uterine transplantation from a deceased donor in a patient with MRKH syndrome. The results establish proof-of-concept for treating uterine infertility by transplantation from a deceased donor, opening a path to healthy pregnancy for all women with uterine factor infertility, without need of living donors or live donor surgery.FundingFundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo and Hospital das Clínicas, University of São Paulo, Brazil.
Source: The Lancet - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
The world’s first baby born by a uterus transplant from a deceased donor is healthy and nearing her first birthday, according to a new case study published Tuesday in the Lancet. Uterus transplants have become more common in recent years, resulting in 11 live births around the world. But all of the other successful deliveries so far have been made possible by living donors — often women who opt to donate their uterus to a close friend or family member without one. The birth resulting from the case detailed in the Lancet, which took place at Brazil’s Hospital das Cli╠ünicas last December, is both the first...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized fertility healthytime Source Type: news
Conclusions The case presented is unique in that 2 rare pathologies, bilateral Sertoli cell tumors of the ovary and MRKH syndrome, developed concomitantly in the same patient.
Source: Journal of Pelvic Medicine and Surgery - Category: Surgery Tags: Case Reports Source Type: research
Conclusions Laparoscopic-assisted uterus donor retrieval is feasible and affords all the advantages of a minimally invasive technique, thereby reducing the morbidity of the procedure. It helps in better dissection of the vessels, shortens the operative time, and helps to minimize tissue handling of the harvested uterus and vessels.
Source: Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
Dr. Giuliano Testa, a transplant surgeon at Baylor University Medical Center at Dallas who led the medical team that performed the first successful uterus transplants in the United States, said Tuesday that he hopes “what we are doing is going to shed light on infertility for women.” “I personally never knew it was such a widespread issue,” Testa said at the TIME 100 Gala on Tuesday. “We should be thinking about it not just as a birth, but a wellbeing issue.” Testa attended the TIME 100 Gala after being named by TIME magazine as one of the most influential people in the world for his rol...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized onetime T1002018 Source Type: news
More News: Hysterectomy | Infertility | Medical Ethics | MRKH Syndrome | OBGYN | Reproduction Medicine | Transplants | Women