The STOP-Bang Questionnaire as a Screening Tool for Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Pregnancy

We examined the validity of the STOP-Bang questionnaire and a modified STOP-Bang questionnaire to screen for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in women with obesity during the second trimester of pregnancy.Methods:Ninety-nine pregnant women age 18 years or older with body mass index≥ 40 kg/m2 completed the STOP-Bang questionnaire during their second trimester. The number of oxygen desaturation events (≥ 4% from baseline) was measured using overnight pulse oximetry, with OSA defined as≥ 5 events/h. A Modified STOP-Bang score was derived by replacing the“Tired” item with Epworth Sleepiness Scale score≥ 10. Seven candidate models were compared using information theoretic criteria: STOP-Bang, Modified STOP-Bang, and individual STOP-Bang items (Snore, Tired, Observed to stop breathing, high blood Pressure and Neck circumference). We used penalized logistic regression and negative binomial regression to derive predicted probabilities of having OSA and the predicted total event counts.Results:The predicted probability of meeting oximetry criteria for OSA increased with higher STOP-Bang scores, from
Source: Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine : JCSM - Category: Sleep Medicine Source Type: research

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ConclusionsThis is the first randomised investigation of BP self-monitoring for the management of pregnancy hypertension and indicates that a large RCT would be feasible.
Source: Pregnancy Hypertension: An International Journal of Womens Cardiovascular Health - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 12 October 2019Source: Journal of Hospital InfectionAuthor(s): Jaspreet Dhanda, James Gray, Ellen Knox, Amreen Bashir
Source: Journal of Hospital Infection - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
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Source: Veterinary Research - Category: Veterinary Research Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 12 October 2019Source: Anaesthesia Critical Care &Pain MedicineAuthor(s): Arnaud Chaumeron, Jeremie Castanie, Louis Philippe Fortier, Patrick Basset, Sophie Bastide, Sandrine Alonso, Jean-Yves Lefrant, Philippe CuvillonABSTRACTBackground: Rapid sequence induction (RSI) is recommended in patients at risk of aspiration, but induced hemodynamic adverse events, including tachycardia. In elderly patients, this trial aimed to assess the impact of the addition of remifentanil during RSI on the occurrence of: tachycardia (primary outcome), hypertension (due to intubation) nor hypotension (rem...
Source: Anaesthesia, Critical Care and Pain Medicine - Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: research
Tubal reversal and pregnancy are possible after endometrial ablation. Dr. Monteith offers hope to women who want to ahve a baby after endometrial ablation. The post Can You Get Pregnant After Endometrial Ablation And Tubal Ligation? appeared first on A Personal Choice.
Source: Tubal Reversal Blog - Category: Reproduction Medicine Authors: Tags: Endometrial Ablation Greencastle Pennsylvania Source Type: blogs
Authors: Bhullar SK, Shah AK, Dhalla NS Abstract Effective therapy of hypertension represents a key strategy for reducing the burden of cardiovascular disease and its associated mortality. The significance of voltage dependent L-type Ca²⁺ channels to Ca²⁺ influx, and of their regulatory mechanisms in the development of heart disease, is well established. A wide variety of L-type Ca²⁺ channel inhibitors and Ca²⁺ antagonists have been found to be beneficial not only in the treatment of hypertension, but also in myocardial infarction and heart failure. Over the past two decades, another cla...
Source: Reviews in Cardiovascular Medicine - Category: Cardiology Tags: Rev Cardiovasc Med Source Type: research
Authors: Bashir MU, Bhagra A, Kapa S, McLeod CJ Abstract Atrial fibrillation is the most common symptomatic arrhythmia that is associated with stroke. Contemporary management of the disease is focused on anticoagulation to prevent stroke, coupled with catheter ablation to limit symptoms and prevent deleterious cardiac remodeling. Emerging data highlights the importance of lifestyle modification by managing sleep apnea, increasing physical activity, and weight loss. There is significant data that supports a link between the autonomic nervous system, arrhythmia development, and atrial fibrillation therapy. It is like...
Source: Reviews in Cardiovascular Medicine - Category: Cardiology Tags: Rev Cardiovasc Med Source Type: research
Many overweight people are deficient in this essential nutrients. → Support PsyBlog for just $4 per month. Enables access to articles marked (M) and removes ads. → Explore PsyBlog's ebooks, all written by Dr Jeremy Dean: Accept Yourself: How to feel a profound sense of warmth and self-compassion The Anxiety Plan: 42 Strategies For Worry, Phobias, OCD and Panic Spark: 17 Steps That Will Boost Your Motivation For Anything Activate: How To Find Joy Again By Changing What You Do
Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Weight Loss Source Type: blogs
Sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) in pregnancy can present as snoring and/or obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), and the prevalence is increasing due to the increase in maternal obesity. Pregnant women often present with fatigue and daytime sleepiness rather than the classic symptoms. Habitual snoring, older age, chronic hypertension, and high prepregnancy body mass index are reliable indicators of increased risk for SDB and should trigger further testing. The gold standard for diagnosis of OSA is an overnight laboratory polysomnography. Although there are no studies linking SDB to poor fetal outcomes, fetal well-being remains p...
Source: Sleep Medicine Clinics - Category: Sleep Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
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Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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