Father ‘Buried Alive’ After Stroke Triggers Rare Locked-In Syndrome

In 2017, Darren Leith had a stroke that left him in a locked-in state. This recent story on Leith reminded me that many patients seek to hasten their death not because of their (non-fixable) medical condition but because of their (potentially fixable) social condition. While Leith has not sought to end his life, his depression comes not so much from the locked-in condition as much as from the fact that he is 100 miles away from his family in a neuro-rehabilitation center.  The last time Leith’s daughter visited him, he spelled out five words by using his eyes to point to letters on a board - "take me home you two." 
Source: blog.bioethics.net - Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

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Publication date: March–April 2020Source: Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, Volume 67Author(s): Claudine FoxAbstractThis paper reports a study that adopted age-appropriate terminology to investigate 6–11-year-old children's attitudes towards mental illness (N = 120). The study utilized a semi-structured interview technique and card selection tasks to assess the children's attitudes to individuals diagnosed with different mental illnesses (anorexia nervosa, depression and dementia). Their attitudes were measured in terms of social distance, social functioning, emotional response and trait at...
Source: Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology - Category: Child Development Source Type: research
In January, 2019, seven Aboriginal children died by suicide in Australia. By March, at least 24 young Aboriginal people were reported to have taken their lives, including three children younger than 12 years. 1 Despite Australia's wealth, the health st...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Infants and Children Source Type: news
BACKGROUND: About 40,000 infertile couples visit Tu Du Hospital, Vietnam for consultation and treatment of infertility per year. Depression in infertile female patients not only influences mental wellbeing, but also affects the effectiveness of infertility...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Young Adults Source Type: news
Background: About 84% of the agriculture, fishing, and forestry occupational sector is comprised of farmers. This sector is at high risk for suicide in the United States. Recent disasters and trade upheavals may make farmers and their families more vulnera...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Occupational Issues Source Type: news
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Bipolar disorder has the highest rate of suicide of all psychiatric conditions and is approximately 20-30 times that of the general population. The purpose of this review is to discuss findings relevant to bipolar disorder and suicide. R...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Research Methods, Surveillance and Codes, Models Source Type: news
The objective of this article is to review the current evidence for these association...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To review and discuss recent advances in evidence-based interventions (EBIs) for youth suicide risk. RECENT FINDINGS: There is a growing body of research on the effectiveness of interventions targeting suicidal ideation and behavior amon...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news
OBJECTIVES: To determine the incidence, risk, and timing of mortality (unnatural and natural causes) among youth seen in a pediatric emergency department (ED) for mental health concerns, compared with matched non-mental health ED controls.METHODS: ...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news
There was nothing quite like the slang used in the early days of the space program. Saying something was “OK” would not do when you could say “A-OK” instead. Saying, “Let’s get moving,” when you’ve been sealed in your spacecraft for hours waiting to launch while Mission Control sorts out technical glitches, was weak tea compared to the “Light this candle!” as an exasperated Al Shepard barked in 1961. And then, too, there was “screw the pooch.” A cleaned-up version of a decidedly coarser term, it meant, in the pilot’s argot, to crash your jet or l...
Source: TIME: Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Uncategorized climate change newsletter Space Source Type: news
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Source: Archives of Suicide Research - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Source Type: research
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