Soda Taxes Are a ‘No-Brainer’ for Public Health, Says the Author of a New Study on Them

A new JAMA study suggests taxing sugary drinks really can make people buy fewer of them, potentially translating to better public health. Taxes on soda and other junk foods are frequently proposed as a way to coax Americans into eating more healthfully, and in turn cut rates of diet-related chronic diseases such as obesity, type 2 diabetes, cancer and heart disease. While Americans are drinking less soda than they used to, it’s still a major source of sweeteners and empty calories for many people, contributing to an estimated 25,000 premature deaths a year. But lawmakers and health experts have debated whether taxes on sodas and other sugary beverages, such as fruit juices and energy drinks, are actually good policy. Studies conducted in places that have enacted soda taxes, such as Berkeley, Calif. and Mexico, suggest they can drive down sales, but opponents argue that the policies can’t replace public health education and unfairly target low-income people who can’t afford higher price tags. The soda industry is, unsurprisingly, also a vocal opponent—so much so that its influence helped sway lawmakers in California, home of the U.S.’ first soda tax, to ban future ones. The new JAMA study examined the effects of Philadelphia’s decision to place an excise tax of 1.5¢ per oz. on sugar- and artificially sweetened drinks, starting January 2017. In the year after the policy went into effect, researchers found that sweetened beverage purchas...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized diet embargoed study Food Nutrition public health soda tax Source Type: news

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AbstractAimsTo determine the potential risk factors and construct the predictive model of diabetic risk among a relatively low risk middle-aged and elderly Chinese population.MethodsInformation of participants was collected in the Dongfeng-Tongji cohort study, a perspective cohort study of Chinese occupational population. The main outcome was incident type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Based on the conventional risk factors of diabetes, we defined low risk participants without underlying diseases such as coronary heart disease, stroke, cancer, dyslipidemia, hypertension, metabolic syndrome, obesity and family history of diabetes. Tot...
Source: Acta Diabetologica - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
In this study, we found that cofilin competes with tau for direct microtubule binding in vitro, in cells, and in vivo, which inhibits tau-induced microtubule assembly. Genetic reduction of cofilin mitigates tauopathy and synaptic defects in Tau-P301S mice and movement deficits in tau transgenic C. elegans. The pathogenic effects of cofilin are selectively mediated by activated cofilin, as active but not inactive cofilin selectively interacts with tubulin, destabilizes microtubules, and promotes tauopathy. These results therefore indicate that activated cofilin plays an essential intermediary role in neurotoxic signaling th...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Prevention is often called the best medicine — but research has shown that millions of Americans are not getting the preventive care they should to live long, healthy lives. Obstacles like inadequate access to care and financial barriers can keep people away from the doctor, but anxiety and feeling like care is unnecessary are also common deterrents. “There are a lot of things that every person could do to stay healthy, and this could help people to feel better, improve their quality of life and help them to live longer,” says Dr. Alex Krist, a professor of family medicine at Virginia Commonwealth Univer...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Longevity public health Source Type: news
Hui-Min Liu1,2, Qin Hu3, Qiang Zhang4, Guan-Yue Su5, Hong-Mei Xiao1,2, Bo-Yang Li1,2, Wen-Di Shen1,2, Xiang Qiu1,2, Wan-Qiang Lv1,2 and Hong-Wen Deng1,2,6* 1Center of System Biology and Data Information, School of Basic Medical Science, Central South University, Changsha, China 2Center of Reproductive Health, School of Basic Medical Science, Central South University, Changsha, China 3Kangda College of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China 4College of Public Health, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, China 5Institute of Biomedical Engineering, West China School of Basic Medical Sciences and Forensic Medicine, ...
Source: Frontiers in Genetics - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: research
Maunil K. Desai1 and Roberta Diaz Brinton2,3* 1School of Pharmacy, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, United States 2Center for Innovation in Brain Science, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, United States 3Departments of Pharmacology and Neurology, College of Medicine, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, United States Women have a higher incidence and prevalence of autoimmune diseases than men, and 85% or more patients of multiple autoimmune diseases are female. Women undergo sweeping endocrinological changes at least twice during their lifetime, puberty and menopause, with many women undergoin...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
From the Incretin Concept and the Discovery of GLP-1 to Today's Diabetes Therapy Jens Juul Holst* Department of Biomedical Sciences, Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Basic Metabolic Research, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark Researchers have been looking for insulin-stimulating factors for more than 100 years, and in the 1960ties it was definitively proven that the gastrointestinal tract releases important insulinotropic factors upon oral glucose intake, so-called incretin hormones. The first significant factor identified was the duodenal glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide, GIP, wh...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
(CNN) — Whether you eat breakfast might be linked with your risk of dying early from cardiovascular disease, according to a new study. Skipping breakfast was significantly associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular-related death, especially stroke-related death, in the study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology on Monday. After a person’s age, sex, race, socioeconomic status, diet, lifestyle, body mass index and disease status were taken into account, the study found that those who never had breakfast had a 87% higher risk of cardiovascular mortality compared with people who h...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News CNN Heart Disease Source Type: news
Increasing Upstream Chromatin Long–Range Interactions May Favor Induction of Circular RNAs in LysoPC-Activated Human Aortic Endothelial Cells Angus Li1,2†, Yu Sun1†, Charles Drummer IV1, Yifan Lu1, Daohai Yu3, Yan Zhou4, Xinyuan Li1, Simone J. Pearson1, Candice Johnson1, Catherine Yu5, William Y. Yang1, Kevin Mastascusa1, Xiaohua Jiang1, Jianxin Sun6, Thomas Rogers7, Wenhui Hu1, Hong Wang1 and Xiaofeng Yang1,7* 1Center for Metabolic Disease Research, Lewis Katz School of Medicine, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, United States 2Department of Biomedical Engineering, Pratt School of Engineering...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
Smith Etareri Evivie1,2†, Amro Abdelazez1,3, Bailiang Li1†, Xin Bian4, Wan Li1, Jincheng Du1, Guicheng Huo1* and Fei Liu1 1Key Laboratory of Dairy Science, Ministry of Education, College of Food Sciences, Northeast Agricultural University, Harbin, China 2Food Science and Nutrition Unit, Department of Animal Science, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Benin, Benin City, Nigeria 3Department of Dairy Microbiology, Animal Production Research Institute, Agriculture Research Center, Giza, Egypt 4Department of Food Engineering, Harbin University of Commerce, Harbin, China Foodborne pathogens are a ma...
Source: Frontiers in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
Conclusion Activation of the Nrf2-dependent antioxidant system plays an important role in cell defense against oxidative stress damage, whereas the insufficiency of the Nrf2 system is associated with multiple aspects of the genesis and progression of metabolic diseases, posing a great risk to the cardiovascular system (Figure 1). The systemic increase of Nrf2 activity by several activators may be beneficial in the treatment of metabolic diseases. In addition, selective upregulation of Nrf2 genes may represent a potential therapy in obesity, diabetes and atherosclerosis. Looking to the future, experimental research that el...
Source: Frontiers in Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
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