Are You a New Mom Struggling with Scary, Shame-Inducing Thoughts?

You recently had a baby, and everyone keeps saying that you must be in sheer and utter bliss. Clearly, you’re captivated by your bundle of joy. You must be enamored and in absolute love. I bet you’re just walking on cloud nine. You finally have what you’ve always wanted. Life is complete now, isn’t it? you hear. And all you want to do is cry (or scream) in their face. Because that’s not how you feel. And those aren’t the thoughts running through your mind. Instead, you keep thinking that you’ve made a mistake. A horrible mistake. I never should’ve had this baby. Or you think I don’t like being a mother. I just want my old life back, where I had freedom, and I felt like myself. Or your mind is filled with never-ending worries and what-ifs: What if I slip and drop the baby? What if the baby stops breathing in his bassinet? What if she cracks her head in the tub? What if he catches a cold, which turns out to be something much worse? What if a car slams into the stroller? Or other scary, disturbing thoughts arise—and keep arising: If he doesn’t stop screaming, I swear I will throw him over the balcony. I could easily drown her in the bathtub. And you hate yourself for these thoughts. You are shocked and ashamed of these thoughts. You are angry with yourself, and deeply disappointed. You think there’s something really wrong with you. There must be. Maybe you tell yourself that you should be grateful because...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Books General Inspiration & Hope Mental Health and Wellness Parenting Self-Help Women's Issues Source Type: blogs

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I’ve been a mental health therapist for over 10 years and in the social work profession for more than 20. I have been pregnant 8 times, with 4 living children. I consider myself to be pretty self-aware, intelligent, and inquisitive. And yet… I had some form of perinatal mood and anxiety disorders (PMADs) with each of my pregnancies. I just didn’t know it. Oh, sure, I got sad and I got angry and with my older son, I couldn’t let myself fully bond to him until he was 9 months old, but I was fine, right? I even took medication, but that’s normal, right? I was introduced to PMADs last year when ...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Parenting Personal Pregnancy Women's Issues Birth trauma perinatal anxiety disorder perinatal mood disorder Postpartum Disorder Source Type: blogs
According to a 2013 study published in JAMA Psychiatry, one out of seven mothers suffers from postpartum depression (PPD). That’s 14 percent of all new moms. Katherine Stone, founder of Postpartum Progress, makes a good point that more women will suffer from postpartum depression and related illnesses this year than the combined number of new cases for men and women of tuberculosis, leukemia, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease and epilepsy. Even though, according to Dr. Ruta Nonacs of Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, PPD is the most common comp...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Depression Mental Health and Wellness Parenting Pregnancy Self-Help Women's Issues Apathy Depressive Episode Postpartum Source Type: blogs
Conclusions: Sleep patterns in children and adolescents were related to the psychiatric diagnosis of their parent(s). Future follow-up of these results may clarify the relations between early sleep differences and the risk of developing mood disorders in individuals at high familial risk.IntroductionSleep disturbances are core symptoms of mood disorders including major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder (1). Additionally, sleep problems have been associated with more severe symptoms, greater functional impairment, and increased risk for relapse among individuals with mood disorders (2). Over 40% of children and youth...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
You’ll be bringing your baby home soon. Or maybe you already have. And you want to be there for your spouse. You know that having a baby not only affects your wife’s body, but it also affects her mental health. You want to be supportive, encouraging and helpful. But you’re not exactly sure how to do that. What does it look like to support your spouse’s mental health? Where do you start? What should you avoid? Here, you’ll find suggestions from Kirsten Brunner, MA, LPC, a perinatal mental health and relationship expert. She’s the co-author of The Birth Guy’s Go-To Guide for New D...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Books Family Friends General Mental Health and Wellness Parenting Pregnancy Self-Help Child Development Fatherhood Postpartum Source Type: blogs
Bipolar disorder affects men and women in equal numbers, and the symptoms are essentially identical. But some key differences do exist—differences that might be due to biological factors, and social ones, too. For starters, research has consistently shown that women have higher rates of bipolar II disorder, “which typically presents as a chronic depressive disorder with periods of hypomania,” according to Candida Fink, MD, a board-certified child, adolescent and adult psychiatrist with a private practice in Westchester, N.Y. There’s a misconception that bipolar II disorder is less severe than bipola...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Bipolar Disorders Gender General Men's Issues Women's Issues Bipolar Disorder bipolar disorder and pregnancy bipolar I Bipolar Ii Gender Differences men and bipolar disorder menopause and bipolar disorder menstruation and bipolar Source Type: news
This study evaluated the relationship between sleep quality and symptoms of depression and anxiety in women studied in pregnancy and postpartum. Scores on standardized measures of sleep (PSQI) at 6  months postpartum, and symptoms of anxiety and depression (OASIS, the PHQ9, and EPDS) were assessed by structured interviews in 116 women in pregnancy and/or postpartum. Poor sleep quality was significantly associated with greater symptoms of depression and anxiety. Women who had significantly hig her OASIS (anxiety) scores (β = .530,p 
Source: Journal of Behavioral Medicine - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
We examined 1,221 cases from a population-based birth cohort, with subjective measures during pregnancy in mothers, and at 3 months after birth in the infants. The findings showed that all the maternal risk factors during pregnancy, except for symptoms of alcoholism and sleepiness, were related to sleep difficulties in infants. Interestingly, attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder symptomatology in mothers during pregnancy was the only variable that predicted more than two sleeping difficulties (i.e. long sleep-onset latency, co-sleeping with parents and irregular sleeping routines) at 3 months old. Our res...
Source: Journal of Sleep Research - Category: Sleep Medicine Authors: Tags: J Sleep Res Source Type: research
Within 24 hours of her second daughter’s birth, Dyane Harwood felt elated. From the moment she came home from the hospital, she started writing. Furiously. She wrote while nursing her daughter and going to the bathroom. She wrote on her hands, on the bathroom mirror, inside books and on tabletops. She yearned to write down every thought she was having. She wrote so much that her wrists ached—her carpal tunnel returning—and she was in constant pain. She also had endless energy and a newfound enthusiasm for life. She felt like she could run a long race. She couldn’t sit still, and her speech was fast ...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Bipolar Disorders General Health-related Mental Health and Wellness Self-Help Sleep Women's Issues Johns mood disorder Motherhood Parenting postpartum bipolar disorder postpartum depression Postpartum Disorder Source Type: blogs
CONCLUSIONS: Maternal anxiety, depression and sleep disorders are associated with a relative increase in the number of ADHD-H, ADHD-I and total ADHD symptoms in preschoolers. PMID: 29665879 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Epidemiology and Psychiatric Sciences - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Epidemiol Psychiatr Sci Source Type: research
Abstract Maternal sleep deprivation (MSD) has been suggested to be associated with increased frequency of neurodevelopmental disorders in offspring in both humans and animal models. However, the underlying cellular and molecular mechanism is still unclear. We have recently reported that MSD at different stages of pregnancy impairs the emotional and cognitive functions, and suppresses hippocampal CA1 long-term potentiation (LTP) in the offspring rats. Here, we report that the MSD induced LTP impairment at the CA1 hippocampus of the offspring rats is associated with increased long-term depression (LTD) and reduced e...
Source: Neuropharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: Neuropharmacology Source Type: research
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