Are You a New Mom Struggling with Scary, Shame-Inducing Thoughts?

You recently had a baby, and everyone keeps saying that you must be in sheer and utter bliss. Clearly, you’re captivated by your bundle of joy. You must be enamored and in absolute love. I bet you’re just walking on cloud nine. You finally have what you’ve always wanted. Life is complete now, isn’t it? you hear. And all you want to do is cry (or scream) in their face. Because that’s not how you feel. And those aren’t the thoughts running through your mind. Instead, you keep thinking that you’ve made a mistake. A horrible mistake. I never should’ve had this baby. Or you think I don’t like being a mother. I just want my old life back, where I had freedom, and I felt like myself. Or your mind is filled with never-ending worries and what-ifs: What if I slip and drop the baby? What if the baby stops breathing in his bassinet? What if she cracks her head in the tub? What if he catches a cold, which turns out to be something much worse? What if a car slams into the stroller? Or other scary, disturbing thoughts arise—and keep arising: If he doesn’t stop screaming, I swear I will throw him over the balcony. I could easily drown her in the bathtub. And you hate yourself for these thoughts. You are shocked and ashamed of these thoughts. You are angry with yourself, and deeply disappointed. You think there’s something really wrong with you. There must be. Maybe you tell yourself that you should be grateful because...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Books General Inspiration & Hope Mental Health and Wellness Parenting Self-Help Women's Issues Source Type: blogs

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ConclusionsBreast-milk GC rhythmicity at 1 month postpartum was not associated with infant behavior or sleep at the age of 3 months. Findings from previous studies linking breast-milk cortisol to infant neurodevelopment might be biased by the lack of GC measurements across the full diurnal cycle, and should therefore be interpreted with caution.
Source: Endocrine - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Abstract Objective/Background: Insomnia and depression are disorders that affect many perinatal women and that often are interrelated. The present study aimed to examine concurrent and prospective associations between mid-pregnancy insomnia and depression during mid-pregnancy and 8 weeks postpartum. Furthermore, differences in depression and in the sleep-related characteristics insomnia, chronotype, and sleep efficiency were explored between the two time points (mid-pregnancy versus 8 weeks postpartum), and between primiparous and multiparous participants.Participants/Methods: The study was part of the N...
Source: Behavioral Sleep Medicine - Category: Sleep Medicine Authors: Tags: Behav Sleep Med Source Type: research
Having a baby is a wonderfully happy time, right? For many women, it certainly is, but estimates show that 1 in 5 women who give birth will suffer from some type of perinatal mental illness, such as depression, anxiety, OCD or psychosis. Chances are, this includes someone you know. In today’s podcast, Dr. Katayune Kaeni, a psychologist who specializes in perinatal mental health and a sufferer herself, discusses these often confusing and debilitating disorders, particularly postpartum psychosis, a more rare and severe form of perinatal mental illness. Who is at risk? What does perinatal psychosis look like? And what ...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Children and Teens Disorders General Interview Parenting Podcast Pregnancy The Psych Central Show Women's Issues Source Type: blogs
DiscussionFactors contributing to self-rated QoL are variable across multiple domains during the perinatal period. QoL among our participants was lower than population norms. In our sample of women with depression and/or anxiety, QoL was related to postpartum depressive symptoms, but not to objectively measured sleep quality, quantity, or timing. Links between QoL and sleep may be inherently complex in perinatal women.
Source: Quality of Life Research - Category: Health Management Source Type: research
Digital cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is a safe and effective approach for reducing insomnia symptoms in pregnant women, reports astudy published today inJAMA Psychiatry.“Although sleep disturbance during pregnancy may be viewed as normative and innocuous, research indicates that it is associated with an increased risk of adverse maternal outcomes, including depression and preterm birth,” wrote Jennifer Felder, Ph.D., of the University of California, San Francis co, and colleagues. “A digital CBT-I [CBT for insomnia] program may be of particular interest for pregnant women, who report a preference fo...
Source: Psychiatr News - Category: Psychiatry Tags: anxiety CBT cbt-i cognitive behavioral therapy depression insomnia insomnia severity index JAMA Psychiatry online intervention pregnancy preterm birth Source Type: research
(CNN) — Moms-to-be who undergo physical or mental stress during their pregnancies are less likely to have a boy and may also have a higher risk of preterm birth, according to a study published Monday. “The womb is an influential first home,” said lead author Catherine Monk, director of women’s mental health in OB/GYN at NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia University Irving Medical Center. “We do know that males are more vulnerable in utero, and presumably the stress in these women is of a long-standing nature,” Monk said. Nature typically assures there are an average of 105 boys born for every...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News CNN Pregnancy Stress Source Type: news
I’ve been a mental health therapist for over 10 years and in the social work profession for more than 20. I have been pregnant 8 times, with 4 living children. I consider myself to be pretty self-aware, intelligent, and inquisitive. And yet… I had some form of perinatal mood and anxiety disorders (PMADs) with each of my pregnancies. I just didn’t know it. Oh, sure, I got sad and I got angry and with my older son, I couldn’t let myself fully bond to him until he was 9 months old, but I was fine, right? I even took medication, but that’s normal, right? I was introduced to PMADs last year when ...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Parenting Personal Pregnancy Women's Issues Birth trauma perinatal anxiety disorder perinatal mood disorder Postpartum Disorder Source Type: blogs
According to a 2013 study published in JAMA Psychiatry, one out of seven mothers suffers from postpartum depression (PPD). That’s 14 percent of all new moms. Katherine Stone, founder of Postpartum Progress, makes a good point that more women will suffer from postpartum depression and related illnesses this year than the combined number of new cases for men and women of tuberculosis, leukemia, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease and epilepsy. Even though, according to Dr. Ruta Nonacs of Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, PPD is the most common comp...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Depression Mental Health and Wellness Parenting Pregnancy Self-Help Women's Issues Apathy Depressive Episode Postpartum Source Type: blogs
Conclusions: Sleep patterns in children and adolescents were related to the psychiatric diagnosis of their parent(s). Future follow-up of these results may clarify the relations between early sleep differences and the risk of developing mood disorders in individuals at high familial risk.IntroductionSleep disturbances are core symptoms of mood disorders including major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder (1). Additionally, sleep problems have been associated with more severe symptoms, greater functional impairment, and increased risk for relapse among individuals with mood disorders (2). Over 40% of children and youth...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
You’ll be bringing your baby home soon. Or maybe you already have. And you want to be there for your spouse. You know that having a baby not only affects your wife’s body, but it also affects her mental health. You want to be supportive, encouraging and helpful. But you’re not exactly sure how to do that. What does it look like to support your spouse’s mental health? Where do you start? What should you avoid? Here, you’ll find suggestions from Kirsten Brunner, MA, LPC, a perinatal mental health and relationship expert. She’s the co-author of The Birth Guy’s Go-To Guide for New D...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Books Family Friends General Mental Health and Wellness Parenting Pregnancy Self-Help Child Development Fatherhood Postpartum Source Type: blogs
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