Therapeutic Antibodies for Nasal Polyposis Treatment: Where Are We Headed?

AbstractThis review article aims to outline what is known in the pathophysiology of chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyposis (CRSwNP) and describe the mechanism of the biologic agents being investigated for this disease. Chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyposis is an inflammatory disease of the nasal and paranasal mucosa, which causes symptoms of nasal obstruction, hyposmia, and rhinorrhea. Conventional therapy for CRSwNP includes intranasal corticosteroids (INCS) and polypectomy, but INCS offer only modest benefits, and recurrence after surgery is common. Therefore, effective pharmacologic therapies for CRSwNP are being actively sought. Monoclonal antibodies have been successful in other chronic diseases involving eosinophilic inflammation, such as chronic urticaria and asthma. Thus, researchers have begun expanding their scope and investigating the efficacy of these drugs in the treatment of nasal polyposis. The monoclonal antibodies under investigation (omalizumab (anti IgE), dupilumab (anti IL-4/IL-13), and reslizumab and mepolizumab (both anti IL-5), benralizumab (anti IL-5R α), and etokimab (anti IL-33)) target key players in the pathophysiology of nasal polyposis (NP). Dupilumab has just completed phase III trials for CRSwNP with positive results, while omalizumab, mepolizumab, and benralizumab are currently in phase III trials for this indication. At this time, whil e there are no FDA-approved biologics for use in NP, research has highlighted the contribut...
Source: Clinical Reviews in Allergy and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research

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Abstract Anaphylaxis is a life-threatening systemic reaction, normally occurring within one to two hours of exposure to an allergen. The incidence of anaphylaxis in the United States is 2.1 per 1,000 person-years. Most anaphylactic reactions occur outside the hospital setting. Urticaria, difficulty breathing, and mucosal swelling are the most common symptoms of anaphylaxis. The most common triggers are medications, stinging insect venoms, and foods; however, unidentified triggers occur in up to one-fifth of cases. Coexisting asthma, mast cell disorders, older age, underlying cardiovascular disease, peanut and tree...
Source: American Family Physician - Category: Primary Care Authors: Tags: Am Fam Physician Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: The reactions that develop during this long-term treatment may be treated by premedication-prolonged infusion but in some patients, desensitization protocols is necessary for the continuation of therapy. Revisions in desensitization protocols may be required. PMID: 32687987 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol Source Type: research
We report this consensus to support allergists and clinical immunologists to make optimal decisions under the urgent situation in Asia. PMID: 32638559 [PubMed]
Source: Allergy, Asthma and Immunology Research - Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: Allergy Asthma Immunol Res Source Type: research
Idiopathic nonhistaminergic acquired angioedema (InH-AAE) is a rare disease characterized by submucosal swelling without concomitant urticaria and poor response to antihistamines and corticosteroids.1 Compared with other forms of hereditary and acquired angioedema, InH-AAE seems to have a predilection for facial and tongue swelling, and is often difficult to diagnose as patients have normal laboratory values and no family history.1 To our knowledge, there have been no publications to date describing idiopathic nonhistaminergic angioedema as a complication of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infe...
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Letters Source Type: research
Idiopathic nonhistaminergic acquired angioedema (InH-AAE) is a rare disease characterized by submucosal swelling without concomitant urticaria and poor response to antihistamines and corticosteroids.1 Compared with other forms of hereditary and acquired angioedema, InH-AAE seems to have a predilection for facial and tongue swelling and is often difficult to diagnose because patients have normal laboratory values and no family history.1 To the best of our knowledge, there have been no publications to date describing idiopathic nonhistaminergic angioedema as a complication of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (...
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Letters Source Type: research
Authors: Song WJ, Choi M, Lee DH, Kwon JW, Kim GW, Kim MH, Kim MA, Kim MH, Kim BK, Kim S, Kim JS, Kim JE, Kim JY, Kim JH, Kim HJ, Kim HO, Kim HB, Roh JY, Park KH, Park KY, Park HK, Park H, Bae JM, Byun JY, Song DJ, Ahn YM, Lee SE, Lee YB, Lee JS, Lee JH, Lim KH, Ye YM, Chang YS, Jeon YH, Jeon J, Jue MS, Choi SH, Choi JH, Hur GY, Park YM, Lim DH, Youn SW Abstract Chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU) is defined as the occurrence of spontaneous wheals, angioedema, or both for>6 weeks in the absence of specific causes. It is a common condition associated with substantial disease burden both for affected individuals a...
Source: Allergy, Asthma and Immunology Research - Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: Allergy Asthma Immunol Res Source Type: research
Severe asthma (SA) often requires subspecialist management and treatment with biologic therapies and/or maintenance systemic corticosteroids (mSCS). Objective: To describe contemporary, real-world biologic and mSCS use among U.S., subspecialist-treated patients with SA.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Letters Source Type: research
Severe asthma (SA) often requires subspecialist management and treatment with biologic therapies and/or maintenance systemic corticosteroids (mSCS). Objective: To describe contemporary, real-world biologic and mSCS use among U.S., subspecialist-treated patients with SA.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Letters Source Type: research
Biologics are effective treatments for patients with severe asthma and urticaria. We sought to determine whether the prior authorization process for these medications delays therapy, and if patients are at risk of disease exacerbations while awaiting initiation of treatment.
Source: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Source Type: research
Idiopathic anaphylaxis (IA) is a rare condition that can be lethal.1 Prophylactic regimens for frequent attacks are not yet standardized. These treatments may include long-term systemic corticosteroids, high-dose antihistamines, and mast cell stabilizers. Despite these regimens, patients may become corticosteroid dependent (20%) and develop potential adverse effects.2 Omalizumab is a monoclonal anti-IgE antibody that is indicated in uncontrolled, moderate to severe, persistent asthma3 and chronic idiopathic urticaria.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Letters Source Type: research
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