Analysis of Nipah Virus Codon Usage and Adaptation to Hosts

A recent outbreak of Nipah virus (NiV) in India has caused 17 deaths among people living in districts of Kerala state. Its zoonotic nature as well as high rate of human-to-human transmission has led researchers worldwide to work high for understanding the different aspects of the NiV. We performed a codon usage analysis based on publicly available nucleotide sequences of NiV and its host adaptation along with other members of genus Henipavirus in ten hosts. NiV genome encodes nine open reading frames; and overall, no significant bias in codon usage was observed. Aromaticity of proteins had no impact on codon usage. An analysis of preferred codons used by NiV and the tRNA pool in human cells indicated that NiV prefers codons from a suboptimal anticodon tRNA pool. We observed that codon usage by NiV is constrained by compositional and selection pressures, but not by mutational forces. Parameters that define NiV and host relatedness in terms of codon usage were analyzed, with a codon adaptation index (CAI), relative codon deoptimization index (RCDI), and similarity index calculations; which indicated that, of all hosts analyzed, NiV was best adapted to African green monkeys. A comparative analysis based on relative codon deoptimization index (RCDI) for host adaptation of NiV, Hendra virus (HeV), Cedar virus (CedV) and Hendra like Mojiang virus (MojV) revealed that except dogs and ferrets, all evaluated hosts were more susceptible to HeV than NiV.
Source: Frontiers in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research

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SUMMARY: When preparing for the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic and its effects on the CNS, radiologists should be familiar with neuroimaging appearances in past zoonotic infectious disease outbreaks. Organisms that have crossed the species barrier from animals to humans include viruses such as Hendra, Nipah, Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, and influenza, as well as bacteria and others. Brain CT and MR imaging findings have included cortical abnormalities, microinfarction in the white matter, large-vessel occlusion, and features of meningitis. In particular, the high sensitivity of diffusion-weighted MR imaging in det...
Source: American Journal of Neuroradiology - Category: Radiology Authors: Tags: ADULT BRAIN Source Type: research
This study investigated the presence of Henipa- and related viruses in the Egyptian Rousette bat in South Africa as well as determining potential excretion in urine over time.
Source: International Journal of Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: 19.007 Source Type: research
Publication date: February 2019Source: Current Opinion in Virology, Volume 34Author(s): Lin-Fa Wang, Danielle E AndersonIn the last two decades, several high impact zoonotic disease outbreaks have been linked to bat-borne viruses. These include SARS coronavirus, Hendra virus and Nipah virus. In addition, it has been suspected that ebolaviruses and MERS coronavirus are also linked to bats. It is being increasingly accepted that bats are potential reservoirs of a large number of known and unknown viruses, many of which could spillover into animal and human populations. However, our knowledge into basic bat biology and immuno...
Source: Current Opinion in Virology - Category: Virology Source Type: research
AbstractPurpose of ReviewThe review summarizes the history of the emergence of the Henipviruses, provides a general introduction of their molecular biology and the efforts to develop antiviral treatment strategies, including the successful development of a veterinary vaccine.Recent FindingsParamyxoviridae, genusHenipavirus comprises emerging pathogens detected in Southeast Asia, Australia and Africa. Henipaviruses are enveloped with non-segmented, negative-sense, single-stranded RNA molecules and are distinguished from other Paramyxoviruses by a substantially larger RNA genome. Hendra virus (HeV) and Nipah virus (NiV) are ...
Source: Current Treatment Options in Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
In this study, we evaluated the antiviral activity of the nucleoside analog 4′-azidocytidine (4′N3-C, R1479) and its 2′-monofluoro- and 2′-difluoro-modified analogs (2′F-4′N3-C and 2′diF-4′N3-C) against representative paramyxoviruses (Nipah virus, Hendra virus, measles virus, and human parainfluenza virus 3) and filoviruses (Ebola virus, Sudan virus, and Ravn virus). We observed enhanced antiviral activity against paramyxoviruses with both 2′diF-4′N3-C and 2′F-4′N3-C compared to R1479. On the other hand, while R1479 and 2′diF-4′N3-C inhibit...
Source: Antiviral Therapy - Category: Virology Source Type: research
In this study, we evaluated the antiviral activity of the nucleoside analog 4'-azidocytidine (4'N3-C, R1479) and its 2'-monofluoro- and 2'-difluoro-modified analogs (2'F-4'N3-C and 2'diF-4'N3-C) against representative paramyxoviruses (Nipah virus, Hendra virus, measles virus, and human parainfluenza virus 3) and filoviruses (Ebola virus, Sudan virus, and Ravn virus). We observed enhanced antiviral activity against paramyxoviruses with both 2'diF-4'N3-C and 2'F-4'N3-C compared to R1479. On the other hand, while R1479 and 2'diF-4'N3-C inhibited filoviruses similarly to paramyxoviruses, we observed 10-fold lower filovirus inh...
Source: Antiviral Research - Category: Virology Authors: Tags: Antiviral Res Source Type: research
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Source: Antiviral Therapy - Category: Virology Source Type: research
Abstract The henipaviruses Nipah virus and Hendra virus are highly pathogenic zoonotic paramyxoviruses which have caused fatal outbreaks of encephalitis and respiratory disease in humans. Despite the availability of a licensed equine Hendra virus vaccine and a neutralizing monoclonal antibody shown to be efficacious against henipavirus infections in non-human primates, there remains no approved therapeutics or vaccines for human use. To explore the possibility of developing small-molecule nucleoside inhibitors against henipaviruses, we evaluated the antiviral activity of 4'-azidocytidine (R1479), a drug previously...
Source: Antiviral Research - Category: Virology Authors: Tags: Antiviral Res Source Type: research
Authors: Enchéry F, Horvat B Abstract Hendra virus and Nipah virus (NiV) are highly pathogenic zoonotic paramyxoviruses, from henipavirus genus, that have emerged in late 1990s in Australia and South-East Asia, respectively. Since their initial identification, numerous outbreaks have been reported, affecting both domestic animals and humans, and multiple rounds of person-to-person NiV transmission were observed. Widely distributed fruit bats from Pteropodidae family were found to be henipavirus natural reservoir. Numerous studies have reported henipavirus seropositivity in pteropid bats, including bats in Af...
Source: International Reviews of Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: Int Rev Immunol Source Type: research
by Raina K. Plowright, Alison J. Peel, Daniel G. Streicker, Amy T. Gilbert, Hamish McCallum, James Wood, Michelle L. Baker, Olivier Restif Progress in combatting zoonoses that emerge from wildlife is often constrained by limited knowledge of the biology of pathogens within reservoir hosts. We focus on the host–pathogen dynamics of four emerging viruses associated with bats: Hendra, Nipah, Ebola, and Marburg viruses. Spillover of ba t infections to humans and domestic animals often coincides with pulses of viral excretion within bat populations, but the mechanisms driving such pulses are unclear. Three hypotheses dom...
Source: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases - Category: Tropical Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
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