Some Real-World Lessons for the Health IT Hyper-Enthusiasts

An article was published in Health Leaders Media yesterday by Scott Mace, senior technology editor entitled "Scot Silverstein's Good Health IT and Bad Health IT" at this link.(Actually, the terms "good health IT" and "bad health IT" themselves came as a result of my discussions in Australia with Prof. Jon Patrick of my conviction, presented to the Health Informatics Society of Australia in my Aug. 2012 talk "Critical Thinking on Building Trusted, Transformative Medical Information:  Improving Health IT as the First Step", that to be trusted and do no harm, health IT must be “done well".)Scott Mace observes:Inevitably, when the subject turns to the pitfalls of bad health IT, you will find Scot Silverstein, MD, ready to comment. He has been writing about health IT difficulties since 1998.Silverstein is an adjunct professor at Drexel University who I recently interviewed for an upcoming HealthLeaders magazine story on physician resistance to health IT.A recent Silverstein blog post caught my eye for the following statement: "It is impossible for people, especially medical professionals, to be 'ready' for a system that 'is not ready for them.'"I wanted to learn about the good doctor's thinking and so I gave him a call. We spoke for two hours and it felt like scratching the surface of issues that healthcare will be facing for a good while to come. Indeed, the issues we discussed were just scratching the surface.&nbs...
Source: Health Care Renewal - Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Tags: healthcare IT unintended consequences healthcare IT difficulties Ddulite Kiran Raj Pandey healthcare IT toxicity Wes Fisher MD Source Type: blogs

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Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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This study is par for the course, looking at Japanese Olympic participants. Interestingly, it hints at the upper end of the dose-response curve for physical activity, in that a longer career as a professional athlete may be detrimental in comparison to lesser degrees of exercise and training. From this large, retrospective cohort study targeting 3546 Japanese Olympic athletes, we observed significant lower mortality among Olympians compared with the Japanese general population. The overall standardised mortality ratio (SMR) was 0.29. The results were consistent with previous studies conducted in other non-Asian co...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
With millions of people across the U.S. and the world battling COVID-19 infections, many of them struggling to breathe, ventilators have become a top priority for the health-care workers trying desperately to keep patients alive. And those machines, which help patients breathe or breathe for them, are in startlingly short supply. For doctors, resorting to a ventilator is an extreme measure, used when a patient’s lungs cannot supply enough oxygen on their own. Ventilators can also give a patient’s body time to rest when breathing is difficult, and allow doctors to more easily remove lung secretions or deliver me...
Source: TIME: Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Source Type: news
Abstract The sinonasal mucosa has an essential role in defense mechanisms of the upper respiratory tract. The innate immune system presents the primary defense against noxious microorganisms followed by induction of the adaptive immune mechanisms as a consequence of the presence of pathogens. This well-known activation of adaptive immune system in response to presence of the antigen on mucosal surfaces is now broadly applicated in vaccinology research. Prevention of infectious diseases belongs to substantial challenges in maintaining the population health. Non-invasive, easily applicable mucosal vaccination purpos...
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RARITAN, N.J., February 3, 2020 – The Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson &Johnson announced today multiple data presentations from a robust solid tumor portfolio that will be featured at the American Society of Clinical Oncology Genitourinary (ASCO GU) Cancers Symposium, taking place February 13-15 in San Francisco. Company-sponsored data presentations will include clinical results for ERLEADA® (apalutamide) and niraparib in prostate cancer; and BALVERSA™ (erdafitinib) in bladder cancer. “We are committed to improving outcomes in patients with prostate and bladder cancer where high unmet ...
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Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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