At University of Miami, Faculty Without Confidence in their Hired Managers Afraid to Identify Themselves

The University of Miami has provided some vivid examples of the contrast between the power and privileges of the leaders of large health care organizations and the subservient role of faculty and staff. Background Back in 2006, we noted that while the University of Miami was paying its janitorial support staff less than seven dollars an hour, and supplying them with no health insurance, its President, Donna Shalala, was living in a 9000 square foot official mansion, with staff hired to make her bed.  While Ms Shalala did not seem very perturbed about the living conditions of the lowliest University staffers, as a member of the board of directors of UnitedHealth, she approved the munificent compensation given to its then CEO, Dr William McGuire (look here), who was a billionaire until he was forced to give up  some of the backdated stock options she had approved (look here).  More recently, we discussed how Ms Shalala's "visionary" leadership included presiding over the hiring of Dr Charles Nemeroff, who had previously been forced to resign as chairman of psychiatry at Emory University for various unethical activities (look here).  Last year, while awaiting the construction of a new presidential mansion, Ms Shalala presided over layoffs of hundreds of faculty and staff, which may have been necessitated by bad spending decisions made by her or those who reported to her (look here).  The Faculty Protest All these shenanigans apparently fin...
Source: Health Care Renewal - Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Tags: executive life style mission-hostile management medical schools Donna Shalala free speech University of Miami anechoic effect Source Type: blogs

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