Mindfulness-based interventions for cancer-related pain and depression: a narrative review of current evidence and future potential

Purpose of review People with cancer commonly experience persistent pain and psychological distress. Interventions are needed which address the multifactorial nature of pain and depression, yet few studies have examined the impact of mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) for cancer-related pain and depression. Recent findings MBIs for cancer-related pain and depression can be effectively delivered across a range of modalities and show promise for alleviating mood and some physical health symptoms, although not always pain. There is some evidence for the cost-effectiveness of MBIs. Summary The field of MBIs would benefit from greater methodological rigour and investigation into a broader range of cancer populations to increase the knowledge base and in turn the evidence base on which interventions can be developed to the benefit to patients with cancer-related pain and depression.
Source: Current Opinion in Supportive and Palliative Care - Category: Palliative Care Tags: PAIN: CANCER: Edited by Anthony H. Dickenson and Paul Farquhar-Smith Source Type: research

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Conclusions: There is strong association between the presence and severity of pain and distress symptoms such as anxiety and depression in admitted cancer patients.
Source: Indian Journal of Palliative Care - Category: Palliative Care Authors: Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Preloss mental burden showed to be a consistent predictor for postloss burden and should be addressed during palliative care. Future research should examine specific caregiver-directed interventions during specialist palliative care. PMID: 31596115 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: The American Journal of Hospice and Palliative Care - Category: Palliative Care Authors: Tags: Am J Hosp Palliat Care Source Type: research
by Drew Rosielle (@drosielle)A Series of Observations on Opioids By a Palliative Doc Who Prescribes A Lot of Opioids But Also Has Questions.This is the 5th post in a series about opioids, with a focus on how my thinking about opioids has changed over the years. See also:Part 1 – Introduction, General Disclaimers, Hand-Wringing, and a Hand-Crafted Graph.Part 2 – We Were Wrong 20 years Ago, Our Current Response to the Opioid Crisis is Wrong, But We Should Still Be Helping Most of our Long-Term Patients Reduce Their Opioid DosesPart 3 – Opioids Have Ceiling Effects, High-Doses are Rarely Therapeutic, and Ano...
Source: Pallimed: A Hospice and Palliative Medicine Blog - Category: Palliative Care Tags: cancer opioids pain rosielle The profession Source Type: blogs
by Drew Rosielle (@drosielle)A Series of Observations on Opioids By a Palliative Doc Who Prescribes A Lot of Opioids But Also Has Questions.This is the 5th post in a series about opioids, with a focus on how my thinking about opioids has changed over the years. See also:Part 1 – Introduction, General Disclaimers, Hand-Wringing, and a Hand-Crafted Graph.Part 2 – We Were Wrong 20 years Ago, Our Current Response to the Opioid Crisis is Wrong, But We Should Still Be Helping Most of our Long-Term Patients Reduce Their Opioid DosesPart 3 – Opioids Have Ceiling Effects, High-Doses are Rarely Therapeutic, and Ano...
Source: Pallimed: A Hospice and Palliative Medicine Blog - Category: Palliative Care Tags: opioid pain rosielle The profession Source Type: blogs
ConclusionsThis study supports previous findings that higher performance status, cancer diagnosis and higher baseline pain intensity predict analgesic RT response. The study presents new data showing that presence of soft tissue expansion predicts RT response and that CRP is not significantly associated with analgesic RT response.Clinical trial identificationNCT02107664 (Date of registration April 8, 2014).Legal entity responsible for the studyP ål Klepstad.FundingThe European Palliative Care Research Centre (PRC).DisclosureAll authors have declared no conflicts of interest.
Source: Annals of Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
This article discusses the holistic management of malignant wounds, with an emphasis on the control of both physical and psychosocial symptoms of wound management, as well as the impact that this may have on all those involved. Common physical symptoms of malignant wounds include malodour, bleeding, pain, exudate and pruritis. Psychosocial symptoms may result in social isolation and depression. All these symptoms have a huge impact, not only on patients and their families, but also on healthcare professionals both during and after care. Managing these symptoms requires a multidisciplinary approach to facilitate the best po...
Source: British Journal of Community Nursing - Category: Nursing Authors: Tags: Br J Community Nurs Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 21 August 2019Source: Journal of Geriatric OncologyAuthor(s): Lene Kirkhus, Magnus Harneshaug, Jūratė Šaltytė Benth, Bjørn Henning Grønberg, Siri Rostoft, Sverre Bergh, Marianne J. Hjermstad, Geir Selbæk, Torgeir Bruun Wyller, Øyvind Kirkevold, Tom Borza, Ingvild Saltvedt, Marit S. JordhøyAbstractBackgroundMaintaining physical function and quality of life (QoL) are prioritized outcomes among older adults. We aimed to identify potentially modifiable factors affecting older patients' physical function and QoL during cancer treatment.MethodsProspec...
Source: Journal of Geriatric Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
We report a case of a patient with advanced cervical cancer who presented with uncontrollable pain, MDD, and a suicide attempt. RESULT: A 39-year-old woman diagnosed with cervical cancer stage IVB presented to the Emergency Department after a suicide attempt by hanging. Upon evaluation by the palliative care psychiatrist, she reported intense pain, unresponsive to analgesics, and had a history of persistent suicidal ideation. Antidepressant treatment was started (sertraline 50mg/d) after a single dose of ketamine hydrochloride IV (0.5 mg/kg) was administered. Treatment response was measured using the Brief Edinburgh D...
Source: Palliative and Supportive Care - Category: Palliative Care Authors: Tags: Palliat Support Care Source Type: research
Conclusions: Hence, we conclude that culturally familiar instrumental classical music demonstrates a significant effect in alleviating pain, anxiety, and low mood as an adjunct to on-going therapies in cancer patients.
Source: Indian Journal of Palliative Care - Category: Palliative Care Authors: Source Type: research
Conclusion.Symptom expression is amplified in patients with delirium, whereas patients without delirium may be more responsive to palliative treatments with a significant decrease in intensity of ESAS items.Implications for Practice.Symptom expression is amplified in patients with cancer who have delirium, whereas patients without delirium may be more responsive to palliative treatments with a significant decrease in symptom intensity.
Source: The Oncologist - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Symptom Management and Supportive Care Source Type: research
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