Brain Electrical Activity Associated With Visual Attention and Reactive Motor Inhibition in Patients With Fibromyalgia

Conclusions N2, P3, theta power, and behavioral results indicate that the mechanisms of motor inhibition are sufficiently preserved to enable correct performance of the stop-signal task in patients with FM. Nevertheless, the lower modulation of alpha suggests greater difficulty in mobilizing and maintaining visual attentional resources, a result that may explain the cognitive dysfunction observed in FM.
Source: Psychosomatic Medicine - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLES Source Type: research

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Pain makes us human. It is a bell, fine-tuned by evolution, that often rings in moments necessary for our survival. Because of pain, we can receive warnings that trigger the reflexes to escape potential danger. But what happens when that bell continues to ring? How do we respond to a signal when it interferes with the other elements that make us human? Pain that lasts longer than six months is considered chronic, and it may not go away. With chronic pain, the bell’s ongoing signal gets your nervous system wound up and increases its reactivity to incoming messages. This can be quite distressing and anxiety-provoking. ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Back Pain Mind body medicine Pain Management Source Type: blogs
This is the case of a 49-year-old Gravida 1 Para 1 with a history of Essure tubal occlusion and chronic pelvic pain with retained Essure coils. Fourteen years prior to presentation the patient had Essure devices placed, despite a pre-existing Nickel allergy. Over the next several years she developed chronic pelvic pain, migraines, chronic bloating and was diagnosed with fibromyalgia. She underwent an abdominal X-ray as part of her evaluation of pelvic pain (figure 1).
Source: The Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: IMAGES IN Gynecological Surgery Source Type: research
Authors: Sawaddiruk P, Apaijai N, Paiboonworachat S, Kaewchur T, Kasitanon N, Jaiwongkam T, Kerdphoo S, Chattipakorn N, Chattipakorn SC Abstract Although coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) supplementation has shown to reduce pain levels in chronic pain, the effects of CoQ10 supplementation on pain, anxiety, brain activity, mitochondrial oxidative stress, antioxidants, and inflammation in pregabalin-treated fibromyalgia (FM) patients have not clearly elucidated. We hypothesised that CoQ10 supplementation reduced pain better than pregabalin alone via reducing brain activity, mitochondrial oxidative stress, inflammation, and increa...
Source: Free Radical Research - Category: Research Tags: Free Radic Res Source Type: research
Conditions:   Pain, Chronic;   Fibromyalgia Interventions:   Other: Pain neuroscience education;   Drug: Medical treatment Sponsor:   Kutahya Medical Sciences University Not yet recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
NEW YORK (Reuters Health)—Mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) is more effective than treatment as usual for improving function and other outcomes in patients with fibromyalgia, according to a new randomized trial. MBSR is an extension of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) intended to help patients change the way they experience symptoms, Dr. Albert Feliu-Soler of the Institut de... [Read More]
Source: The Rheumatologist - Category: Rheumatology Authors: Tags: Conditions Soft Tissue Pain Chronic pain Fibromyalgia mindfulness Pain Management patient care Source Type: research
Conclusions: Monitoring the affective dimension of pain should be included in an integrated approach to pain, and Hatha yoga may be beneficial in the pain management of FM participants. PMID: 31370034 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Advances in Mind Body Medicine - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Adv Mind Body Med Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: The evidence of VR effectiveness is promising in chronic neck pain and shoulder impingement syndrome. VR and exercises have similar effects in rheumatoid arthritis, knee arthritis, ankle instability, and post-anterior cruciate reconstruction. For fibromyalgia and back pain, as well as after knee arthroplasty, the evidence of VR effectiveness compared to exercise is absent or inconclusive. PMID: 31343702 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Physical Therapy - Category: Physiotherapy Authors: Tags: Phys Ther Source Type: research
Over the last 12 months New Zealanders have entered into the debate about cannabis and cannabinoids for medical use. In the coming year we’ll hear even more about cannabis as we consider legalising cannabis for recreational use. There is so much rhetoric around the issue, and so much misinformation I thought it high time (see what I did there?!) to write about where I see the research is at for cannabis and cannabinoids for persistent pain. For the purposes of this blog, I’m going to use the following definitions: Cannabis = the plant; cannabis-based medication = registered extracts (either synthetic or from...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Chronic pain Coping strategies Research Science in practice cannabinoids cannabis medicinal cannabis neuropathic pain persistent pain recreational cannabis Source Type: blogs
Publication date: Available online 17 July 2019Source: Best Practice &Research Clinical RheumatologyAuthor(s): Sizheng Steven Zhao, Stephen J. Duffield, Nicola J. GoodsonAbstractFibromyalgia (FM) is one of the most common conditions that rheumatologists encounter. It is characterised by chronic widespread pain, fatigue, sleep disturbances and impaired cognition. The prevalence of comorbid FM among populations with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) are considerably higher than among the general population, with pooled prevalence estimates of 18–24% in RA, 14&n...
Source: Best Practice and Research Clinical Rheumatology - Category: Rheumatology Source Type: research
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