Never Seen Measles? 5 Things to Know Never Seen Measles? 5 Things to Know

Measles is still spreading in the United States, and clinicians need to prepare for seeing their own first patient.Medscape Infectious Diseases
Source: Medscape Transplantation Headlines - Category: Transplant Surgery Tags: Infectious Diseases Article Source Type: news

Related Links:

Here’s betting you wouldn’t want anyone blowing smallpox scabs up your nose. But you might feel differently if you lived in 15th century China. Long ago, the Chinese recognized that people who had contracted smallpox once were immune to reinfection. They came up with the idea of preserving scabs from individuals who had suffered mild cases, drying them out, crushing them to a powder and blowing them up the nostril. For boys it was the right nostril, for girls it was the left because, well, 15th century. That is how the story of vaccines usually begins, though that version is decidedly incomplete. For one thing,...
Source: TIME: Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Explainer health Source Type: news
Abstract Huastecos or Teenek Amerindians are presently living at North East Mexico (San Luis Potosi State). They have probably one of the most ancient culture of Mexico and Central America together with Mayas and Olmec groups with which also show close relationships. Proximity to Atlantic Ocean/Mexican Gulf originated that Spaniards had very early contact with them at about 1519 CE or before. In the present paper we have aimed to study HLA gene profile which may be useful for HLA and disease epidemiology and transplant programs in Teeneks. HLA-DRB1*04:07, -DRB1*14:06 and -DRB1*04:11 have been found in high fr...
Source: Human Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Hum Immunol Source Type: research
The American Society for Transplantation and Cellular Therapy position statement on measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) prevention in immunocompromised cancer and hematopoietic cell transplant patients by Pergam et al. [1] addresses many concerns both providers and patients have about measles prevention post-transplant. However, we are skeptical about the data regarding the safety of the MMR vaccination guidelines for patients after allogenic bone marrow transplant as stated in this article.
Source: Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation - Category: Hematology Authors: Source Type: research
The American Society for Transplantation and Cellular Therapy position statement on MMR prevention in immunocompromised cancer and hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) patients by Pergam et. al. addresses many of the concerns both providers and patients have about Measles prevention post-transplant.1 However, we are skeptical about the data regarding the safety of the MMR vaccination guidelines for post-allogenic bone marrow transplant patients as stated in this article.
Source: Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation - Category: Hematology Authors: Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONSWe confirm that seroprotection for vaccine-preventable disease is affected by treatment for pediatric malignancy. A single booster dose of vaccine might be a practical way to restore vaccine immunity in patients after chemotherapy.
Source: Mediterranean Journal of Hematology and Infectious Diseases - Category: Hematology Authors: Source Type: research
Measles is a life-threatening viral infection that may occur after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), and until now, there has been no active antiviral treatment [1,2]. After the introduction of the measles vaccine in the early 1980s, decreased vaccinal coverage of the population was observed in many countries, leading to the re-emergence of measles and an increased risk of widespread outbreaks and of life-threatening disease in immunocompromised patients. Worldwide, the annual number of measles deaths has remained steady at approximately 100,000 [3,4].
Source: Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation - Category: Hematology Authors: Source Type: research
Measles is a life-threatening viral infection that may occur after allogeneic haematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), and until now, there has been no active antiviral treatment [1, 2]. After the introduction of the measles vaccine in the early 1980s, a decreased vaccinal coverage of the population was observed in many countries, leading to measles re-emergence, an increased risk of outbreaks worldwide and of the life-threatening disease appearing in immunocompromised patients. The worldwide number of measles deaths remains around 100,000 yearly [3, 4].
Source: Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation - Category: Hematology Authors: Source Type: research
Vaccine-preventable infections are occurring at epidemic rates both nationally and internationally. At the same time, rates of vaccine hesitancy and refusal are increasing across the country leading to decreased herd immunity. For immunosuppressed transplant recipients, this situation poses great risk. Currently, 1 in 6 pediatric solid organ transplant recipients is hospitalized with a vaccine-preventable infection in the first 5 years posttransplant. For many recipients, these infections result in significant morbidity, mortality, and increased hospitalization costs. Surprisingly, despite this risk many transplant recipie...
Source: Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Tags: Reviews Source Type: research
ConclusionsConsanguineous marriages account for a genetic “founder effect.” SCID is a pediatric emergency that dictates immediate precautions and curative treatment with HSCT. Due to lack of newborn screening for SCID within the Palestinian population, most patients in this cohort were diagnosed upon clinical symptoms, which led to a delayed diagnosis, harmful administration of contra-indicated live vaccines, delay in HSCT, and poor outcome.
Source: Journal of Clinical Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in recipients of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantations (HCT) [1,2]. Whether or not immune protection can be transferred from donor to host by adoptive transplantation of mature lymphocytes within an allograft has not been completely clarified [2 –7]. Likewise, little is known about the persistence of residual host-type memory B and plasma cells, their ability to provide protective antibodies post allogeneic HCT, and whether this host-type immunity is influenced by clinical parameters, such as transplant conditioning and pharmacological im munosuppression.
Source: Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation - Category: Hematology Authors: Source Type: research
More News: Infectious Diseases | Measles | Transplant Surgery | Transplants | USA Health