Allergy to food additives

Purpose of review To provide an update of the studies concerning the diagnosis and management of food additives allergy. Recent findings Additives improve specific characteristics of food products, but they may induce allergic even life-threatening reactions. Physical examination and medical history are basic to assess specific in-vivo and in-vitro tests. The only treatment for allergic patients consists in avoiding the food containing culprit additives. High-risk patients should be able to recognize severe reactions and self-manage them. Summary The prevalence of adverse reactions to food additives is low, and it may depend on comorbidities, like asthma or chronic idiopathic urticaria. Food labels may help the correct identification of ingredients. Natural additives like spices should cause immediate reactions because of a pollen-sensitization or panallargen proteins presence. Additive-free diets may help the patient care, but the authors suggest assessing an oral food challenge with the culprit substance if there are no contraindications.
Source: Current Opinion in Allergy and Clinical Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: FOOD ALLERGY: Edited by Alessandro Fiocchi and Motohiro Ebisawa Source Type: research

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This study — known as the Learning Early About Peanut or LEAP trial — showed that children at high risk of developing peanut allergies who are introduced to peanuts at 4 months to 6 months old had a significantly lower risk of developing a peanut allergy than those who waited until they were 5 years; 1.9% of the kids who had peanuts early developed an allergy, compared with 13.7% of the kids who waited. The LEAP trial formed the basis for Monday’s new recommendations, which encourage the early introduction of peanut products in infants at high risk for allergies. But most babies are not at high risk, and ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News CNN Food Allergies Source Type: news
Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic immune mediated disease. As EoE is largely food driven, elimination diets (ED) are one of the two primary modalities used to treat EoE 1,2 Options include empiric EDs (6, 4, or 2 food EDs) or targeted EDs based on food allergy testing.3,4 Recently, children with EoE have been reported to develop immediate hypersensitivity reactions with reintroduction of previously IgE tolerated milk.5,6,7,8 Herein, anaphylaxis to previously tolerated wheat in an adult with EoE, and diffuse urticaria from soy reintroduction in a teen with EoE are presented.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Letters Source Type: research
Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic immune-mediated disease. Because EoE is largely food driven, elimination diet (ED) is 1 of the 2 primary modalities used to treat EoE1,2 Options include empiric EDs (6, 4, or 2 food EDs) or targeted EDs based on food allergy testing.3,4 Recently, children with EoE have been reported to develop immediate hypersensitivity reactions with reintroduction of previously immunoglobulin E (IgE) tolerated milk.5 –8 Herein, anaphylaxis to previously tolerated wheat in an adult with EoE, and diffuse urticaria from soy reintroduction in a teen with EoE are presented.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Letters Source Type: research
ConclusionsOmalizumab appears to be an excellent therapeutic option in children with inadequately controlled severe allergic asthma, allergic rhinitis and rhinosinusitis, with or without food allergy.
Source: Italian Journal of Pediatrics - Category: Pediatrics Source Type: research
This article provides highlights of the original research published in 2018 issues of JACI: In Practice on the subjects of anaphylaxis, asthma, dermatitis, drug allergy, eosinophilic disorders, food allergy, immune deficiency, rhinitis/upper respiratory disease, and urticaria/angioedema. Within each topic, practical aspects of diagnosis and management are emphasized. Treatments discussed include lifestyle modifications, allergen avoidance therapy, positive and negative effects of pharmacologic therapy, and various forms of immunologic and desensitization management. We hope this review will help readers consolidate and use...
Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
It is well established that autoimmune diseases, atopic conditions and asthma affect adult females more frequently than adult males. This discrepancy typically develops after childhood and affects females differently depending on their life cycle. As children, males have higher total and allergen specific IgE levels than females and are more likely to suffer from atopic disease and asthma than girls. However, as adults, this prevalence reverses and females are more likely to develop atopic conditions such as food allergies, atopic dermatitis, urticaria, angioedema and asthma.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
Conclusions: In the CAR registry, patients with SAA treated with omalizumab showed a significant positive effect of anti-IgE therapy not only on the asthma control, but also on allergic comorbidities. PMID: 30429711 [PubMed]
Source: Advances in Dermatology and Allergology - Category: Dermatology Tags: Postepy Dermatol Alergol Source Type: research
Allergic diseases are of great concern because of their high prevalence, which is still rising in several regions, their impact on patients ’ physical and psychological health, the huge burden they place on patients’ quality of life, as well as the socioeconomic consequences that they cause. Recent research has provided new data on both genetic and environmental risk factors of atopic/allergic diseases. The application of new techno logies such as “omics” has allowed a better understanding of the pathogenesis and has helped with the identification of therapeutic targets. Immense progress has been ma...
Source: International Archives of Allergy and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
(CNN) — Sesame could become the newest allergen added to the list of foods required to be named on labels, US Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb announced Monday. Eight major food allergens must currently be declared on US labeling using their common names: milk, eggs, fish, shellfish, tree nuts, peanuts, wheat and soybeans. These foods accounted for over 90% of documented serious food allergies in the country when the Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act, which required the clear labeling of ingredients, was passed in 2004. The FDA cites the undeclared presence of allergens as...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News Allergies Local TV Sesame Source Type: news
A 5-year-old girl is seen for asthma and food allergies to peanut and tree nuts. Since her last visit, she had one allergic reaction during which she developed hives and wheezing after taking a bite of a muffin cross-contaminated with peanut. This incident was treated with epinephrine. This past winter, she had multiple upper respiratory tract infections that required 2 courses of oral corticosteroids. Her asthma is currently well controlled with daily inhaled fluticasone, with no nighttime awakenings.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: MOC-CME Review Source Type: research
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