AHA News: Predicting Heart Disease, Stroke Could Be as Easy as a Blood Test

MONDAY, April 29, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- Imagine getting a simple blood test to help doctors predict your risk for having a heart attack or stroke. That test exists, and that scenario could become reality, according to a new...
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

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(Natural News) Even the slightest brush with high blood pressure can be enough to scare many people into taking blood pressure medication. After all, high blood pressure can lead to heart disease and raise your risk of heart attack or stroke. However, researchers have found an even better way to get your blood pressure under...
Source: NaturalNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Looking for clues about the health of your brain? You might want to pay a visit to your eye doctor. Research increasingly links common eye conditions — glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration, and diabetic retinopathy — to risk for Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia. What’s interesting about the study results, says Dr. Albert Hofman, chair of epidemiology at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, is that cataracts, another common age-related eye condition, had no apparent connection to dementia risk. This gives scientists an important clue about the cause of dementia and Alzheimer&rs...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Alzheimer's Disease Brain and cognitive health Eye Health Source Type: blogs
Conclusions: The direct analyses of emissions reductions estimate substantial health benefits via coal power plant emission and PM2.5 concentration reductions. Differing responses associated with changes in the two exposure metrics underscore the importance of isolating source-specific impacts from those due to total PM2.5 exposure.
Source: Epidemiology - Category: Epidemiology Tags: Air Pollution Source Type: research
(CNN) — The red meat or white meat debate is a draw: Eating white meat, such as poultry, will have an identical effect on your cholesterol level as eating red beef, new research indicates. The long-held belief that eating white meat is less harmful for your heart may still hold true, because there may be other effects from eating red meat that contribute to cardiovascular disease, said the University of California, San Francisco researchers. This needs to be explored in more detail, they added. Non-meat proteins such as vegetables, dairy, and legumes, including beans, show the best cholesterol benefit, according to t...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News Cholesterol CNN Red Meat Source Type: news
High consumption of coffee no worse for arteries than drinking less than a cup a dayCoffee lovers who drink up to 25 cups a day can rest assured the drink is not bad for their heart, scientists say.Some previous studies have suggested that coffee stiffens arteries, putting pressure on the heart and increasing the likelihood of a heart attack or stroke, with drinkers warned to cut down their consumption.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Coffee Heart disease Food Health Heart attack Society Medical research Science Stroke UK news Source Type: news
Two major studies add to body of evidence against foods made with industrial ingredientsPeople who eat large amounts of heavily processed foods, from breakfast cereals and ready meals to muffins and ice-cream, have a greater risk of heart attack, stroke and early death, according to two major studies.The findings, from separate teams in France and Spain, add to a growing body of evidence that foods made in factories with industrial ingredients may have a hand in an array of medical disorders such as cancer, obesity and high blood pressure.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Science Health Diets and dieting Food Obesity Heart disease Life and style Source Type: news
This study examined the association between breakfast frequency and the 10-year risk of atherosclerotic CVD (ASCVD). The 10-year risk of ASCVD was defined as the risk of the first event of nonfatal myocardial infarction, coronary heart disease death, and nonfatal or fatal stroke within 10 years. Data from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2014–2016 were analyzed, and 7212 participants aged 40–79 years with no history of CVD were included. ASCVD risk was calculated according to the pooled cohort ASCVD equation, and participants with a score >7.5% were considered at high ...
Source: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research
ConclusionsOur findings showed that higher dietary vitamin K consumption was associated with a moderately lower risk of CHD, and higher plasma dp-ucMGP concentration, but not total circulating osteocalcin, was associated with increased risks of all-cause and CVD mortality. However, causal relations cannot be established because of limited number of available studies, and larger prospective studies and randomized clinical trials are needed to validate the findings.
Source: European Journal of Nutrition - Category: Nutrition Source Type: research
This study determine the relative treatment effects of NST on fatal and nonfatal CV events among statin-treated patients. Methods A network meta-analysis based on a systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing non-statin lipid-modifying agents among statin-treated patients was performed. PubMed, EMBASE, CENTRAL, and Clinicaltrial.gov were searched up to April 10, 2018. The primary outcomes were CV and all-cause mortalities. Secondary CV outcomes were coronary heart disease (CHD) death, non-fatal myocardial infarction (MI), any stroke, and coronary revascularization. Risks of discontinuations were ...
Source: Frontiers in Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
In conclusion, the evidence thus far has not been significant enough for the American College of Cardiology to recommend the incorporation of oral anticoagulants in the management of stable ischemic heart disease patients, in contrast to aspirin and clopidogrel. As the antithrombotic and antiischemic properties of these newer agents seem evident, so does their potential for increase in risk of bleeding events. Doctors have to individually tailor antithrombotic medication decisions based on the patient ’s risk-benefit profile.
Source: Current Cardiology Reports - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
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