Social media and Essure hysteroscopic sterilization: a perfect storm

Over the past several years, the commercial status of the Essure Coil, a permanent hysteroscopic sterilization device, has switched from assured to pressured. In July 2018, the device's manufacturer, Bayer Healthcare, announced that it would halt sales in the United States (the last country in which the device has been offered) by year's end. This decision was prompted by years of declining sales revenue and came after thousands of women filed complaints of adverse events, including device expulsion, uterine and tubal perforation, intractable pelvic pain, and bleeding necessitating hysterectomy, device-related death, unintended pregnancy and miscarriage, and a variety of other chronic symptoms (1).
Source: Fertility and Sterility - Category: Reproduction Medicine Authors: Tags: Inklings Source Type: research

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ConclusionsNon-JIA diagnosis, older age, and ANA-negativity were associated with symptomatic first-U in our study cohort, but no patient characteristics were significantly associated with symptomatic recurrence. Clinical patterns may change during disease course, with uveitis switching from symptomatic to asymptomatic, which has implications for uveitis monitoring recommendations.
Source: Journal of American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus - Category: Opthalmology Source Type: research
ConclusionCO2 absorption rates, anesthesiologists’ ability to maintain adequate etCO2, and postoperative shoulder pain did not differ based on insufflation system type or IAP. Surgeons’ rating of visualization of the operative field was significantly improved when using the valveless over the standard insufflation system.
Source: Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 26 June 2019Source: European Journal of Obstetrics &Gynecology and Reproductive BiologyAuthor(s): Christos Anthoulakis, Eirini Iordanidou, Soumela Kotsailidou, Aliki Pilavidi, Ioannis Chatzikalogiannis, Theodoros Theodoridis, Apostolos Mamopoulos
Source: European Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Reproductive Biology - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 25 June 2019Source: Gynecologic Oncology ReportsAuthor(s): Rodger Rothenberger, Amanda Jackson, Ady Kendler, Thomas Herzog, Caroline BillingsleyAbstractPerivascular epithelioid cell neoplasms (PEComas) are mesenchymal neoplasms originating from the perivascular epithelioid cell (PEC) line. The World Health Organization (WHO) further defines PEComa as “a mesenchymal tumor composed of histologically and immunohistochemically distinctive perivascular epithelioid cells”. Gynecologic PEComas account for approximately ¼ of the PEComa cases reported in the literature and are h...
Source: Gynecologic Oncology Reports - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
Objective There is no agreed upon standard way to measure vulvar lichen sclerosus disease severity. The Female Genital Self-Image Scale (FGSIS) is a validated survey tool assessing female genital self-image and is positively correlated with women's sexual function. A lower score represents a negative genital self-image. We evaluated the FGSIS in women with vulvar lichen sclerosus. Methods Women with biopsy-proven lichen sclerosus and women presenting for routine gynecologic care without lichen sclerosus matched by age were surveyed with the 7-item FGSIS. National surveys of healthy women in the United States have show...
Source: Journal of Lower Genital Tract Disease - Category: OBGYN Tags: Original Research Articles: Vulva and Vagina Source Type: research
Conclusions Wearing tight-fitting jeans or pants and removing hair from the mons pubis area were associated with increased odds of vulvodynia. Research on how hygienic practices could influence vulvar pain in larger and more temporally addressed populations is warranted.
Source: Journal of Lower Genital Tract Disease - Category: OBGYN Tags: Original Research Articles: Vulva and Vagina Source Type: research
Conclusion Hysteroscopic removal of RPOC is a feasible and safe management option of this complication of pregnancy. We strongly suggest avoiding performing blind procedures such as dilation and curettage and favor the adoption of this modality that allows the removal of retained products of conception under direct visualization.
Source: Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
Conclusion Hysteroscopic removal of RPOC is a feasible and safe management option of this complication of pregnancy. We strongly suggest avoiding performing blind procedures such as dilation and curettage and favor the adoption of this modality that allows the removal of retained products of conception under direct visualization.
Source: Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
Andrea Syrtash was first hospitalized at the age of 14 for painful and heavy menstrual cycles due to endometriosis. She had no idea her condition would affect her fertility ― and even if she had known, she may not have thought to address it without guidance from her doctors. After six years of trying to conceive, Syrtash, who’s now in her 40s and works as a relationship and dating expert, recently founded pregnantish, a website for singles, couples and LGBTQ people who are trying to conceive.  “When you’re a teenager, it’s not on your mind,” she said. Had she known, “I migh...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Abstract The article discusses possible effects of the use of analgesics during pregnancy. It summarizes the pertinent literature and reports some previously unpublished data from the Swedish Medical Birth Register. Most likely the use of analgesics does not cause spontaneous abortion. Only small malformation risk increases are seen after the use of opioids and perhaps non-steroid anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use. If possible, the latter should be avoided during the first trimester. If exposure has occurred there is no reason to consider an interruption of the pregnancy. Continued use of analgesics may increase ...
Source: Drugs - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
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