Can a home-testing kit tell me if I ’m menopausal? | Zoe Williams

It turns out that numbers don ’t necessarily tell the whole story•Fitness tips: what you need to know about perimenopause“Are you sure you want to do a home hormone test?” my editor asked. “Are you sure it’s not too personal?” Why would that be personal, I think. This is stuff I make without trying. It’s not even as revealing as keeping a food diary. Then two tests arrived from medical test-by-post company Thriva; one female baseline hormone test and one menopause test, so I realised that actually, yeah, that is pretty personal.There are a couple of reasons why someone might want to test. If you ’re trying to figure out why you’re not getting pregnant, you can wait a long time for investigations on the NHS. If you’re having menopausal symptoms, you might want to confirm the hunch so you can make a decision about hormone replacement therapy (HRT). If you ’re just curious... well, this is what happened with me.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Menopause Health & wellbeing Life and style Sport Fitness Society Reproduction Biology Fertility problems Source Type: news

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This study also found that Proteus DNA, a genus with many uropathogenic species (Drzewiecka, 2016), was more prevalent in women with OAB compared to asymptomatic controls (Curtiss et al., 2017). IC A recent study by Abernethy et al. suggested that the microbiome may play a role in IC (Abernethy et al., 2017). In this study, 16S rRNA analysis determined the microbiome of catheterized urine from women (n = 40) with IC was not dominated by a single genus and was less likely to contain Lactobacillus compared to asymptomatic women. Abernethy et al. also showed that L. acidophilus was associated with less severe scores on the ...
Source: Frontiers in cellular and infection microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
Maunil K. Desai1 and Roberta Diaz Brinton2,3* 1School of Pharmacy, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, United States 2Center for Innovation in Brain Science, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, United States 3Departments of Pharmacology and Neurology, College of Medicine, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, United States Women have a higher incidence and prevalence of autoimmune diseases than men, and 85% or more patients of multiple autoimmune diseases are female. Women undergo sweeping endocrinological changes at least twice during their lifetime, puberty and menopause, with many women undergoin...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Thrombotic and bleeding risks, as well as the incidence and presentation of cardiovascular events and related outcomes, appear to differ between genders, partly in relation to variability in age, comorbidities and body size.Women experience frequent fluctuations of pro-thrombotic activity during their lifetime, related to menstrual cycles, the use of oral contraceptives, pregnancy, menopause, and hormone replacement therapy, all with potential impact on the clinical manifestations of atherosclerotic disease.
Source: International Journal of Cardiology - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
Abstract We explored the strategy of frozen-thawed embryo transfer (FET) in the women with advanced maternal age (AMA). We first determined the age cut-off point of AMA by retrospective analysis of pregnancy outcomes in the patients undergoing FET. The patients with AMA were divided into 3 groups including natural cycle (NC) group, controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) group, and hormone replacement therapy (HRT) group, and simultaneously were divided into 2 groups including cleavage-stage embryo transfer (CET) group and blastocyst-stage embryo transfer (BET) group. The clinical pregnancy, embryo implantation, abor...
Source: Systems Biology in Reproductive Medicine - Category: Reproduction Medicine Authors: Tags: Syst Biol Reprod Med Source Type: research
In the U.S., two-thirds of people with Alzheimer’s disease are women, according to the Alzheimer’s Association. For decades, experts have explained the gender divide by the fact that women also tend to live longer than men, and the biggest risk factor for Alzheimer’s is age. “Everyone brushed it off to the fact that women were living longer,” says Rachel Whitmer, professor of epidemiology at University of California Davis. “Now science is saying, wait, that’s not the end of the story.” Pregnancy, according to two of the latest studies on the issue, may have something to do wi...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Brain healthytime Source Type: news
This study included 22,289 women in the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study. Data on age at menarche, pregnancy, parity, years of menstruation, oral contraceptive pill (OCP), menopausal status and hormone replacement therapy (HRT) were collected in 1990‐1994. Incidence of TKA during 2001‐2013 was determined by linking cohort records to the National Joint Replacement Registry. All analyses were adjusted for age, BMI at midlife, change in BMI (early reproductive age to midlife), country of birth, physical activity, smoking, and education. ResultsOver 12.7 years, 1,208 TKAs for osteoarthritis were identified. Ever pregna...
Source: Arthritis and Rheumatism - Category: Rheumatology Authors: Tags: Full Length Source Type: research
AbstractPurpose of ReviewThis review elucidates gender-based determinants of cardiovascular disease in an effort to answer common questions that arise for practitioners as they provide preventive care to women.Recent FindingsFive key topics are at the forefront of recent and ongoing research: (1) coronary microvascular dysfunction, (2) hormone replacement therapy, (3) breast arterial calcification, (4) calcium and vitamin D supplementation, and (5) metabolic considerations during pregnancy.SummaryMicrovascular dysfunction is a common cause of angina in women, and should be treated with the same rigor as macrovascular coron...
Source: Current Cardiovascular Risk Reports - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
Breast cancer is the most frequent cancer among women especially in the Western world where, despite improved survival, it is one of the leading causes of death (1). Furthermore, for several decades there has been an increase in incidence, though recently there seems to be a stabilization in risk or even a small decline in typical high-risk areas such as Europe and the USA but at the same time a steep increase in typical low-risk societies such as Japan (2). Breast cancer is often regarded as a singular disease, but recent discoveries are pointing to a variety of types of potentially different etiology. Thus, the female...
Source: Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health - Category: Occupational Health Tags: Editorial Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Until additional studies are performed, the risks and benefits must be weighed on an individual basis with consideration of prophylaxis when a decision is made to continue these medications in the perioperative period. Part of this decision making includes the risk of fetal harm in an unwanted pregnancy in preparation for nonobstetric surgery versus an increased risk of venous thromboembolism. PMID: 28969534 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Current Clinical Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: Curr Clin Pharmacol Source Type: research
Key content There have been a number of recent advances and an increase in the number of contraceptive methods available to perimenopausal women. Other relevant issues, including transition to and diagnosis of menopause, the use of hormone replacement therapy with contraception, and when to stop contraception, are discussed. Some hormonal contraceptives have added benefits in the management of common perimenopausal gynaecological problems. Research and development into intrauterine contraception, microchip drug release technology, progesterone receptor modulators, male contraception and vaccines is currently underway. ...
Source: The Obstetrician and Gynaecologist - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
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