After liver transplant for HCV, better antiviral results with cyclosporine

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - In patients transplanted for hepatitis C cirrhosis, the virus inevitably recurs. Now a new meta-analysis suggests that cyclosporine-based immunosuppression may be associated with a better response to antiviral therapy after transplant than tacrolimus-based protocols.
Source: Modern Medicine - Category: Journals (General) Source Type: news

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We report a case of hepatic hydrothorax in a 55-year-old female patient with HCV cirrhosis, which exhibited a spontaneous decrease in pleural effusion after direct antiviral agent (DAA) therapy. In cases of HCV cirrhosis, DAAs are worth administering before treatment by TIPS or liver transplantation. PMID: 32098464 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Korean J Gastroenter... - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Korean J Gastroenterol Source Type: research
Tingxin Wu1,2, Fenglei Li1,2, Yongyan Chen1,2, Haiming Wei1,2, Zhigang Tian1,2, Cheng Sun1,2,3* and Rui Sun1,2* 1Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale, The CAS Key Laboratory of Innate Immunity and Chronic Disease, Division of Molecular Medicine, School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, China 2School of Life Science, Institute of Immunology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, China 3Transplantation and Immunology Laboratory, The First Affiliated Hospital of University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, China The ability of ...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
How has the availability of direct-acting antiviral therapy impacted liver transplantation indications and waiting list outcomes in patients with chronic hepatitis C?Journal of Viral Hepatitis
Source: Medscape Transplantation Headlines - Category: Transplant Surgery Tags: Gastroenterology Journal Article Source Type: news
In this study, we assessed the impact of DAA on liver transplant indications in the UK and waiting list outcomes for patients with HCV. We as sessed UK adult elective liver transplant registrants between 2006 and 2017. The aetiology of liver disease at registration was reclassified using an accepted hierarchical system and changes were assessed over time and compared before and after the introduction of DAA. Registration UKELD scores and 1‐year waiting list outcomes were also compared. The proportion of waiting list patients registered with HCV‐related cirrhosis reduced after the introduction of DAA from 10.5% in 2013 ...
Source: Journal of Viral Hepatitis - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research
Journal of Viral Hepatitis,Volume 0, Issue ja, -Not available-.
Source: Journal of Viral Hepatitis - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Source Type: research
Optimal care for hepatitis virus –related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) would include eradication of tumor and elimination of hepatitis B virus (HBV) or hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Accomplishing these goals could prevent deaths from cancer or cirrhosis and reduce the likelihood of viral transmission. Tremendous progress h as recently been achieved for tumor and antiviral therapies. Long-term survival from cancer was previously a rarity. Now, partial hepatectomy, liver transplant, or tumor ablation provide 5-year survival rates of 45% to 80%. Direct-acting antivirals (DAA) can now prevent cirrhosis in patients...
Source: JAMA Surgery - Category: Sports Medicine Source Type: research
Publication date: December 2011Source: Digestive and Liver Disease Supplements, Volume 5, Issue 1Author(s): Marina BerenguerAbstractCirrhosis with/without hepatocellular carcinoma is the primary indication for liver transplantation (LT) in many countries. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) reinfection occurs universally resulting in HCV-graft disease with progression to cirrhosis in about one third of cases after 5 years. Graft failure secondary to recurrent HCV is now the most frequent cause of death, graft failure and need for retransplantation in these patients, with a cumulative risk of allograft failure due to recurrent disease ...
Source: Digestive and Liver Disease Supplements - Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research
Publication date: December 2011Source: Digestive and Liver Disease Supplements, Volume 5, Issue 1Author(s): Gonzalo Crespo, Zoe MariñoAbstractRecurrent hepatitis C after liver transplantation is a rapidly evolving condition in which fibrosis deposition is accelerated, with 30% of patients developing graft cirrhosis within the first 5 years after transplantation. Antiviral therapy after transplantation achieves sustained virological response (SVR) in approximately 30% of patients, and a milder fibrosis stage at treatment seems to increase the probabilities of response to treatment. Importantly, SVR to antiviral thera...
Source: Digestive and Liver Disease Supplements - Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research
Publication date: December 2011Source: Digestive and Liver Disease Supplements, Volume 5, Issue 1Author(s): Marina BerenguerAbstractCirrhosis with/without hepatocellular carcinoma is the primary indication for liver transplantation (LT) in many countries. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) reinfection occurs universally resulting in HCV-graft disease with progression to cirrhosis in about one third of cases after 5 years. Graft failure secondary to recurrent HCV is now the most frequent cause of death, graft failure and need for retransplantation in these patients, with a cumulative risk of allograft failure due to recurrent disease ...
Source: Digestive and Liver Disease Supplements - Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research
Publication date: December 2011Source: Digestive and Liver Disease Supplements, Volume 5, Issue 1Author(s): Gonzalo Crespo, Zoe MariñoAbstractRecurrent hepatitis C after liver transplantation is a rapidly evolving condition in which fibrosis deposition is accelerated, with 30% of patients developing graft cirrhosis within the first 5 years after transplantation. Antiviral therapy after transplantation achieves sustained virological response (SVR) in approximately 30% of patients, and a milder fibrosis stage at treatment seems to increase the probabilities of response to treatment. Importantly, SVR to antiviral thera...
Source: Digestive and Liver Disease Supplements - Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research
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