Frequently asked questions about measles

Download the flyer UCLA statement on measles case1. What is measles?Measles is a highly contagious disease that is caused by a virus that lives in the nose and throat. The symptoms of measles include:Fever   (101°F or higher)CoughRunny noseRed watery eyesRash of red spots. Some are slightly raised. Typically starts on the face or hairline and spreads to the rest of the body.Measles can lead to serious illnesses, hospitalization, and even death. Serious illnesses include:DiarrheaEar InfectionBrain Damage        Pregnant women, infants, young children, and persons with a weakened immune system are at the most risk for serious illnesses. There is no treatment for measles.2. How is measles spread?Measles spreads easily through the air when an infected person coughs or sneezes. About 9 out of 10 people who have not had the measles vaccine will get measles if they are exposed to the virus. You can get measles if you share the same air with a person with measles, even up to two hours after the person has left the area. Measles can also spread before the infected person has symptoms.3. Who is the Health Officer?The Health Officer is a physician appointed by the County Board of Supervisors who enforces laws and takes action to protect the community and prevent disease or injury. Law enforcement may work with the Health Officer, if needed, to enforce Orders that have been issued.4. Why am I receiving a Health Officer Order?You ’re recei...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

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(NEW YORK) — U.S. measles cases in 2019 have climbed to their highest level in 25 years in a resurgence largely attributed to misinformation that is turning parents against vaccines. New York City health officials on Wednesday reported 61 new cases since late last week, pushing this year’s nationwide tally past the 667 cases reported for all of 2014. That would make 2019 the worst year for measles since 1994. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention updates its national measles count on Mondays. CDC officials said they are reviewing the latest reports. Roughly three-quarters of this year’s illnesses...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized measles onetime Source Type: news
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog aka Tropical Travel Trouble 009 The diagnosis of HIV is no longer fatal and the term AIDS is becoming less frequent. In many countries, people with HIV are living longer than those with diabetes. This post will hopefully teach the basics of a complex disease and demystify some of the potential diseases you need to consider in those who are severely immunosuppressed. While trying to be comprehensive this post can not be exhaustive (as you can imagine any patient with ...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tags: Clinical Cases Tropical Medicine AIDS art cryptococcoma cryptococcus HIV HIV1 HIV2 PEP PrEP TB toxoplasma tuberculoma Source Type: blogs
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog aka Tropical Travel Trouble 008 Peer Reviewer Dr McBride ID physician, Wisconsin TB affects 1/3rd of the population and one patient dies every 20 seconds from TB. Without treatment 50% of pulmonary TB patients will be dead in 5 years. In low to middle income countries both TB and HIV can be ubiquitous, poor compliance can lead to drug resistance and malnourished infants are highly susceptible. TB can be very complex and this post will hopefully give you the backbone t...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tags: Clinical Cases Tropical Medicine Genexpert meningitis TB TB meningitis Tuberculosis Source Type: blogs
June 02, 2017In conflict areas around the world, health workers like Patrick in South Sudan continue to risk their lives to do their jobs.  “There were guns, bullets, and bombs everywhere,” says Patrick Hakim, a clinical officer inSouth Sudan.That was the scene around Juba last July after fighting broke out at the presidential compound between the Sudan People ’s Liberation Army (SPLA) and the SPLA in Opposition (SPLA-IO) forces.Amidst the country ’s already horrific and brutal conflict, Patrick says those two weeks were characterized by widespread terror. Many borders, roads, and markets were ...
Source: IntraHealth International - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Source Type: news
By COURTNEY GILDENGIL and LAURA FAHERTY On January 10th, then-President-elect Donald Trump met with Robert F. Kennedy Jr., a vocal skeptic of vaccine safety. Although the details and implications of the session are still unclear, the meeting and several of Trump’s tweets have raised questions among public health experts who wonder what, if anything, Trump might do on the issue as president. A chorus of celebrities and politicians continue to question vaccine safety and propagate a myth linking vaccines and autism, fueled by a fraudulent 1998 article by Dr. Andrew Wakefield that was later retracted. In 2014, RAN...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs
"Music festivals including Glastonbury have become a hotbed of measles this summer, Public Health England has warned," BBC News reports. The public health body have called on young people to check their vaccination status before attending an event. Public Health England (PHE) say there have been 38 suspected measles cases reported in people who attended events in June and July. As there are a number of big musical festivals coming up, such as the Reading Festival, there are concerns that there could be further outbreaks. What is measles? Measles is a highly infectious viral illness that can be ver...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Lifestyle/exercise Pregnancy/child QA articles Source Type: news
While it may not be the most widespread Zika conspiracy theory on the internet, it's certainly among the weirdest.  The fact-checking website Snopes revealed last Wednesday that at least a few people falsely believe Americans are immune to Zika virus, as these tweets demonstrate: @SpeakerRyan @WashTimes Say NO to more Obama requested FAKE #Zika virus funding. American immune systems are immune to it. Virus isn't new— Chad (@FlyOSUBuckeye1) May 22, 2016 @ABC dont spread propaganda about a non-existent threat to Americans Fake Zika war is a terrorist tactice— Barbara Adams (@SheSellsBoise) Ma...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news
An outbreak of measles in Arizona may continue to spread, health officials warn. The infectious virus was first detected at a federal detention center for immigrants in Eloy, Arizona when a detainee with measles was brought in, Joe Pyritz, Pinal County public information officer told HuffPost. The virus soon spread to a detention center staffer, Pyritz said, even though the staffer had previously been vaccinated against measles. The first two confirmed cases were made public on Thursday and as of Tuesday, that number had jumped to 11 confirmed cases. Currently, seven detainees and four staffers have bee...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news
And offer pregnant women pertussis jab earlier for better immunity – at 16-32 weeksRelated items from OnMedicaA fifth of children with persistent cough have whooping coughPregnant women set to continue to receive pertussis vaccination Measles vaccine protects against additional diseasesCheck your MMR status, public health doctors say
Source: OnMedica Latest News - Category: UK Health Source Type: news
The world is in a frenzy over the Zika virus. Researchers established a link between its rise in Brazil and cases of congenital microcephaly in babies of infected pregnant women, with infants born with smaller than expected heads and improper brain development. As of November last year, Brazil's northeastern state of Pernambuco recorded 646 babies born with microcephaly. On February 1, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared the virus and its suspected link to birth defects an international public health emergency. Though we don't yet understand the exact relationship between Zika and microcephaly, there is clear cau...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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