Neuroimmunology of Human T-Lymphotropic Virus Type 1-Associated Myelopathy/Tropical Spastic Paraparesis

Conclusion Recent advances in research on HTLV-1 provide better understanding of the molecular pathogenesis and mechanisms of HAM/TSP, and several clinical trials of novel therapies for patients with HAM/TSP have been initiated. However, long-term improvement of motor disability and quality of life still have not been achieved in HAM/TSP patients, and the clinical management remains challenging. Given that HAM/TSP is characterized by activated T-cells in both the periphery and CNS, studies in HAM/TSP will be highly informative for clarifying the pathogenesis of other neuroinflammatory disorders such as multiple sclerosis. Novel approaches will be required to better define host-virus interactions and host immune response underlying the pathogenesis of HAM/TSP. Author Contributions SN wrote the manuscript, and SJ supervised and contributed to the discussion and writing. Funding SN was supported by the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science – JSPS-NIH Research Fellowship Program. Conflict of Interest Statement The authors declare that the research was conducted in the absence of any commercial or financial relationships that could be construed as a potential conflict of interest. References Abdelbary, N. H., Abdullah, H. M., Matsuzaki, T., Hayashi, D., Tanaka, Y., Takashima, H., et al. (2011). Reduced Tim-3 expression on human T-lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) Tax-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes in HTLV-I infection. J. Infect. Dis. 203, 9...
Source: Frontiers in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research

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Source: Annals of Hematology - Category: Hematology Source Type: research
AbstractNodal peripheral T cell lymphomas (nPTCL) present aggressive clinical course, and its heterogeneous nature and poor prognosis with current therapeutic strategies make it a target for the development of new prognostic markers. Thus, we investigated tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) according to the number of cells expressing CD68 in biopsies and the absolute monocyte count (AMC) in peripheral blood of 87 patients with nPTCL. The median overall survival (OS) was 3  years (95% CI 1.3–8.4 years) and estimate 5 years OS of 43.3% (95% CI 32.5–53.7%). The median progression-free survival (PFS) ...
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Source: Annals of Hematology - Category: Hematology Source Type: research
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By designing a PDA that not only appeals to patients, but also is friendly to physicians, researchers appear to have crossed the threshold of making something that's adoptable, one observer says.Medscape Medical News
Source: Medscape Hiv-Aids Headlines - Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Cardiology News Source Type: news
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Source: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Original article Source Type: research
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Source: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research
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Source: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Original article Source Type: research
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