Even a Little More Exercise Might Help Your Brain Stay Young

Title: Even a Little More Exercise Might Help Your Brain Stay YoungCategory: Health NewsCreated: 4/19/2019 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 4/22/2019 12:00:00 AM
Source: MedicineNet Alzheimer - Category: Geriatrics Source Type: news

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Regardless of how much genetic risk someone has, a good diet, adequate exercise, limiting alcohol and not smoking made dementia less likely
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
The identification of mutations in the amyloid precursor protein (APP) and PSEN1 and PSEN2 that cause autosomal dominantly inherited Alzheimer ’s disease (AD) and result in increased production of aggregation-prone forms of amyloid-β (Aβ) established beyond a doubt that APP processing and the production of Aβ peptides are intimately involved in the disease process and led to the proposal of and support for the amyloid cascade hypothes is for AD (1,2). Despite its strengths, the amyloid cascade hypothesis is incomplete without addressing the essential role of amyloid-associated proteins [for reviews, see (3,4)].
Source: Biological Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Commentary Source Type: research
Alzheimer ’s disease (AD) is characterized by the hallmark pathologies of amyloid-β (Aβ) plaques and tau tangles. Recently, many drug trials and much research have focused on preventing or removing these pathologies, especially Aβ. While some trials have been able to effect change in amyloid levels, none have succeeded in improving cognition. Although the trials may have involved patients that were too advanced for benefit with antiamyloid therapies, an inability of these drugs to protect synaptic function may have contributed to their failure.
Source: Biological Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Commentary Source Type: research
With the advances of modern medicine, people are living longer than ever before worldwide. Consequently, an increase in patients with dementia has become a serious social concern, with Alzheimer ’s disease (AD) being the most common form of dementia. In 2015, the World Alzheimer Report estimated that approximately 46.8 million people had AD and other types of dementia worldwide. Accordingly, the number of such patients is predicted to increase to more than 131.5 million by the year 2050. Therefore, the development of new therapeutic alternatives to control AD progression and even reverse the disease is urgently needed.
Source: Biological Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Commentary Source Type: research
Even if you are unlucky enough to carry genes that predispose you to Alzheimer's disease, a healthy lifestyle can minimize that risk, new research shows.
Source: WebMD Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Scientists are closing in on a long-sought goal _ a blood test to screen people for possible signs of Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia
Source: ABC News: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news
Multisensory impairment may serve as a potential marker to help identify older adults at increased risk of developing dementia or Alzheimer disease.Medscape Medical News
Source: Medscape Psychiatry Headlines - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news
Conclusions: Overall, Periventricular WMHs of grade 2 and over were seen in 19/34 patients, and in 7/24 controls (P value 0.044). Significantly higher grades of PVWMHs were seen in hypertensives as compared to nonhypertensives in the case group, and in women compared to men. In the control group, hypertension had no effect on severity of PVWMHs. Among both Diabetics and non-diabetics, no difference in PVWMHs was found between the case and control groups. DWMHs were, conversely, seen only in the control group. Overall, over a quarter of cognitively normal older persons had WM hyperintensities of grade 2 and over on MRI brai...
Source: Journal of the Association of Physicians of India - Category: General Medicine Tags: J Assoc Physicians India Source Type: research
LOS ANGELES (AP) — Scientists are closing in on a long-sought goal — a blood test to screen people for possible signs of Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia. On Monday at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference, half a dozen research groups gave new results on various experimental tests, including one that seems 88% accurate at indicating Alzheimer’s risk. Doctors are hoping for something to use during routine exams, where most dementia symptoms are evaluated, to gauge who needs more extensive testing. Current tools such as brain scans and spinal fluid tests are too ex...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News Alzheimer's Disease Dementia Source Type: news
New research suggests that making healthful lifestyle choices can offset the genetic risk of developing Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Alzheimer's / Dementia Source Type: news
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