FDA Approves First Medical Device To Treat ADHD In Children

(CNN) — The first medical device to treat childhood attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, or ADHD, was OK’d Friday by the US Food and Drug Administration. Designated for children ages 7 to 12 who are not currently on medication for the disorder, the device delivers a low-level electrical pulse to the parts of the brain responsible for ADHD symptoms. “This new device offers a safe, non-drug option for treatment of ADHD in pediatric patients through the use of mild nerve stimulation, a first of its kind,” Carlos Peña, director of the Division of Neurological and Physical Medicine Devices in the FDA’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health, said in a statement. Called the Monarch external Trigeminal Nerve Stimulation System, eTNS,and marketed by NeuroSigma, the treatment is only available by prescription and must be monitored by a caregiver. The pocket-sized device is connected by wire to a small adhesive patch placed on the child’s forehead above the eyebrows. Designed to be used at home while sleeping, it delivers a “tingling” electrical stimulation to branches of the cranial nerve that delivers sensations from the face to the brain. A clinical trial of 62 children showed that the eTNS increases activity in the regions of the brain that regulate attention, emotion and behavior, all key components of ADHD. Compared to a placebo, children using the device had statistically significant improvement in their ADHD sympto...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News CNN ADHD Source Type: news

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ConclusionThus our results showed that higher IL-37 was associated with increased insulin sensitive in elderly type 2 DM patients through suppressing the gut microbiota dysbiosis.
Source: Molecular Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 24 June 2019Source: Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology and Biological PsychiatryAuthor(s): Xinyu Fang, Yan Chen, Yewei Wang, Juanjuan Ren, Chen ZhangAbstractObjectivesDepressive symptoms are commonly seen in schizophrenia. Increasing evidence implicates that both SIRT1 and BDNF closely related to the development of depression. So we here aimed to explore the effect of BDNF and SIRT1 on the depressive symptoms, and also explore the hazard factors for the depression in schizophrenia.MethodsA group of 203 participants (case/controls, 174/29) was recruited in the present work. Significant d...
Source: Progress in Neuro Psychopharmacology and Biological Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
ConclusionReassurance seeking appears to be a common factor across anxiety disorders though the themes of the reassurance may differ. Further, reduction in excessive reassurance seeking may be an important component in treatment outcome.
Source: Journal of Anxiety Disorders - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
This study shows that it is possible to evoke NMDA-dependent epileptiform activity in prefrontal cortex pyramidal neurons in vitro.We suggest that the prefrontal cortex is a good region for studying the influence of drugs on interictal epileptiform activity.Graphical abstract
Source: Neuroscience Letters - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 22 June 2019Source: Neuroscience LettersAuthor(s): Nastaran Rahimi, Mahsa Hassanipour, Fatemeh Yarmohammadi, Hedyeh Faghir-Ghanesefat, Nastaran Pourshadi, Erfan Bahramnejad, Ahmadreza DehpourAbstractThe neuro-protective effects of rubidium and lithium as alkali metals have been reported for different central nervous system dysfunctions including mania and depression. The aim of this study was evaluating as well as comparing the effects of rubidium chloride (RbCl) and lithium chloride (LiCl) on different seizures paradigms in mice and determining the involvement of NMDA receptors and nitre...
Source: Neuroscience Letters - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
by Michael D. Ehlers, MD, PhD Dr. Ehlers is with Biogen in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Innov Clin Neurosci. 2018;15(3–4):15–16 Funding: No funding was received for the preparation of this article. Disclosures: Dr. Ehlers is an employee and shareholder at Biogen Inc. in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Prominent and expensive failures in Alzheimer’s disease therapies have led to a contagious belief system in some parts of the biopharma industry that neuroscience is just too hard, too risky, and too uncertain. But, might this belief system itself be a residual bias of the past? Close inspection reveals all the signs...
Source: Innovations in Clinical Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Commentary Current Issue Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 26 October 2017 Source:Epilepsy & Behavior Author(s): Andres M. Kanner, Helen Scharfman, Nathalie Jette, Evdokia Anagnostou, Christophe Bernard, Carol Camfield, Peter Camfield, Karen Legg, Ilan Dinstein, Peter Giacobe, Alon Friedman, Bernd Pohlmann-Eden Epilepsy is a neurologic condition which often occurs with other neurologic and psychiatric disorders. The relation between epilepsy and these conditions is complex. Some population-based studies have identified a bidirectional relation, whereby not only patients with epilepsy are at increased risk of suffering from some of these neur...
Source: Epilepsy and Behavior - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
iev G Abstract The neuroimmune system represents a dense network of biochemical signals associated with neurotransmitters, neuropeptides, neurohormones, cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors synthesized in neurons, glial cells and immune cells, to maintain systemic homeostasis. Endogenous and/or exogenous, noxious stimuli in any tissue are captured by sensor cells to inform the brain; likewise, signals originating at the central nervous system (CNS) level are transmitted to peripheral immune effectors which react to central stimuli. This multidirectional information system makes it possible for the CNS to resp...
Source: Epilepsy Curr - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Curr Pharm Des Source Type: research
ConclusionsIn this large birth cohort, there were no significant associations between preschool eczema and medications for ADHD, depression/anxiety/phobia, migraine or epilepsy at school age.This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Source: Pediatric Allergy and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Original Source Type: research
Co-morbid conditions frequently occur in pediatric headaches and may significantly affect their management. Co-morbidities that have been associated with pediatric headaches include attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, autism, developmental disabilities, depression, anxiety, epilepsy, obesity, infantile colic, atopic disorders, inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome. The goal of this review is to elucidate common comorbidities associated with pediatric headache, thereby empowering child neurologists to identify common triggers and tailor management strategies that address headache and associated comorbidities.
Source: Seminars in Pediatric Neurology - Category: Neurology Authors: Source Type: research
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