Statement from Peter Marks, M.D., Ph.D., director of FDA ’s Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, on FDA’s continued confidence in the safety and effectiveness of the measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine

The FDA wants to underscore our continued confidence in the safety and effectiveness of the vaccines that are highly successful at preventing – in some cases, nearly eradicating – preventable diseases. Large well-designed studies have confirmed the safety and effectiveness of the MMR vaccine and have demonstrated that administration of the vaccine is not associated with the development of autism. MMR vaccine has been approved in the U nited States for nearly 50 years to prevent measles, mumps and rubella (also known as German Measles). As a result of its use, measles and rubella were completely eradicated in the United States, and mumps cases decreased by 99%.
Source: Food and Drug Administration - Category: American Health Source Type: news

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(VANCOUVER, Wash.) — Parents in Washington state will no longer be able to claim a personal or philosophical exemption for their children from receiving the combined measles, mumps and rubella vaccine before attending a day care center or school under a measure signed Friday by Gov. Jay Inslee. The state saw more than 70 cases of measles this year, and Inslee signed the bill at Vancouver City Hall, in the county where most of those cases were centered. The new law takes effect at the end of July. Inslee said that while the bill was an important step in public health, he warned it doesn’t do “everything ne...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized measles onetime washington Source Type: news
Anti-vaccination movements lure increasingly more people into skipping potentially life-saving immunization against infectious diseases, such as measles, mumps, or rubella, highly impairing herd immunity for entire communities. Social media platforms could restrict the reach of anti-vax messages, groups, and activities, with algorithms recommending tailor-made content and health apps providing information about vaccinations. Here’s our collection of the most recent steps and digital tools supporting the fight against anti-vaccination and its believers. 300 percent increase in measles globally In a widely shared...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Empowered Patients Future of Medicine anti-vaccination anti-vax anti-vaxxer digital disease disease outbreak facebook figth Health Healthcare infection Innovation measles movement social media technology Source Type: blogs
Lawmakers in Germany are considering a new law that would fine parents if their children aren’t vaccinated against measles. The Guardian reports that the draft law would make vaccinations mandatory for any child attending nurseries or schools, as well as teachers, educators and medical staff. Failure to comply could result in fines of up to US$2,800. If approved this year, the law would go into effect by March 1, 2022, and would require parents to provide proof of their children’s vaccination by mid-2020. The proposed measure comes amid a global resurgence of the respiratory illness that has been driven in part...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Uncategorized Germany onetime overnight Source Type: news
The Church of Scientology’s cruise ship Freewinds with 300 passengers aboard has been quarantined in port by the Caribbean nation of St. Lucia for measles after a female crew member was diagnosed with the highly contagious, preventable disease. MarineTraffic.com lists the vessel in port at St. Lucia as the Freewinds. A ship with that name is owned by a Panamanian company linked to the Church of Scientology. NBC News also reported that a St. Lucia coast guard official confirmed that the quarantined vessel belonged to the church. The Church of Scientology did not respond to TIME’s requests for comment. St. Luci...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Infectious Disease onetime Travel Source Type: news
Measles is a highly contagious disease caused by a virus. It spreads through the air when an infected person coughs or sneezes – the kicker is this can happen 2 hours AFTER said person has left the room. Measles starts with a fever; soon after, it causes a cough, runny nose, and red eyes. Then a rash of tiny, red spots breaks out which starts at the head and spreads to the rest of the body.It is important to recognize that fever and rash are extremely common in children and the vast majority of fever/rash cases will not be Measles.Unless you are reading about local cases of Measles in the news – it is high...
Source: A Pediatrician's Blog - Category: Pediatrics Source Type: blogs
(NEW YORK) — U.S. measles cases in 2019 have climbed to their highest level in 25 years in a resurgence largely attributed to misinformation that is turning parents against vaccines. New York City health officials on Wednesday reported 61 new cases since late last week, pushing this year’s nationwide tally past the 667 cases reported for all of 2014. That would make 2019 the worst year for measles since 1994. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention updates its national measles count on Mondays. CDC officials said they are reviewing the latest reports. Roughly three-quarters of this year’s illnesses...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized measles onetime Source Type: news
by Gertrud U. Rey In 1998, a British doctor named Andrew Wakefield published a paper in the British journal The Lancet. In this paper, Wakefield implied that the measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine may cause developmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The paper received wide publicity, and subsequently, MMR vaccination rates began […]
Source: virology blog - Category: Virology Authors: Tags: Basic virology Information autism measles MMR mumps peter hotez rubella vaccines viral virus viruses Source Type: blogs
Do vaccines cause autism? Is it OK to skip certain vaccines? Get the facts on these and other common questions. Childhood vaccines protect children from a variety of serious or potentially fatal diseases, including diphtheria, measles, mumps, rubella, polio, tetanus, whooping cough (pertussis) and others. If these diseases seem uncommon -- or even unheard of [...]
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news
A 10-year study of more than 650,000 children found no link between the measles, mumps and rubella vaccination series given to children and an increased risk of autism. The study of Danish children born to Danish mothers published in the medical journal Annals of Internal Medicine agrees with earlier studies in concluding that there was no overall increased risk of developing autism among children who received the vaccine compared to those who did not, even if th ey had a sibling with autism, U.S.…
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Source Type: news
A study of 650,000 children has confirmed yet again that the measles, mumps and rubella vaccine does not increase the risk of getting autism
Source: New Scientist - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research
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