Scientists Restore Some Brain Activity in Recently Slaughtered Pigs

(NEW YORK) — Scientists restored some activity within the brains of pigs that had been slaughtered hours before, raising hopes for some medical advances and questions about the definition of death. The brains could not think or sense anything, researchers stressed. By medical standards “this is not a living brain,” said Nenad Sestan of the Yale School of Medicine, one of the researchers reporting the results Wednesday in the journal Nature. But the work revealed a surprising degree of resilience among cells within a brain that has lost its supply of blood and oxygen, he said. “Cell death in the brain occurs across a longer time window than we previously thought,” Sestan said. Such research might lead to new therapies for stroke and other conditions, as well as provide a new way to study the brain and how drugs work in it, researchers said. They said they had no current plans to try their technique on human brains. The study was financed mostly by the National Institutes of Health. The 32 brains came from pigs killed for food at a local slaughterhouse. Scientists put the brains into an apparatus in their lab. Four hours after the animals died, scientists began pumping a specially designed blood substitute through the organs. The brains showed no large-scale electrical activity that would indicate awareness. Restoring consciousness was not a goal of the study, which was aimed instead at exploring whether particular functions might be restored long...
Source: TIME: Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Brain Activity onetime Source Type: news

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Authors: Ye MB, Chen YL, Wang Q, An J, Ye F, Jing P Abstract OBJECTIVES: Stroke is a common condition after a transient ischemic attack (TIA) or minor ischemic stroke (IS). Adding clopidogrel to aspirin may yield more beneficial outcomes than aspirin mono-therapy; meanwhile, the risk of bleeding in the acute phase remains poorly understood. Therefore, there is increasing emphasis on the risks and benefits of clopidogrel with aspirin compared with aspirin mono-therapy in an effort to treat TIA/IS. DESIGN: We searched several electronic databases, including PubMed, Cochrane, and Embase, to identify eligible rando...
Source: Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal - Category: Cardiology Tags: Scand Cardiovasc J Source Type: research
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Source: Techniques in Hand and Upper Extremity Surgery - Category: Surgery Tags: Techniques Source Type: research
(NEW YORK) — Scientists restored some activity within the brains of pigs that had been slaughtered hours before, raising hopes for some medical advances and questions about the definition of death. The brains could not think or sense anything, researchers stressed. By medical standards “this is not a living brain,” said Nenad Sestan of the Yale School of Medicine, one of the researchers reporting the results Wednesday in the journal Nature. But the work revealed a surprising degree of resilience among cells within a brain that has lost its supply of blood and oxygen, he said. “Cell death in the brai...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Uncategorized Brain Activity onetime Source Type: news
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Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Economics Health disparities Health Policy American healthcare Etienne Deffarges Mediterranean Diet Opioids world health Source Type: blogs
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Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
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Source: Mass Device - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Blog IMARC Source Type: news
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Source: Mr. Hassle's Long Underpants - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tags: Life Triathlon Training Source Type: blogs
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Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Back Pain Drugs and Supplements Headache Health Heart Health Injuries Pain Management Source Type: blogs
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Source: Innovations in Clinical Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Behavioral and Cognitive Neurology Child Adol Mental Disorders Cognition Current Issue Medical Issues Neurologic Systems and Symptoms Psychiatry Psychopharmacology Review Substance Use Disorders Cannabis dependence drug-related har Source Type: research
By JOSEPH KRAININ, M.D. His voice had the unusual ability to convey both aggressive muscularity and profound vulnerability. Scott Weiland and Stone Temple Pilots were icons of my adolescence. Personally, my memory of Mr. Weiland will always be inextricably linked with “Plush,” that initial hit single which, upon first listen, instantly captivated me and thousands of other kids like me. During my high school days, “Plush” was elevated to the highest sonic status possible, joining Metallica’s “Enter Sandman” and Pearl Jam’s” Black” as an essential component of our f...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: THCB Pain Scott Weiland Stone Template Pilots Source Type: blogs
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