Including Lifestyle Medicine in Medical Education: Rationale for American College of Preventive Medicine/American Medical Association Resolution 959

Publication date: May 2019Source: American Journal of Preventive Medicine, Volume 56, Issue 5Author(s): Jennifer Trilk, Leah Nelson, Avery Briggs, Dennis MuscatoIntroduced by the American College of Preventive Medicine and released by the American Medical Association House of Delegates in 2017, Resolution 959 (I-17) supports policies and mechanisms that incentivize and/or provide funding for the inclusion of lifestyle medicine education and social determinants of health in undergraduate, graduate and continuing medical education. Resolution 959 was passed to help address the current healthcare costs of lifestyle-related, noncommunicable chronic diseases that exert a devastating economic burden on the U.S. healthcare system. Approximately 86% of $2.9 trillion is spent annually on obesity, cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and some cancers, with very poor return on investment for health outcomes. Lifestyle medicine provides an evidence-based solution to the noncommunicable chronic disease epidemic; however, medical education in lifestyle medicine is minimal to nonexistent. This paper provides the case for healthcare innovation to include lifestyle medicine in the prevention and treatment of noncommunicable chronic diseases. Our medical education system recommendation is to provide lifestyle medicine training for prevention and treatment of noncommunicable chronic diseases. Exemplar lifestyle medicine schools are showcased and guidance for reform is highlighted that can b...
Source: American Journal of Preventive Medicine - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Related Links:

Hongxiao Jiao1, Yong Zang2, Miaomiao Zhang2, Yuan Zhang2, Yaogang Wang3, Kai Wang4,5*, R. Arlen Price6* and Wei-Dong Li2* 1Research Center of Basic Medical Sciences, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin, China 2Department of Genetics, College of Basic Medical Sciences, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin, China 3College of Public Health, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin, China 4Raymond G. Perelman Center for Cellular and Molecular Therapeutics, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, United States 5Laboratory Medicine, Department of Pathology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, ...
Source: Frontiers in Genetics - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: research
Ali Mahzari1, Songpei Li1, Xiu Zhou1,2, Dongli Li2, Sherouk Fouda1, Majid Alhomrani1, Wala Alzahrani1, Stephen R. Robinson1 and Ji-Ming Ye1,2* 1Lipid Biology and Metabolic Disease Laboratory, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia 2School of Biotechnology and Health Sciences, Wuyi University, Jiangmen, China The present study investigated the effects of matrine on non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) in mice induced by a methionine choline-deficient (MCD) diet and the mechanism involved. The study was performed in C57B/6J mice fed a MCD diet for 6 weeks to induce NAS...
Source: Frontiers in Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
Abstract Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remains a deadly disease with no efficacious treatment options. PDAC incidence is projected to increase, which may be caused at least partially by the obesity epidemic. Significantly enhanced efforts to prevent or intercept this cancer are clearly warranted. Oncogenic KRAS mutations are recognized initiating events in PDAC development, however, they are not entirely sufficient for the development of fully invasive PDAC. Additional genetic alterations and/or environmental, nutritional, and metabolic signals, as present in obesity, type-2 diabetes mellitus, and inflam...
Source: World Journal of Gastroenterology : WJG - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: World J Gastroenterol Source Type: research
Dan Hu1†, Meijin Zhang2†, Hejun Zhang1, Yan Xia1, Jinxiu Lin2, Xiongwei Zheng1, Feng Peng2* and Wenquan Niu3* 1Department of Pathology, Fujian Cancer Hospital &Fujian Medical University Cancer Hospital, Fuzhou, China 2Department of Cardiology, First Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou, China 3Institute of Clinical Medical Sciences, China-Japan Friendship Hospital, Beijing, China Background and Objectives: Growing evidence indicates that metabolic syndrome confers a differential risk for the development and progression of many types of cancer, especially in the digestive tr...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Study finds substantial numbers of young people at risk of liver cancer, diabetes and heart attacksExperts are warning that high levels of fatty liver disease among young people, caused by being overweight, could signal a potential public health crisis.Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is fairly common among older adults, detectable in about a quarter of the population. But a study has found that substantial numbers of 24-year-olds are also affected, putting them at risk of serious later health problems, such as liver cancer, type-2 diabetes and heart attacks.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Obesity UK news Medical research Diets and dieting Health Society Life and style Science Source Type: news
Guangwen Luo1†, Bailiang Li1†, Cailu Yang2†, Yutang Wang1, Xin Bian1, Wan Li1, Fei Liu1 and Guicheng Huo1* 1Key Laboratory of Dairy Science, Ministry of Education, College of Food Science, Northeast Agricultural University, Harbin, China 2Department of Ultrasound, Maternal and Child Health Hospital of Dapeng New District, Shenzhen, China Modulating gut microbiota to promote host health is well recognized. Therefore, people consume dietary products containing traditional probiotics in wishing to improve their health, and they need more research-based advices on how to select products with sui...
Source: Frontiers in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
Type 2 diabetes numbers fuelled by obesity epidemic Related items fromOnMedica Type 2 diabetes in 10 times more young people than realised Diabetes will soon cost NHS £16.9bn Obesity as cause of cancer set to overtake smoking Poor diabetes education leading to health complications Child type 2 diabetes is a ‘wake-up call’ to the nation
Source: OnMedica Latest News - Category: UK Health Source Type: news
Midlife obesity has recently been identified as a global pandemic (1). Morbidities and mortalities attributable to excess adiposity include atherosclerosis, type 2 diabetes (T2D) (2), certain cancers (3), and dementia (4), each of which has reached epidemic proportions on its own. It is no exaggeration to state that T2D and...
Source: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Commentaries Source Type: research
The headlines are once again filled with advice to reduce egg and cholesterol consumption based on a study that found an association of egg and cholesterol consumption with increased risk for cardiovascular events. Sounds scary and persuasive, doesn’t it? After all, nearly 30,000 people were tracked over 17 years and the authors authoritatively declare that this proves that eggs and cholesterol are risk factors for heart disease. There are several problems with this assessment. It is emblematic of the studies that confuse people, yield wildly conflicting conclusions, are used to craft absurd and ineffective dietary g...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: News & Updates cholesterol eggs grain-free saturated fat undoctored wheat belly Source Type: blogs
The World Health Organization has classified obesity as an epidemic. Obesity (defined by body mass index) substantially increases a patient's lifetime risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus, as well as many other co-morbidities, including cancers and cardiovascular disease. Obesity is caused by multiple factors, which vary from patient to patient, but include obesogenic environment, genetics, medical, mental health and prescribed medications. Obesity appears to predispose patients to developing these multiple co-morbidities by interacting with metabolic and endocrinological processes, as well as exposing the body to i...
Source: Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Authors: Tags: Obesity Source Type: research
More News: American Medical Association (AMA) | Cancer | Cancer & Oncology | Cardiology | Cardiovascular | Continuing Medical Education | Diabetes | Diabetes Type 2 | Eating Disorders & Weight Management | Education | Endocrinology | Epidemics | Epidemiology | Funding | Graduation | Healthcare Costs | Heart | International Medicine & Public Health | Obesity | Training | Universities & Medical Training