First U.S. Patients Treated With CRISPR As Human Gene-Editing Trials Get Underway

This could be a crucial year for the powerful gene-editing technique CRISPR as researchers start testing it in patients to treat diseases such as cancer, blindness and sickle cell disease.(Image credit: Molekuul/Getty Images/Science Photo Library)
Source: NPR Health and Science - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Source Type: news

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DiscussionOur starting hypothesis was confirmed for the complication rate and clinical outcomes. The benefits of dual mobility cups are emphasized. While the indications for TFR are rare, they will likely increase in the coming years.Level of evidence: IV, Retrospective cohort study…
Source: Orthopaedics and Traumatology: Surgery and Research - Category: Orthopaedics Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 24 April 2019Source: Gynecologic Oncology ReportsAuthor(s): Brooke Liang, Sara S. Lange, L. Stewart Massad, Rebecca Dick, Kathryn A. Mills, Andrea R. Hagemann, Carolyn K. McCourt, Premal H. Thaker, Katherine C. Fuh, David G. Mutch, Matthew A. Powell, Lindsay M. KurokiAbstractObjectiveTo assess the renal outcomes of gynecologic oncology patients who present with hydronephrosis and acute kidney injury (AKI), have
Source: Gynecologic Oncology Reports - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
In conclusion, STH have shown a chemo-preventive action on different colon cancer cell models.Graphical abstract
Source: Journal of Functional Foods - Category: Nutrition Source Type: research
Background: The circadian timing system or circadian clock plays a crucial role in many biological processes, such as the sleep-wake cycle, hormone secretion, cardiovascular health, glucose homeostasis, and body temperature regulation. Energy balance is also one of the most important cornerstones of metabolic processes, whereas energy imbalance is associated with many diseases (i.e., obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease). Circadian clock is the main regulator of metabolism, and this analysis provides an overview of the bidirectional effect of circadian rhythm on metabolic processes and energy balance.Summary: The circ...
Source: Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism - Category: Nutrition Source Type: research
With the proposed changes to the Affordable Care Act (ACA), 20 million Americans are at risk of losing their health care coverage. A survey, conducted by Brunswick Partners, found that “75 percent of Americans agree that the proposed changes to Medicaid in the AHCA are a bad idea. And that we should not allow 14 million Americans to become uninsured even if there is a potential to reduce Medicaid spending. These results are significant because they find majorities of Americans identifying as conservatives (55 percent), moderates (82 percent) and liberals (90 percent) are opposed to the AHCA’s Medicaid pro...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
From portable genome sequencers until genetic tests revealing distant relations with Thomas Jefferson, genomics represents a fascinatingly innovative area of healthcare. As the price of genome sequencing has been in free fall for years, the start-up scene is bursting from transformative power. Let’s look at some of the most amazing ventures in genomics! The amazing journey of genome sequencing Genome sequencing has been on an amazing scientific as well as economic journey for the last three decades. The Human Genome Project began in 1990 with the aim of mapping the whole structure of the human genome and sequencing ...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Genomics Personalized Medicine AI artificial intelligence bioinformatics cancer DNA dna testing DTC gc3 genetic disorders genetics genome sequencing personal genomics precision medicine Source Type: blogs
The US health care system is increasingly focusing on value as a basis for reimbursement of pharmacotherapies and devices, and as a result the use of “value frameworks” for measuring and comparing treatment value has grown in recent years. However, the therapies assessed by most frameworks frequently apply to modest-to-large disease populations, rather than the smaller populations affected by rare diseases, where the factors driving value may differ. Rare diseases are different from diseases affecting larger populations in several fundamental ways. In the United States, a rare disease is defined as one that aff...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - Category: Health Management Authors: Tags: Costs and Spending Drugs and Medical Innovation Quality Orphan Drug Act Precision Medicine rare disease treatment treatment value value frameworks Source Type: blogs
[time-ad size=”large”] Table of ContentsPerson of the Year THE CHOICE DONALD TRUMP The Short List HILLARY CLINTON THE HACKERS RECEP TAYYIP ERDOGAN THE CRISPR PIONEERS BEYONCÉ Plus EUROPE’S POPULIST REVOLT ARE PRESIDENTS ALWAYS POY? 90 YEARS OF POY BY ALICE PARK Dr. Carl June’s lab at the University of Pennsylvania looks like any other biology research hub. There are tidy rows of black-topped workbenches flanked by shelves bearing boxes of pipettes and test tubes. There’s ad hoc signage marking the different workstations. And there are postdocs buzzing around, calibra...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: person of the year POY Source Type: news
STEM CELL PARTNERSHIP: Patient Advocates and Scientists at the International Society for Stem Cell Research Convention By Don C. Reed This year's International Society for Stem Cell Researchers (ISSCR) conference was enormous, three vast floors of San Francisco's magnificent Moscone West convention center. As a watering hole brings animals together, the ISSCR concentrates the world's top stem cell scientists. From around the world they came, four thousand of them this year, representing almost sixty countries. Interspersed with them were patients and patient advocates, those who would benefit most from scientific ad...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news
In the May issue of Health Affairs, two papers examine the potential for voucher systems to incentivize drug development in areas of unmet medical need. Co-authors Kevin Outterson and Anthony McDonnell take a look at potential exclusivity voucher programs designed to encourage development of new antibiotics, while David Ridley and Stephane Régnier analyze the effects that expansion of existing priority review voucher (PRV) programs may have on the value of PRVs as a development incentive. Ridley and Régnier’s work is of particular importance as both houses of Congress pursue a spate of legislative propo...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - Category: Health Management Authors: Tags: Costs and Spending Drugs and Medical Technology Featured Global Health Health Professionals Quality FDA FDAAA priority review rare diseases Source Type: blogs
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