A rasher of bacon 'ups cancer risk'

Eating even small amounts of red or processed meat increases the risk of bowel cancer, study finds.
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
(CNN) — Eating even a moderate amount of red or processed meat is linked with an increased risk of colorectal (bowel) cancer, according to a new study published Wednesday. People who ate 76 grams of red and processed meat per day — that’s in line with current guidelines and roughly the same as a quarter-pound beef burger –– had a 20% higher chance of developing colorectal cancer compared to others, who ate about 21 grams a day, the equivalent to one slice of ham, according to the research. The study also found that processed meat, like sausages or bacon, posed a bigger risk than red meat, with...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News Bacon Cancer CNN Source Type: news
People who eat 76 grams of processed meat a day gives them a 20 percent higher risk of getting bowel cancer compared to those who ate only 21 grams.
Source: Health News - UPI.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Eating even a moderate amount of red or processed meat is linked with an increased risk of colorectal (bowel) cancer, according to a new study published Wednesday.
Source: CNN.com - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
People more or less keeping to NHS guidelines at higher risk than those who eat littleEating even the moderate amounts of red and processed meat sanctioned by government guidelines increases the likelihood of developing bowel cancer, according to the largest UK study of the risks ever conducted.The Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) suggests anyone who eats more than 90g of red or processed meat per day should try to cut down to 70g or less, because of the known link with bowel cancer. TheNHS describes 90g of red meat as “equivalent to around three thinly cut slices of beef, lamb or pork, where each slice is...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Bowel cancer Medical research Meat UK news Health Science Society Food Source Type: news
Scientists at the University of Oxford compared the risk between people who stick to NHS guidelines on red and processed meat consumption - 70g a day - and those who don't.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Eating even small amounts of red or processed meat increases the risk of bowel cancer, study finds.
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Risk is raised in people eating just 76g of red and processed meat a day, which is roughly in line with government recommendations Related items fromOnMedica Lower cancer risk in people with higher vitamin D levels Cancer rates could rise due to growing intake of highly processed food Scientists equate wine to cigarette consumption to flag up cancer risk Obesity as cause of cancer set to overtake smoking Millennials top obesity chart before reaching middle age
Source: OnMedica Latest News - Category: UK Health Source Type: news
Dr Clare Stephens highlights the signs and symptoms of bowel cancer and explains how the screening programme is changing.
Source: GP Online Education - Category: Primary Care Tags: 15.2 Digestive Problems Source Type: news
ConclusionsCRC was correctly distinguished from adenomas or no bowel pathology using urinary VOC markers, within the bowel screening population. This pilot study demonstrates the potential of this method for CRC detection, with higher test uptake and superior sensitivity than FOBT. In addition, this is the first application of GC –IMS in CRC detection which has shown high test accuracy and usability.
Source: Techniques in Coloproctology - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
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