The risk of malignancy in uterine polyps: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

Publication date: Available online 15 April 2019Source: European Journal of Obstetrics &Gynecology and Reproductive BiologyAuthor(s): Anna Uglietti, Laura Buggio, Marilena Farella, Francesca Chiaffarino, Dhouha Dridi, Paolo Vercellini, Fabio ParazziniAbstractBackgroundEndometrial polyps are a common condition. The risk of malignancy has often led to an overtreatment with high health care costs and huge psychological distress.ObjectiveWe conducted a systematic review and a meta-analysis in order to estimate the prevalence of premalignant and malignant lesions in women undergoing hysteroscopic polypectomy.Data sourceWe developed the search using PubMed/MEDLINE and EMBASE databases to identify papers published between 2000- January 2019. The research strategy used on Pubmed was: (“polyps” (MESH) OR “endometrial polyp*”) AND (“malignancy” OR “cancer” OR “histopathology” OR “hysteroscopy” OR “ultrasound”, OR “sonohysterography”). The same search was modified for EMBASE.Study eligibilityWe included all observational retrospective and prospective studies and studies were selected for the review if they met following inclusion criteria: pre-operative diagnosis of benign-looking endometrial polyps at ultrasound examination or at hysteroscopy, excision of endometrial polyps via surgical hysteroscopy, histopathological diagnosis of benign polyps, or hyperplasia without atypia, or premalig...
Source: European Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Reproductive Biology - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research

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Objective: We analyzed tamoxifen use as a malignancy risk factor in women with endometrial polyps. Methods: This retrospective study included 675 women who underwent hysteroscopic polypectomy in 2010 to 2015 at the University of Campinas. Women were divided into tamoxifen use (nā€Š=ā€Š169) and no tamoxifen use (nā€Š=ā€Š506) groups. The primary outcome was endometrial cancer prevalence. Dependent variables included age, parity, years since menopause, presence of abnormal uterine bleeding, endometrial pattern on hysteroscopy, and endometrial thickness. Results: There were seven cases of endometrial cancer in the tamo...
Source: Menopause - Category: OBGYN Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research
We report a case of misdiagnosed endometrial cancer by D&C, but with a positive cytopathological finding. Following that, a meta-analysis including 4,179 patients of endometrial diseases with cyto-histopathological results was performed to assess the value of the endometrial cytological method in endometrial cancer diagnosis. The pooled sensitivity and specificity of the cytological method in detecting endometrial atypical hyperplasia or cancer was 0.91[95% confidence interval (CI) 0.74–0.97] and 0.96 (95% CI 0.90–0.99), respectively. The pooled positive likelihood ratio and negative likelihood ratio was 25.4 (...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Bleeding after menopause can be disconcerting, but the good news is, more than 90% of the time it’s not caused by a serious condition, according to a study in JAMA Internal Medicine. That said, the study also reinforces the idea that postmenopausal bleeding should always be checked out by your doctor to rule out endometrial cancer, a cancer of the uterine lining, says Dr. Ross Berkowitz, William H. Baker Professor of Gynecology at Harvard Medical School. This is because the study also found more than 90% of women who did have endometrial cancer had experienced postmenopausal bleeding. And screening all women who...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Source Type: blogs
ConclusionEvaluation of cases of perimenopausal and postmenopausal bleeding differentiated premalignant and malignant lesions of the uterine body, endometrium and cervix. As our centre is a Regional Cancer Centre of Bihar, incidence of malignant lesions is higher in our centre.
Source: The Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology of India - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
In this study, we aimed to estimate the frequency of premalignant and malignant lesions in endometrial polyps, and to evaluate associated clinical and demographic factors. A literature search was performed in major databases and the gray literature using the terms polyps OR endometrial polyp AND endometrial neoplasms OR endometrial cancer OR endometrial hyperplasia OR malignan*. Studies describing the frequency of premalignant and malignant lesions in endometrial polyps and any clinical or demographic factors associated with malignant lesions extracted using hysteroscopy were considered eligible. Independent investigators ...
Source: Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
The objective of our study was to estimate the frequency of pre-malignant and malignant lesions in endometrial polyps and to evaluate associated clinical and demographic factors. A literature search was performed in major databases and the gray literature using the terms polyps OR endometrial polyp AND endometrial neoplasms OR endometrial cancer OR endometrial hyperplasia OR malignan*. Studies describing the frequency of pre-malignant and malignant lesions in endometrial polyps and any clinical or demographic factors associated with malignant lesions extracted using hysteroscopy were considered eligible. Independent invest...
Source: Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
Conclusion The risk of a malignant lesion appears to be high (12%) in menopausal patients aged over 59 presenting an endometrial polyp detected when there is pre-existing AUB. In this situation, hysteroscopic resection of endometrial polyps should therefore be routinely proposed. For other patients, the risk of a malignant lesion is low but not insignificant, standing at about 3%. Each patient record should therefore be discussed on an individual case basis, taking into consideration the patient’s pre-existing conditions, after providing clear and appropriate information.
Source: European Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Reproductive Biology - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
By Stacy Simon Along with giving Mother's Day gifts and sending greetings this year, encourage the moms in your life to get up to date on cancer screening tests. Screening tests look for cancer before a person has any signs or symptoms. Regular screenings can catch some cancers early, when they’re small, have not spread, and are easier to treat. With cervical and colon cancers, these tests can even prevent cancer from developing in the first place. Sweeten the deal by offering to help your mom schedule her screening, drive her to and from appointments, and keep her company in the waiting room. These are the American ...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Prevention/Early Detection Breast Cancer Cervical Cancer Endometrial Cancer Colon/Rectum Cancer Lung Cancer - Non-Small Cell Source Type: news
CONCLUSION: Tamoxifen is a safe and reliable treatment of breast cancer, but data suggest an association with endometrial polyps, hyperplasia, metaplasia and carcinoma. One of the most common types of endometrial metaplasia is ciliated tubal metaplasia. It is generally known that endometrial tubal metaplasia is a benign disease. However studies propose endometrial tubal metaplasia to be a potential premalignant endometrial lesion and its association with endometrial hyperplasia and well-differentiated endometrioid carcinoma. We propose close monitoring of patients taking tamoxifen and prompt evaluation of any uterine bleed...
Source: Clinical Genitourinary Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Int J Clin Exp Pathol Source Type: research
Sourced from The Hysterectomy Association: Hysterectomy Association - Hysterectomy Association - hysterectomy, menopause and hormone replacement therapy (hrt) information and support for women. My story took off in October 2013 during an appointment with my doctor for something else entirely unconnected – eczema behind the ears. A chance mention in passing to my doctor that I had had an unexpected period the month before after a long gap caused her to prick up her ears. When was your last period before that? she enquired. I looked back at my diary where I log all my periods and body changes. I knew it had been more t...
Source: The Hysterectomy Association - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: Your Stories Complex Hyperplasia with Atypia endometrial cancer Source Type: news
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