Getting fewer than five hours a night increases risks of heart disease, strokes and early death

New York University published the study which looked into sleep and health after searching more than 8,000 websites, news reports and publications.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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(CNN) — Hey, sleepyheads. What you believe about sleep may be nothing but a pipe dream. Many of us have notions about sleep that have little basis in fact and may even be harmful to our health, according to researchers at NYU Langone Health’s School of Medicine, who conducted a study published Tuesday in the journal Sleep Health. “There’s such a link between good sleep and our waking success,” said lead study investigator Rebecca Robbins, a postdoctoral research fellow in the Department of Population Health at NYU Langone Health. “And yet we often find ourselves debunking myths, whether ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Healthwatch News CNN Sleep Source Type: news
Conclusions: Embolism associated with asymptomatic carotid stenosis shows circadian variation with highest rates 4–6 h before midday. This corresponds with peak circadian incidence of stroke and other vascular complications. These and ASED Study results show that monitoring frequency, duration, and time of day are important in ES detection. Introduction Transcranial Doppler (TCD) detected microembolism in the ipsilateral middle cerebral artery (MCA) may help stratify the risk of stroke and other arterial disease complications in persons with advanced (≥60%) asymptomatic carotid stenosis. If so, this techniqu...
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Sleep apnea isn't just an annoyance: It's also been tied to higher risks for heart disease, heart failure and stroke.
Source: WebMD Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
AbstractIntroductionAutomated office blood pressure (AOBP) has been recently shown to predict equally well to ambulatory blood pressure (ABP), conventional office blood pressure (OBP) and home blood pressure (HBP), cardiovascular (CV) events among hypertensives.AimTo compare AOBP recording and ABP monitoring in order to evaluate morning blood pressure (BP) peak in predicting CV events and deaths in hypertensives.MethodsWe assessed 236 initially untreated hypertensives, examined between 2009 and 2013. The end points were CV and non-CV death and any CV event including myocardial infarction, evidence of coronary heart disease...
Source: High Blood Pressure and Cardiovascular Prevention - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
Lilly Rocha was 37 years old in 2008 when she began having strange symptoms. When people asked her questions, she knew the answers but couldn’t articulate them. A tingling sensation on her left breast became painful. She thought she might have breast cancer, but her doctor assured her she was just experiencing stress from her demanding job. Her symptoms continued to get worse, and doctors continued to dismiss her. Three months later, at work, she became seriously ill. Luckily, her boss recognized the symptoms—chest and jaw pain and numbness in her left hand—and drove her to the nearest emergency room, whe...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized heart health Source Type: news
Exercise provides a remarkable variety of health benefits, which range from strengthening bones to positive effects on mood and helping to prevent chronic illnesses such as diabetes and heart disease. Research dating back to the late 1980s has consistently shown that aerobic fitness may help extend lives. Yet a few studies on athletes examining whether habitual vigorous exercise might harm the heart made some experts wonder how hard people ought to push when exercising (see here and here). Do cardiorespiratory fitness levels affect longevity? A retrospective study in JAMA attempts to answer this question. The study explore...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Exercise and Fitness Hypertension and Stroke Men's Health Women's Health Source Type: blogs
Sound, rhythm, rate, structure, function – countless features of the heart are measured to keep it healthy for as long as possible. Recently, an army of digital health technologies joined the forces of traditional preventive tools in cardiology to counter stroke, heart attack, heart failure or any other cardiovascular risks. In the future, minuscule sensors, digital twins, and artificial intelligence could strengthen their ranks. Let’s see what the future of cardiology might look like! Fitness trackers, chatbots and A.I. against heart disease Let’s say 36-year-old Maria living in Sao Paulo in 2033 d...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Artificial Intelligence in Medicine Future of Medicine Health Sensors & Trackers Portable Diagnostics cardiology cardiovascular cardiovascular diseases digital digital twin health trackers heart heart health heart rate heart soun Source Type: blogs
Alzheimer’s disease is a growing issue among Americans, but just 16% of seniors reported being regularly screened for cognitive issues, according to the Alzheimer’s Association’s new 2019 report. “There’s under-utilization of cognitive assessment in the clinical setting, and a disconnect between patient and provider over who should be initiating it,” says Joanne Pike, chief program officer at the Alzheimer’s Association. “[In] an ideal world, 100% of physicians initiate it, and 100% of seniors bring it up.” The new report finds that while the majority of doctors and sen...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Brain Source Type: news
This study examined 103 patients with bipolar 1 disorder who, despite taking a mood stabilizer, experienced frequent relapses. During a 12-month period, the group receiving cognitive therapy had significantly fewer bipolar episodes and reported less mood symptoms on the monthly mood questionnaires. They also had less fluctuation in manic symptoms. It’s normal to panic in the days and weeks your symptoms return; however, as you can see, there are many options to pursue. If the first approach doesn’t work, try another. Persevere until you achieve full remission and feel like yourself again. It will happen. Trust me on that.
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Antidepressant Bipolar Depression General Medications Manic Episode Mood Disorder Mood Stabilizer Relapse Source Type: blogs
(CNN) — Wake up, America, and raise your hand if you try to repair your exhausted body by sleeping in on weekends. A new study says the habit may not be such a good idea for your waistline — or your health. “Weekend catch-up sleep is not protective,” said Dr. Vsevolod Polotsky, director of sleep research at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. “The bottom line of this study is that even if you sleep longer on weekends, if you continue to sleep poorly, you will still eat too much, and you will still gain weight.” The common behavior of “sleeping in on the weekends doesn&...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News CNN Sleep Source Type: news
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