Esophageal Reflux Common After Sleeve Gastrectomy Esophageal Reflux Common After Sleeve Gastrectomy

About one in four patients will develop gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) after sleeve gastrectomy, but few will require conversion to gastric bypass for severe reflux, according to a systematic review and meta-analysis.Reuters Health Information
Source: Medscape General Surgery Headlines - Category: Surgery Tags: Gastroenterology News Source Type: news

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AbstractPurpose of ReviewKnowledge regarding postoperative outcomes after bariatric and metabolic surgery continues to evolve. This review highlights key findings in outcomes research over the last 5  years related to weight loss, remission of obesity-related disease, reflux, revisional surgery, robotic-assisted surgical platforms, and adolescent populations.Recent FindingsSleeve gastrectomy (SG) and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) produce similar weight loss patterns at 5  years, while duodenal switch (BPD/DS) and related procedures are associated with maximal weight loss overall and optimal resolution of obesit...
Source: Current Obesity Reports - Category: Eating Disorders & Weight Management Source Type: research
We present the first case report of benign oesophageal peptic stricture post-sleeve gastrectomy and its management. The management modalities for peptic stricture post-LSG include proton pump inhibitors, endoscopic dilatation and surgical management. Revisional Roux-en-Y gastric bypass along with optimal usage of serial dilatation and medical treatment has been shown to be an effective treatment for the same.
Source: Journal of Minimal Access Surgery - Category: Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
In the paper by Angrisani et  al. [1], the authors tackle an important question, namely, what are the long-term outcomes regarding gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in patients undergoing sleeve gastrectomy (SG)? Many surgeons consider GERD to be the Achilles’ heel of the SG, and it is one of the main reasons for conver sion of the SG to other procedures, such as the gastric bypass [2]. The last International Consensus Conference on SG demonstrated>50% of surgeons considered GERD to be a relative contraindication to the SG, and also hiatal hernias (HH) should be repaired when encountered [3].
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Editorial comment Source Type: research
In the paper by Angrisani et al, the authors tackle an important question, namely; what are the long term outcomes regarding gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in patients undergoing sleeve gastrectomy (SG) [1]? Many surgeons consider GERD to be the Achilles heel of the SG, and it is one of the main reasons for conversion of the SG to other procedures such as the gastric bypass [2]. The last International Consensus Conference on SG demonstrated that over 50% of surgeons considered GERD to be a relative contrindication to the SG, and also that hiatal hernias (HH) should be repaired when encountered [3].
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - Category: Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
Sleeve gastrectomy (SG) is associated with significant rates of de novo and worsened gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and thus, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is typically the preferred bariatric surgery in patients with symptomatic GERD. Patients with silent reflux symptoms, may however still undergo SG, which could put patients at risk for complications such as Barrett ’s esophagus (BE). We aimed to determine the incidence rate of BE in patients who have undergone SG and to assess the use of EGD pre- and post-surgery using a large database.
Source: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Poster abstracts Source Type: research
AbstractThis video shows the case of a 64-year-old morbidly obese woman, with a non-adjustable gastric band, who consulted for weight regain and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms and was converted to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). The operative technique included extensive lysis of adhesions, complete band dissection, partial gastrectomy of the fundus and body due to band erosion and conversion to RYGB.
Source: Obesity Surgery - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
Bariatric surgery is a proven, efficacious, and durable treatment for obesity and weight-related diseases. In addition to other metabolic effects, surgery can have both a positive and negative clinical impact on gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The spectrum of surgical procedures currently offered have varying degrees of improvement or worsening of preexisting symptoms or development of new symptoms. Of the most commonly performed bariatric procedures, Roux en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) has been shown to be highly effective in treatment of GERD [1], likely through a combination of weight loss and subsequent decrease of...
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Editorial comment Source Type: research
Bariatric surgery is a proven, efficacious, and durable treatment for obesity and weight-related diseases. In addition to other metabolic effects, surgery can have both a positive and negative clinical impact on GERD. The spectrum of surgical procedures currently offered have varying degrees of improvement or worsening of pre-existing symptoms or development of new symptoms. Of the most commonly performed bariatric procedures, Roux en-Y gastric bypass has been shown to be highly effective in treatment of GERD1, likely through a combination of weight loss and subsequent decrease of intra-abdominal pressure, as well as separ...
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - Category: Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
Conclusion: GERD may improve in obese patients who underwent laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG); however, the most favorable effect is likely to be found after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery. Prospero registration number: CRD42018090074.
Source: Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Research Article: Study Protocol Systematic Review Source Type: research
Obesity is well known to increase the risk of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The impact of sleeve gastrectomy (SG) on GERD is still discussed but seems to be associated with the development of de novo GERD or the exacerbation of preexisting GERD.
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Original article Source Type: research
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