The disturbing links between too much weight and several types of cancer

Being overweight or obese — long implicated in heart disease and diabetes — is now associated with getting at least 13 types of cancer.
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Source Type: news

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Are healthy habits worth cultivating? A recent study suggests healthy habits may help people tack on years of life and sidestep serious illnesses, such as diabetes and cancer. After all, if you’re going to gain an extra decade of life on this earth, you want to enjoy it! What did this research focus on? Researchers from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health looked at data from more than 73,000 women enrolled in the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS) who were followed for 34 years, and more than 38,000 men enrolled in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS) who were followed for 28 years. In a previous s...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Exercise and Fitness Health Healthy Aging Healthy Eating Men's Health Women's Health Source Type: blogs
Discussion of the Evolutionary Genetics of Aging Thymic Involution Contributes to Immunosenescence and Inflammaging The Potential for Exosome Therapies to Treat Sarcopenia Correlations of Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number and Epigenetic Age Measures Evidence for PASK Deficiency to Reduce the Impact of Aging in Mice The Aging Retina, a Mirror of the Aging Brain Evidence for Loss of Capillary Density to be Important in Heart Disease Aspects of Immune System Aging Proceed More Rapidly in Men Deacetylation of the NLRP3 Inflammasome as a Way to Control Chronic Inflammation Transplantation of Senescent Cells is an ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Telomerase gene therapy is considered in some quarters to be a viable treatment for aging. Telomeres are the caps of repeated DNA sequences at the ends of chromosomes. They are an important part of the mechanism limiting the number of times that somatic cells in the body can divide, the Hayflick limit. A little telomere length is lost with each cell division, and short telomeres trigger cellular senescence or programmed cell death, halting replication. Stem cell populations use telomerase to lengthen their telomeres and thus self-renew to provide a continual supply of new somatic daughter cells with long telomeres to repla...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs
In many workplaces, standing desks and walking meetings are addressing the health dangers of sitting too long each day, but for universities, the natural question is how to make such adjustments in  classrooms.The question appealed to emerita dance professor Angelia Leung from the UCLA Department of World Arts&Cultures/Dance. Sitting too long was never an issue for Leung ’s students. But for most college students, desk time is more common than dance time. In an unusual collaboration between the arts and sciences, Leung partnered with Burt Cowgill, an assistant adjunct professor with the UCLA Fielding School ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news
By ALYA AHMAD, MD Call it what you want, white privilege and health disparity appear to be two sides of the same coin. We used to consider ethnic or genetic variants as risk factors, prognostic to health conditions. However, the social determinants of health (SDOH) have increasingly become more relevant as causes of disease prevalence and complexity in health care. As a pediatric hospitalist in the San Joaquin Valley region, I encounter these social determinants daily. They were particularly evident as I treated a 12-year old Hispanic boy who was admitted with a ruptured appendix and developed a complicated abscess,...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health disparities Medical Practice Patients Alya Ahmad California health disparity health equity San Joaquin Valley SDoH Social Determinants of Health Source Type: blogs
In conclusion, this study suggests that epigenetic age acceleration is significantly associated with lung function in women older than 50 years. We hypothesised that this could be due to menopause. However, we have observed that menopause has minimal effect and therefore there is possibility of other unknown physiological factors at older age in females mediating the epigenetic age acceleration effect on lung function. While, it is still unknown what exactly epigenetic aging from DNA methylation measures, this study suggests it can be utilised as one of the important factors to assess women's lung health in old age. DNA me...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
This article addresses the pitfalls of the standard panel of liver function tests, discusses other non-invasive biomarkers and reviews imaging technologies which may revolutionise community-based diagnosis and stratification of chronic liver disease. PMID: 32097065 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: British Journal of Hospital Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Authors: Tags: Br J Hosp Med (Lond) Source Type: research
This study found an association between stroke risk and longer sleep, longer midday napping, or poor sleep quality. But an association is not the same as causation. Rather than longer sleep duration causing strokes, there are other possible explanations for the findings. For example, people who sleep more at night or nap more during the day may have other risk factors for stroke, such as: A higher incidence of depression. Excessive sleeping or poor sleep quality may be symptoms of depression, and prior studies have noted higher stroke rates among depressed individuals. A more sedentary lifestyle. Those who are not active ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Hypertension and Stroke Sleep Source Type: blogs
The majority of doctors will tell you that there is nothing you can do to reverse fatty liver and that health problems such as cirrhosis and liver failure may be in your future that they will address with the awful “solution” of liver transplant. The truth is the opposite: fatty liver is easily and readily reversible in virtually everybody, provided you take action before irreversible changes take place and are given the right information and tools. In this video, I discuss the three basic phenomena that drive fat deposition, liver damage, and inflammation that lead to this condition: Carbohydrate consumption ...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Open bowel flora carbohydrates carbs Inflammation NAFLD nash triglycerides undoctored wheat belly Source Type: blogs
This study provides strong evidence that following a healthy lifestyle can substantially extend the years a person lives disease-free." Commentary on Recent Evidence for Cognitive Decline to Precede Amyloid Aggregation in Alzheimer's Disease https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2020/01/commentary-on-recent-evidence-for-cognitive-decline-to-precede-amyloid-aggregation-in-alzheimers-disease/ I can't say that I think the data presented in the research noted here merits quite the degree of the attention that it has been given in the popular science press. It is interesting, but not compelling if its role...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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