The Big Number: 17.6 million Americans suffer from alcoholism

Beyond affecting everyday life functioning, alcohol abuse increases risk of cancer, liver cirrhosis, heart problems and stroke.
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Source Type: news

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U.S. News&World Report ’s newly released ranking of the nation's best children’s hospitals once again placed St. Louis Children’s Hospital in the top 50 in all 10 specialties it analyzes. The 13th annual ranking highlights the top hospitals in 10 pediatric specialties: cancer, cardiology and heart surgery, diabete s and endocrinology, gastroenterology and GI surgery, neonatology, nephrology, neurology and neurosurgery, orthopedics, pulmonology, and urology. St. Louis Children’s Hospital…
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - Category: American Health Authors: Source Type: news
Johns Hopkins Children's Center has been ranked as the best pediatric hospital in the state, and once again as one of the 10 best in the country, according to U.S. News&World Report. The annual Best Children’s Hospitals rankings are intended to help families of children with complex and rare conditions find the best medical care. The rankings highlight the top 50 hospital centers in 10 pediatric specialties: cancer, cardiology and heart surgery, diabetes and endocrinology, g astroenterology and…
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - Category: American Health Authors: Source Type: news
Geng-Hong Xia1†, Chao You1,2†, Xu-Xuan Gao1, Xiu-Li Zeng1, Jia-Jia Zhu1, Kai-Yu Xu3, Chu-Hong Tan1, Ruo-Ting Xu1, Qi-Heng Wu1, Hong-Wei Zhou3, Yan He4*‡ and Jia Yin1*‡ 1Department of Neurology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China 2Department of Neurology, The First People's Hospital of Zunyi, Zunyi, China 3State Key Laboratory of Organ Failure Research, Division of Laboratory Medicine, Zhujiang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China 4Microbiome Medicine Center, Division of Laboratory Medicine, Zhujiang Hospital, Southern Medical Univ...
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Young Americans are dying in rising numbers because of drugs, alcohol and suicide, according to new federal data. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) issued its annual comprehensive health and mortality report, which analyzes trends in death rates by cause and demographic. Drugs, alcohol and suicide, the report says, have contributed to the first drops in U.S. life expectancy since 1993. While U.S. life expectancy rose from 77.8 to 78.6 years between 2006 and 2016, the trend reversed during the end of the decade, leading to a 0.3-year decline between 2014 and ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Research Source Type: news
Young Americans are dying in rising numbers because of drugs, alcohol and suicide, according to new federal data. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) issued its annual comprehensive health and mortality report, which analyzes trends in death rates by cause and demographic. Drugs, alcohol and suicide, the report says, have contributed to the first drops in U.S. life expectancy since 1993. While U.S. life expectancy rose from 77.8 to 78.6 years between 2006 and 2016, the trend reversed during the end of the decade, leading to a 0.3-year decline between 2014 and ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Research Source Type: news
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
When it comes to your beverage of choice, alcoholic beverages are unique. For millions, they are a regular part of the dining experience. They’re often an important component of social events, celebrations, and milestones; we toast people, events, and memories with alcohol. They play a key role in many religious traditions. And, of course, the alcoholic beverage industry is a major economic force, responsible for more than $220 billion in sales annually in the US. And all of this is true despite the well-known and well-publicized risks of drinking too much alcohol. The negative effects of alcohol It should be a surpr...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Alcohol Health Source Type: blogs
I tell my patients to avoid drinking soda not just because they make you fat. Each sip of soda affects your health. Soda puts you at risk for health problems like metabolic syndrome. This is a collection of symptoms that can lead to diabetes, heart disease and other chronic diseases, like cancer. Soft drinks are the beverage of choice for millions of Americans. The latest research now reveals that sodas are a major cause of visceral fat — the deadliest kind of fat you can have, inflaming your tissues, rotting your blood vessels and upsetting your body chemistry. In a minute I’m going to tell you about a great ...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Tags: Heart Health heart disease metabolic syndrome Visceral Fat Source Type: news
You may have heard of Dry January, a campaign run in the U.K. by Alcohol Concern. To promote alcohol awareness, it involves (as you’ve likely gathered) completely abstaining from alcohol for the month of January. It’s a valuable campaign with noble intentions, but a minority of participants may unfortunately miss the wider point. A month of strict abstinence does lead some to drink more than they should come February 1. Remaining alcohol free for a month is an achievement which deserves to be rewarded, but compensatory drinking is not what Dry January is trying to advocate. A healthy attitude towards consu...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Addictions Alcoholism General Healthy Living Substance Abuse Abstinence Alcohol Abuse Alcoholic beverage Binge Drinking Drinking culture Liver disease Liver health Long-term effects of alcohol Moderation National Council on Alc Source Type: news
I was one of the first doctors to talk about the incredible benefits of the super-nutrient pyrroloquinoline quinone, or PQQ for short. I was also one of the first doctors to recommend it to patients. Now I recommend this essential nutrient and powerful antioxidant to almost everyone who comes to see me at my wellness clinic. Researchers have only just recently begun to understand the many important roles of PQQ on the body’s cellular processes. Not only does it possess extraordinary energy-giving qualities and have the power to ease nerve pain and battle Alzheimer’s, it has the potential to become the world&rsq...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Tags: Anti-Aging Cancer CoQ10 Source Type: news
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