Diabetes and differences in detection of incident invasive breast cancer

AbstractMany women diagnosed with breast cancer have chronic conditions such as diabetes that may impact other health behaviors. Our purpose was to determine if breast cancer screening and detection differs among women with and without diabetes. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of a retrospective cohort of women aged 52 –74 years diagnosed with incident stages I–III breast cancer enrolled in an integrated health plan between 1999 and 2014 with linkage to the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results registry (n = 2040). Screening data were taken from electronic health records. We used multivariable modified Poisson regression models with robust standard errors to estimate relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for outcomes of (i) receipt of screening in the 2 years prior to diagnosis; ( ii) symptom-detected breast cancer; and (iii) diagnosis of locally advanced stage III breast cancer. Compared to women without diabetes, women with diabetes were similar with respect to receipt of screening mammography (78% and 77%), symptom-detected breast cancer (46% and 49%), and stage III diagno sis (7% and 7%). In multivariable models adjusting for age and year of diagnosis, race, BMI, Charlson comorbidity score and depression diagnosis no differences were observed in the outcomes by presence of diabetes. Further investigation is warranted to determine how diabetes acts as a mediating fact or in adverse breast cancer outcomes.
Source: Cancer Causes and Control - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research

Related Links:

Among the many remarkable things that have happened since the COVID-19 pandemic began is that a lot of our usual medical care has simply stopped. According to a recent study, routine testing for cervical cancer, cholesterol, and blood sugar is down nearly 70% across the country. Elective surgeries, routine physical examinations, and other screening tests have been canceled or rescheduled so that people can stay at home, avoid being around others who might be sick, and avoid unknowingly spreading the virus. Many clinics, hospitals, and doctors’ offices have been closed for weeks except for emergencies. Even if these f...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Health care Healthy Aging Men's Health Women's Health Source Type: blogs
Rayfield Byrd knows when it’s time to wake up every morning. The 68-year-old Oakland, Cal., resident hears a voice from the living room offering a cheery good morning. Except Byrd lives alone. A little after 8 a.m. each day, a small yellow robot named Mabu asks Byrd how he’s doing. Byrd has Type 2 diabetes and congestive heart failure, and about three years ago, he had surgery to implant a microvalve in his heart to keep his blood flowing properly. To stay healthy, he takes four medications a day and needs to exercise regularly. To make sure his heart is still pumping effectively, his doctor needs to stay on to...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Artificial Intelligence Life Reinvented medicine Source Type: news
As artificial intelligence tools have been invading more or less every area of healthcare, we made a list to keep track of the top smart algorithms aiming for better diagnostics, more sophisticated patient care or further sighted predictions of diseases. Does A.I. beat doctors? Only if you lived under a rock for the last couple of years, could you not have heard about artificial intelligence. Some might have even come across the spread and potential of A.I. in healthcare. Not only smart algorithms themselves but also the hype around A.I. has grown immensely, thus every time a new study about deep learning or machine...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Artificial Intelligence in Medicine AI cancer death future Health Healthcare pathology prediction Radiology technology Source Type: blogs
By Susan Blumenthal, M.D. and Alexandrea Adams The recent commemoration of National Women’s Health Week provided an important time to mark the progress that has been made in advancing women’s health over the past two decades and to highlight what more needs to be done to achieve women’s health equity in America. Historically, women have experienced discrimination in health care despite making 80 percent of health care decisions for their families, using more medical services than men, and suffering greater disability from chronic disease. Before the mid 1990’s, women were often excluded as subjects ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
STUDY QUESTION Can the diagnosis of common diseases before menopause influence age at natural menopause (ANM) onset? SUMMARY ANSWER Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and depression were observed to delay menopause. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY It has been observed that women who undergo early menopause experience a higher burden of health problems related to metabolic syndromes, heart disease and depression, but whether ANM can be influenced by common adult diseases has not been studied extensively. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION All women attending mammography screening or clinical mammography at four hospitals in Sweden were in...
Source: Human Reproduction - Category: Reproduction Medicine Authors: Tags: Reproductive Epidemiology Source Type: research
My wife recently asked me, “Why do you assume you’ll die before me?” Her question caught me by surprise. But it’s true, I have made that assumption. So, I answered, as matter-of-factly as I could, with one word: statistics. I knew that, on average, women live longer than men. In fact, 57% of all those ages 65 and older are female. By age 85, 67% are women. The average lifespan is about 5 years longer for women than men in the U.S., and about 7 years longer worldwide. It’s not hard to see the gender gap among the elderly. A glance around most nursing homes or assisted living facilities in the U...
Source: New Harvard Health Information - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Men's Health Source Type: news
This article first appeared on the Golden Girls Network blog. Earlier on Huff/Post50: -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Historically, low- and middle-income countries have lower breast cancer rates than more economically developed countries. Yet, as these countries adopt a more Westernized lifestyle their populations face growing rates of heart disease, depression, diabetes, and cancer. The Rio Grande Valley of south Texas is home to a rapidly growing minority population. Since 2000, Cameron, Hidalgo, and Webb counties in South Texas have experienced population growth rates of 24.5%, 43.3%, and 35.9%, respectively1. Residents of these counties, located along the United States-Mexican border, are largely Hispanic (88.5% - 95.3%) and predomin...
Source: Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Genetic Testing and Counseling: Poster Presentations - Proffered Abstracts Source Type: research
Conclusion In the Information Age, to advance the care of patients, new technologies including wearables, remote monitoring, text messaging, apps, and social media are being added to the 'black bag' of tools carried by physicians and other health care providers including the blood pressure cuff, thermometer and stethoscope. This technology-shaped shift in health care, if implemented with innovation and evaluation, could potentially help reduce the rate of re-hospitalizations, allow for earlier diagnosis and intervention, promote prevention, reduce costs, and improve chronic disease management in communities across our coun...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Conclusion: The general breast cancer risk awareness among nurses in this pilot study is of concern. There is an unmet need to develop breast cancer preventive intervention program targeting at nurses. This pilot study helps to validate the proposed survey, and serves as the basis for our future design of appropriate intervention to enhance breast cancer awareness and improve early breast cancer prevention for female healthcare workers. Further study is warranted to be extend to female doctors, healthcare assistants and ward clerks etc. Citation Format: Janice Tsang, Siu Ting Yung, Alston Chiu, Henry Sze, Cindy Lai Shan Wo...
Source: Cancer Research - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Poster Session Abstracts Source Type: research
More News: Breast Cancer | Cancer | Cancer & Oncology | Depression | Diabetes | Electronic Health Records (EHR) | Endocrinology | Epidemiology | Mammography | Women