Factors associated with delay in undescended testis referral

Undescended testis (UDT) is one of the most common congenital disorders and is associated with infertility and testicular cancer. Multiple guidelines internationally have recommended orchiopexy by 18 months. Multiple large retrospective studies published in the last decade have found persistent delay in timing of orchiopexy.
Source: Journal of Pediatric Urology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Source Type: research

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AbstractBackgroundTesticular cancer (TC) is the most common cancer diagnosed in men of reproductive age group. Sperm banking is recommended in these patients prior to cancer treatment. There is no literature describing the proteins dysregulated in the spermatozoa of TC patients with poor motility.ObjectiveThe primary objective of this study was to compare the differences in the sperm proteome of normozoospermic (motility  >  40%) and asthenozoospermic (motility 
Source: Andrology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
Arcangelo Barbonetti, Alessio Martorella, Elisa Minaldi, Settimio D'Andrea, Dorian Bardhi, Chiara Castellini, Felice Francavilla, Sandro Francavilla
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Abstract SummaryCryptorchidism, characterized by the presence of one (unilateral) or both (bilateral) undescended testes, is a common male urogenital defect. Cryptorchidism can lead to male infertility, testicular cancer being the most extreme clinical symptom, as well as psychological issues of the inflicted individual. Despite this, both knowledge about the aetiology of cryptorchidism and the mechanism for cryptorchidism-induced male infertility remain limited. In this present study, by using an artificial cryptorchid mouse model, we investigated the effects of surgery-induced cryptorchidism on spermatogenic cel...
Source: Zygote - Category: Reproduction Medicine Authors: Tags: Zygote Source Type: research
AbstractBackgroundWhile the spermatotoxic properties of cancer treatments such as chemotherapy and radiation therapy are widely recognized, the effect of malignancy itself on male fertility is not clearly understood.ObjectivesTo determine whether malignancy is associated with diminished semen quality prior to spermatotoxic treatment among sperm bankers.Materials and MethodsRetrospective database review of de ‚Äźidentified records was obtained for all episodes of sperm banking performed at a cryobank from January 2004 to May 2017 for one of the following reasons: ‘future use’ (e.g., military deployment and gende...
Source: Andrology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
Abstract Over the past two decades, public health has focused on the identification of environmental chemical factors that are able to adversely affect hormonal function, known as endocrine disruptors (EDs). EDs mimic naturally occurring hormones like estrogens and androgens which can in turn interfere with the endocrine system. As a consequence, EDs affect human reproduction as well as post and pre-natal development. In fact, infants can be affected already at prenatal level due to maternal exposure to EDs. In particular, great attention has been given to those chemicals, or their metabolites, that have estrogeni...
Source: Reproductive Biology - Category: Reproduction Medicine Authors: Tags: Reprod Biol Endocrinol Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Recent work has identified associations between a number of malignancies and benign urologic conditions including male infertility, Peyronie's disease, cryptorchidism, and hypospadias. Molecular and genetic mechanisms have been proposed, but no definitive causal relationships have been identified to date. Future work will continue to better define the links between malignancy and benign urologic conditions and ultimately facilitate risk stratification, screening, and treatment of affected men. PMID: 30611645 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Urologic Oncology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: Urol Oncol Source Type: research
Publication date: 6 November 2018Source: Cell Reports, Volume 25, Issue 6Author(s): Brian P. Hermann, Keren Cheng, Anukriti Singh, Lorena Roa-De La Cruz, Kazadi N. Mutoji, I-Chung Chen, Heidi Gildersleeve, Jake D. Lehle, Max Mayo, Birgit Westernströer, Nathan C. Law, Melissa J. Oatley, Ellen K. Velte, Bryan A. Niedenberger, Danielle Fritze, Sherman Silber, Christopher B. Geyer, Jon M. Oatley, John R. McCarreySummarySpermatogenesis is a complex and dynamic cellular differentiation process critical to male reproduction and sustained by spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs). Although patterns of gene expression have been...
Source: Cell Reports - Category: Cytology Source Type: research
We report a case of a 10-month-old boy with an incarcerated inguinal hernia who was discovered to have transverse testicular ectopia following hernia reduction. The patient was treated with herniorrhaphy and open transseptal orchiopexy.
Source: Journal of Pediatric Surgery - Category: Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
AbstractChemotherapy-induced gonadal dysfunction resulting in transient or persistent infertility depends on the type of drugs and cumulative dose, and it is an important long-term complication, especially for adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer patients. Due to its importance, a clinical practice guideline for fertility preservation in childhood and AYA cancer patients was published by the Japan Society of Clinical Oncology (JSCO) in 2017. Although the precise mechanisms remain unclear, several studies reported that the cancer itself, not the cancer treatment, adversely affected semen quality. It is reported that that...
Source: International Journal of Clinical Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Discussion Cryptorchidism is the failure of one or both testes to descend from the abdomen into the scrotum. Congenital undescended testis (UDT)is common in young infants (1-4% in term infants and 45% in preterm infants) in that the testes will be palpable but remain high, but most testes will descend by 3-6 months and by 9 months of age only 1% remain undescended. The scrotum often appears underdeveloped. Sometimes the testes cannot be identified and is intra-abdominal at birth. Intra-abdominal testes are less likely to migrate to the scrotum and therefore are more likely to remain undescended. Acquired undescended test...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news
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