Greater Skills Equals Greater Ability to Combat Leprosy

Dr Ken Jetton (left) and Dr Arturo Cunanan (centre) with a patient who has been cured of leprosy in the Majuro leprosy clinic in the capital of the Marshall Islands. The patient is now seeking further help due to post-treatment complexities. Credit: Stella Paul/IPSBy Stella PaulMAJURO, Apr 4 2019 (IPS) It’s a Friday morning and Dr. Ken Jetton, the only doctor who treats leprosy in Majuro, the capital of the Marshall Islands, is seeing a patient recently cured of the disease. David, 32, has received multidrug therapy (MDT) treatment for a year already. But he is back in the doctor’s office because of a reversal reaction that has occurred. David, who asks to be referred to only by his first name to protect his privacy, has a stiffness in his fingers. A carpenter by profession, the stiffness is causing David greater financial loss than leprosy did as he cannot hold the tools of his trade in his hand any longer. “This is the kind of patient I typically attend to…people who have been cured of leprosy, but have physical disability due to reversal reaction to the treatment,” Jetton tells IPS. According to authors Francisco Vega-Lopez and Sara Ritchie in ‘Manson’s Tropical Infectious Diseases’, reversal reaction is one of two distinct reactions that occur after becoming infected by the bacterium that causes Hansen’s disease, also known as leprosy. “Reversal reactions may cause acute inflammation causing rapid loss of nerve ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Asia-Pacific Development & Aid Editors' Choice Featured Headlines Health Human Rights Regional Categories TerraViva United Nations Hansen's disease leprosy Marshall Islands Nippon Foundation Sasakawa Health Foundation Sasakawa Source Type: news

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This article reviews the NLFEP extensive efforts and interventions to eliminate LF in Yemen. LF mapping was started in 2000, followed by five annual rounds of mass drug administration (MDA) with ivermectin and albendazole in 8 implementation units (IUs) during 2002-2006. The epidemiological coverage for all MDA rounds was ≥80%. Based on WHO guidelines of 2005, MDA was stopped in 7 IUs, additional MDA rounds were continued in one IU until 2011. Microfilaremia monitoring and evaluation, and MDA stopping surveys were conducted based on WHO guidelines of 2005 and 2011. Information about the presence of patients suffering fr...
Source: Acta Tropica - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Acta Trop Source Type: research
by Anuj Tiwari, David J. Blok, Mohammad Arif, Jan Hendrik Richardus India has the highest burden of leprosy in the world. Following a recent WHO guideline, the Indian National Leprosy Programme is introducing post-exposure prophylaxis with single-dose rifampicin (SDR-PEP) in all high-endemic districts of the country. The aim of this study is to estimate the long-t erm cost-effectiveness of SDR-PEP in different leprosy disability burden situations. We used a stochastic individual-based model (SIMCOLEP) to simulate the leprosy new case detection rate trend and the impact of implementing contact screening and SDR-PEP from 20...
Source: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases - Category: Tropical Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
Abstract An observational pilot study was conducted to assess the nutritional status and morbidity profile of childhood contacts of leprosy in an endemic area (Chengalpattu) in India. A total of 70 such children were included in the study. Sociodemographic data were collected using a one-to-one interview method and the children were evaluated by dermatologists qualified in paediatric leprosy. The obtained data were computed. Three children were diagnosed to have leprosy through this study. Nutritional status assessment in these children demonstrated malnutrition, a common finding. Regular contact screening of chil...
Source: Tropical Doctor - Category: Tropical Medicine Authors: Tags: Trop Doct Source Type: research
Abstract This ecological study aims to analyze both the tendency and the characteristics of leprosy in the elderly population in the state of Bahia, 2001-2017. The tendency was analyzed through joinpoint regression. Epidemiological variables were also included in the study. The average detection rate was 38.73/100,000, with prevalence of men (45.19/100,000). A downward trend occurred in both genders, from 2004, with a greater magnitude in women (annual percent change [APC] = − 3.4%). Men presented higher proportions of the multibacillary forms and physical disabilities. The epidemiological scenario indicates the need...
Source: Anais Brasileiros de Dermatologia - Category: Dermatology Source Type: research
ConclusionA few scattered cases still can be seen in post-elimination era and some kind of leprosy control program is still necessary. Government commitments including adequate financial security and strong policy support are vital. Comprehensive case-finding measures including health promotion, personnel training, reward-offering, with an emphasis on former high or middle endemic areas, are necessary to improve early presentation of suspected cases and to increase suspicion and encourage participation of all relevant medical staff. Symptom surveillance based on a powerful transfer center may play an important role in the ...
Source: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases - Category: Tropical Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
by Mateo Prochazka, Joseph Timothy, Rachel Pullan, Karsor Kollie, Emerson Rogers, Abednego Wright, Jennifer Palmer BackgroundSkin neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) such as Buruli ulcer (BU) and leprosy produce significant stigma and disability. Shared clinical presentations and needs for care present opportunities for integrated case management in co-endemic areas. As global policies are translated into local integrated services, there remains a need to monitor what new configurations of care emerge and how individuals experience them. MethodsTo explore patient experiences of integrated case management for skin NTDs, in 2...
Source: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases - Category: Tropical Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
Mr Yohei Sasakawa, chairman of the Nippon Foundation and Sasakawa Health Foundation and WHO Goodwill ambassador. Credit : Crystal Orderson / IPSBy Rafiqul Islam and Crystal OrdersonDHAKA, Bangladesh, Dec 11 2019 (IPS) Leprosy is not a curse but should be detected and treated early, Bangladeshi Prime Minister, Sheikh Hasina, has told delegates at a gathering in her country’s capital to discuss the elimination of the disease. “In the past, it was thought that leprosy was a curse. But it was not a curse at all. The disease is caused by bacteria (Mycobacterium Leprae). We should fight it through research,” H...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Asia-Pacific Conferences Development & Aid Featured Headlines Health Human Rights Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Women's Health National Leprosy Conference - Dhaka 2019 Source Type: news
Semin Neurol 2019; 39: 462-471 DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-1687884Leprosy is a challenging international health concern. Despite tremendous efforts in reducing worldwide disease prevalence in the past decades, some countries remain endemic and are plagued by high levels of disability. The neurological complications of leprosy are varied and complex, with current research focused on evaluating tools for earlier diagnosis of neuropathy, especially in resource-limited countries. While treatment with multidrug therapy is highly effective, active research aims to simplify regimens to improve adherence, minimize adverse effects, and pre...
Source: Seminars in Neurology - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Review Article Source Type: research
ConclusionsThe resulting data demonstrate that leprosy amongst the elderly deserves attention because of the increased susceptibility to disability in this age group, with their higher risk of reaction and their greater level of co-morbidity.
Source: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases - Category: Tropical Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
ConclusionThe proposed model using RF allows for the diagnosis of leprosy with high sensitivity and specificity and the early identification of new cases among household contacts.
Source: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases - Category: Tropical Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
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