Peripheral transcriptomic biomarkers for early detection of sporadic Alzheimer disease?

Peripheral transcriptomic biomarkers for early detection of sporadic Alzheimer disease? Dialogues Clin Neurosci. 2018 Dec;20(4):293-300 Authors: Hadar A, Gurwitz D Abstract Alzheimer disease (AD) is the major epidemic of the 21st century, its prevalence rising along with improved human longevity. Early AD diagnosis is key to successful treatment, as currently available therapeutics only allow small benefits for diagnosed AD patients. By contrast, future therapeutics, including those already in preclinical or clinical trials, are expected to afford neuroprotection prior to widespread brain damage and dementia. Brain imaging technologies are developing as promising tools for early AD diagnostics, yet their high cost limits their utility for screening at-risk populations. Blood or plasma transcriptomics, proteomics, and/or metabolomics may pave the way for cost-effective AD risk screening in middle-aged individuals years ahead of cognitive decline. This notion is exemplified by data mining of blood transcriptomics from a published dataset. Consortia blood sample collection and analysis from large cohorts with mild cognitive impairment followed longitudinally for their cognitive state would allow the development of a reliable and inexpensive early AD screening tool. PMID: 30936769 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Dialogues in Clinical Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Tags: Dialogues Clin Neurosci Source Type: research

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I tried to kill my father for years. To be fair, I was following his wishes. He’d made it clear that when he no longer recognized me, when he could no longer talk, when the nurses started treating him like a toddler, he didn’t want to live any longer. My father was 58 years old when he was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. He took the diagnosis with the self-deprecating humor he’d spent a lifetime cultivating, constantly cracking jokes about how he would one day turn into a zombie, a walking corpse. We had a good 10 years with him after the diagnosis. Eventually, his jokes came true. Seven years ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Alzheimer's Disease Source Type: news
Alzheimer disease (AD) and related dementias are an emerging epidemic with an estimated 5.8 million individuals in the United States living with AD, a number expected to grow to 13.8 million by 2050.1 The financial impact is staggering with approximately $290 billion in healthcare, long-term care, and hospice costs along with an additional 18.5 billion hours of uncompensated caregiving costs per year that are valued at over $234 billion.2 Often neglected by an AD research community focused on finding an elusive cure, the behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD), such as agitation and depression, are associa...
Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Tags: Invited Perspective Source Type: research
Alzheimer's disease and related dementias are an emerging epidemic with an estimated 5.8 million individuals in the US living with Alzheimer's disease (AD), a number expected to grow to 13.8 million by 2050.1 The financial impact is staggering with approximately $290 billion in health care, long-term care, and hospice costs along with an additional 18.5 billion hours of uncompensated caregiving costs per year that are valued at over $234 billion.2 Often neglected by an AD research community focused on finding an elusive cure, the behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD), such as agitation and depression, ar...
Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Tags: Invited Perspective Source Type: research
Authors: Beeri MS Abstract With the aging of the population, Alzheimer disease (AD) has become an epidemic and a major public health threat. Hundreds of molecules tested in clinical trials in the last decade to treat AD have failed, moving the field to examine the clinical and neurobiological value of prevention of cognitive decline and AD. This short review describes recently finished or currently ongoing clinical trials for prevention of AD, both their main outcomes and secondary outcomes. In addition, the potential modifying effects of age and of genetics as important factors that may affect the design of future...
Source: Dialogues in Clinical Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Tags: Dialogues Clin Neurosci Source Type: research
(Natural News) Alzheimer’s disease is a global epidemic, especially among older adults. The irreversible and progressive disease – which causes dementia among older adults – affects over 5.5 million people in the U.S. alone. Not only is Alzheimer’s disease currently incurable; it is also one of the leading causes of death among Americans. Although the mechanisms behind the development and...
Source: NaturalNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Abstract Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease and main form of dementia, charac-terized by progressive cognitive decline and detrimental consequences in both personal-family and global level. Within this narrative review, we provide recent molecular aspects of Tau, a microtubule AD-associated protein as well as amyloid beta, involved in AD pathophysi-ology. Moreover, we provide additional emerging data from basic research as well as clinical studies indicating an implicating role of gastrointestinal microbiota (GIM), including Helicobac-ter pylori infection (Hp-I), in AD pathophysiology. Li...
Source: Current Molecular Medicine - Category: Molecular Biology Authors: Tags: Curr Mol Med Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Limited data of in vivo CTE biomarkers with postmortem confirmation are available. While some data exist, they are limited by selection bias. It is unlikely that a single test will be sufficient to properly diagnosis and distinguish CTE from other neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer disease or Frontotemporal Dementia. However, with a combination of fluid biomarkers, neuroimaging, and genetic testing, early detection may become possible. PMID: 31287716 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: The British Journal of Radiology - Category: Radiology Authors: Tags: Br J Radiol Source Type: research
Anyone who remembers the days before finger stick blood glucose meters became available to people with diabetes will recall how awful life was for diabetics. All they had was urine dipsticks which were sloppy, yielded only crude non-quantitative feedback on blood sugars, and gave you a gauge of what blood sugars were in the recent past, not the present. It meant that dosing insulin or diabetes drugs was grotesquely imprecise and accounted for many episodes of hypoglycemic coma and acceleration of diabetic complications. It was not uncommon in those days, for instance, for a type 1 diabetic to be blind and experience kidney...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: SIBO bowel flora Inflammation probiotic undoctored wheat belly Source Type: blogs
Right now the world is experiencing an epidemic that is projected to get much, much worse. It’s an epidemic of dementia, affecting 50 million people and millions more of their caregivers — staggering numbers that are projected to triple by 2050. The dementia crisis is such a massive worldwide issue that the World Health Organization (WHO) announced a strategic public health action plan, including compiling an organized database of quality dementia research and creating guidelines for the prevention of dementia. The guidelines have just been published, a 96-page document that is summarized here, as well as in th...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Alzheimer's Disease Brain and cognitive health Exercise and Fitness Healthy Aging Memory Nutrition Source Type: blogs
This study, as well as the larger SPRINT study, also demonstrated that overall intensive treatment of blood pressure in older adults is safe. However, we do know that some individuals may develop dizziness, imbalance, and in rare instances strokes with intensive blood pressure lowering. For that reason, it is important to discuss your blood pressure management with your primary care physician and follow his or her recommendation. How do cardiovascular risk factors affect brain health? We have evidence from studies of the population, studies of brain scans, and studies of animals, that treatment of cardiovascular risk facto...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Alzheimer's Disease Brain and cognitive health Heart Health Hypertension and Stroke Memory Prevention Source Type: blogs
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