3 ways to manage smartphone use and improve quality of life

_____ As psychologist Chris Willard often says, our phones can be our greatest enemy or greatest friend. While they can save us time and energy, educate and entertain us, and keep us safe in emergencies, they can also distract us from the things we need in life to stay happy and healthy. And that distraction is often more than a casual annoyance. That’s because everything from our newsfeeds to our cell phone’s notification style follows proven algorithms that aim to keep us attached. As with slot machines, our phones train us to crave the next exciting, momentary distraction, and get sucked into checking every moment we are bored. Quite literally, phones are designed to fix our attention on the screen, not to promote healthy behavior. Healthy living today requires defining the time and place for technology. It’s an exercise in self-awareness, because while we have the tools and knowledge to live well, we often get caught up in reactivity and habit. Living with intention, we can pause, observe with clarity the impact of technology, and make intentional choices that guide us towards better health and more happiness. Here are some ways to manage the problematic side of cell phones and use them to promote the exact health behaviors they often undermine. 1. Protect Sleep and Exercise Our bodies require sleep and exercise to function effectively, but our phone use may be detracting from both. Phones disrupt sleep, not only because of their light that stimulates ou...
Source: SharpBrains - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Education & Lifelong Learning Health & Wellness attention exercise healthy-living quality-of-life relationships sleep smartphones Source Type: blogs

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Abstract The goals of the health maintenance visit in school-aged children (five to 12 years) are promoting health, detecting disease, and counseling to prevent injury and future health problems. During the visit, the physician should address patient and parent/caregiver concerns and ask about emergency department or hospital care since the last visit; lifestyle habits (diet, physical activity, daily screen time, secondhand smoke exposure, hours of sleep per night, dental care, safety habits); and school performance. Poor school performance may indicate problems such as learning disabilities, attention-deficit/hyp...
Source: American Family Physician - Category: Primary Care Authors: Tags: Am Fam Physician Source Type: research
In a world of social companion robots, chatbots, or artificial intelligence buddies, adults have the responsibility to teach kids well how to live a healthy life with the available technologies, how to balance between the online and the offline world, how to keep their mental stability in the face of innovations. As it’s an awfully difficult job, we collected examples where digital health technology could help and in which areas should analog methods prevail. The land where kindergarteners play with the texture of raspberry When was the last time you paid attention to the crunching sounds while eating a raw ca...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Future of Medicine Health Sensors & Trackers apps children cognitive health digital health digital literacy eating fitness health apps health literacy healthy eating healthy lifestyle Innovation kids mental health physical Source Type: blogs
We reported DEGs with a nominal p-value of 0.8. The network construction was created using blockwiseModules function for consideration of computer efficiency. The module detection criteria were as follows: minimum module size of 50, deepsplit of 4, and merge threshold of 0.25. The merged modules were then summarized with module eigengene (ME) correlations>0.75. MEs were defined by their first principal component and were labeled with different colors as module names in the Results section. After the modules were generated, we conducted different enrichment analysis to explore the functional interpretation of genes withi...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Conclusion: Fun seeking on the BAS and frustration intolerance should be considered as targets in prevention and intervention programs for IA among adolescents with ADHD.IntroductionThe negative effects of internet addiction (IA) have become a concern in the past decades. IA is characterized by persistent internet use despite negative consequences, loss of control, preoccupation with internet use, increasing amounts of time spent online, and withdrawal symptoms (1). Internet gaming disorders are listed in the “Conditions for Further Study” section in the Fifth Edition of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Men...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
I’m a little dumb-founded whenever I run across a prescribing trend that goes against all of the available empirical evidence for common sense use of a medication. Nowhere is this more evident than with the prescription of atypical antipsychotic medications. It wouldn’t be too far a stretch to suggest that such prescriptions have become like Prozac prescriptions in the 1990s, the latest medication fad. But atypical antipsychotics, like Seroquel (quetiapine fumarate), are far more complex with far more problematic side effects than drugs like Prozac, and should only be prescribed for on-label use. The Washingto...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Antipsychotic General Medications Policy and Advocacy Adverse Effects Atypical Antipsychotic Bipolar Disorder Insomnia movement disorder Seroquel side effects Weight Gain Source Type: blogs
Follow me on Twitter @RobShmerling Ever wonder what other people are wondering about? I know I do. So, here are the top 10 health searches in Google for 2017. And just so you don’t have to look each one up, I’ve provided a brief answer. You’re welcome. 1.  What causes hiccups? I was surprised this one made it to the top 10 list of health searches. Maybe this search is common because hiccups are as mysterious as they are universal. I’ve written about hiccups before, but let’s just say the cause in any individual person is rarely known or knowable. Then again, the reason hiccups stop is als...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Source Type: blogs
Conclusions: Nature contact may offer a range of human health benefits. Although much evidence is already available, much remains unknown. A robust research effort, guided by a focus on key unanswered questions, has the potential to yield high-impact, consequential public health insights. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP1663 Received: 26 January 2017 Revised: 12 May 2017 Accepted: 25 May 2017 Published: 31 July 2017 Address correspondence to H. Frumkin, Dept. of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, University of Washington School of Public Health, Box 354695, Seattle, WA 98195-4695 USA; Telephone: 206-897-1723;...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Commentary Source Type: research
Table of Contents A1 Pirfenidone inhibits TGF-b1-induced extracellular matrix production in nasal polyp-derived fibroblasts Jae-Min Shin, Heung-Man Lee, Il-Ho Park A2 The efficacy of a 2-week course of oral steroid in the treatment of chronic spontaneous urticaria refractory to antihistamines Hyun-Sun Yoon, Gyeong Yul Park A3 The altered distribution of follicular t helper cells may predict a more pronounced clinical course of primary sjögren’s syndrome Margit Zeher A4 Betamethasone suppresses Th2 cell development induced by langerhans cell li...
Source: World Allergy Organization Journal - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Nate Seltenrich covers science and the environment from Petaluma, CA. His work has appeared in High Country News, Sierra, Yale Environment 360, Earth Island Journal, and other regional and national publications. Background image: ©ooyo/iStockphoto About This Article open Citation: Seltenrich N. 2015. Just what the doctor ordered: using parks to improve children’s health. Environ Health Perspect 123:A254–A259; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.123-A254 News Topics: Children’s Health, Climate Change, Green Spaces, Mental Health, Neurologic Health, Noise Pollution, Obesity, Recreation Publi...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Featured Focus News Children's Health Climate Change Green Spaces Mental Health Neurologic Health Noise Pollution Obesity October 2015 Recreation Source Type: research
Introduction The muscular dystrophies (MD) are a group of genetically heterogeneous muscle diseases marked by progressive wasting and weakness of the skeletal and cardiac muscles1. Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common and most severe form. It is an X-linked disorder affecting 1 in 5000 live male births2,3. DMD is caused by mutations in the DMD gene, which encodes the muscle fiber membrane protein dystrophin. Deficiency or complete absence of dystrophin makes muscle fibers sensitive to damage upon contraction, leading to plasma membrane leakage and muscle fiber degeneration, which eventually leads to progres...
Source: PLOS Currents Muscular Dystrophy - Category: Neurology Authors: Source Type: research
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