Postpartum xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis: A case report

We present a case of XGP without any evidence of renal calculi, manifesting in a 26-year-old previously healthy woman immediately post-partum.
Source: Case Reports in Womens Health - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research

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An infection involving the kidney is known as acute pyelonephritis. This usually starts as a urinary tract infection that moves to the kidney. Acute pyelonephritis is commonly treated with antibiotics. Imaging studies are not usually required but may be needed if an individual has a history of diabetes or prior history of kidney stones, is immunocompromised, or is not responding to treatment.
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - Category: Radiology Authors: Tags: Appropriate use criteria Source Type: research
An infection involving the kidney is known as acute pyelonephritis. This usually starts as a urinary tract infection that moves to the kidney. Acute pyelonephritis is commonly treated with antibiotics. Imaging studies are not usually required but may be needed if an individual has a history of diabetes or prior history of kidney stones, is immunocompromised, or is not responding to treatment.
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - Category: Radiology Authors: Tags: Appropriate use criteria Source Type: research
Xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis is a rare form of chronic pyelonephritis in which the involved areas of the kidneys are destroyed and replaced by foam cells. It usually occurs in immunocompromised middle-aged females with ureteral obstruction or chronic urinary tract infection induced by the formation of renal stones. We herein report the case of a 44-year-old woman, with a history of left kidney staghorn calculi and recurrent urinary tract infections. Abdominal computed tomography showed the'bear paw'sign, typical appearance of XGP and patient underwent a nephrectomy with uneventful post-operative course.
Source: Journal of Radiology Case Reports - Category: Radiology Source Type: research
ConclusionsOur case illustrates an uncommon but clinically important do-not-miss diagnosis that underlies a common clinical presentation of pleuritic chest pain. The case underscores the importance of maintaining a broad differential diagnosis and organized approach when treating patients with undifferentiated clinical presentations.
Source: Journal of Medical Case Reports - Category: Journals (General) Source Type: research
We report a 44-year-old nonimmunocompromised Japanese man with bacteremic pyelonephritis caused by a nontypable H. influenzae associated with a left ureteral calculus. The organism was isolated from both blood and urine cultures. Treatment consisted of 14days of intravenous ceftriaxone and oral amoxicillin one after than other and insertion of a left ureteral stent. After discharge, he underwent extracorporeal shock wave lithotrity for the left ureteral calculus. He had no recrudescence of the symptoms. H. influenzae should be considered as a genitourinary pathogen among patients with certain risk factors such as anatomica...
Source: IDCases - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
Conclusions: CD is a chronic, granulomatous bowel disease, with urolithiasis as the most common extraintestinal manifestation (EIM), particularly frequent in patients submitted to bowel surgery. This complication needs to be recognized and addressed appropriately, especially in patients with unexplained renal dysfunction, abdominal pain, or recurrent urinary tract infection. We believe this study to be an updated valuable review as most data related to this kind of EIM refers to articles published before 2000, most of them before 1990. These patients need to be followed up with a specific prevention plan to eliminate or mi...
Source: Urology Annals - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Source Type: research
Conclusions: CD is a chronic, granulomatous bowel disease, with urolithiasis as the most common extraintestinal manifestation (EIM), particularly frequent in patients submitted to bowel surgery. This complication needs to be recognized and addressed appropriately, especially in patients with unexplained renal dysfunction, abdominal pain, or recurrent urinary tract infection. We believe this study to be an updated valuable review as most data related to this kind of EIM refers to articles published before 2000, most of them before 1990. These patients need to be followed up with a specific prevention plan to eliminate or mi...
Source: Urology Annals - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Source Type: research
Singh et al raise some important points for clarification. First, the patients in this study had asymptomatic renal calculi detected as part of the evaluation for recurrent lower urinary tract infections. These were not patients with a history of pyelonephritis, which, as Singh et al correctly indicate, would be a different population worthy of further study. In addition, the men in this study with obstructive urinary symptoms underwent a trial of alpha-blockers, and, when indicated, evaluation with noninvasive urodynamics (uroflowmetry, post-void residual) and/or cystoscopy (if a stricture was suspected).
Source: The Journal of Urology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Tags: Letter to the Editor/Errata Source Type: research
Abstract: This is a case report of a 48-year-old woman with a medical history of recurrent urinary tract infections (mainly with Proteus mirabilis) and staghorn renal stones formation who had left nephrectomy for a nonfunctioning left kidney. The kidney had a mass detected radiologically and confirmed by gross examination, centered on a staghorn renal stone within one of the major calyces. Histology of the lesion revealed inflammatory infiltrates that consisted of large lipid-laden macrophages with foamy cytoplasm, scattered multinucleated giant cells, neutrophils, lymphocytes, and plasma cells in a background of extensive...
Source: Pathology Case Reviews - Category: Pathology Tags: Case Reviews Source Type: research
A 4-year-old Caucasian female presented with abdominal pain, emesis, and fever. She had been having recurrent urinary tract infections over the past year prior to admission. She has had multiple urine cultures positive for Escherichia coli. Three days prior to admission, a renal ultrasound was performed and multiple renal stones were detected. A computed tomography of the abdomen and pelvis was performed on admission and showed multiple renal calculi with the largest measuring 11 × 13 mm. In addition there was gas noted within the right renal collecting system (Figures 1 and 2; Figure 2 avail...
Source: The Journal of Pediatrics - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Insights and Images Source Type: research
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