PERSPECTIVES Lifestyle and Environmental Factors in Multiple Sclerosis

Lifestyle and environmental factors potently influence the risk of multiple sclerosis (MS), because genetic predisposition only explains a fraction of the risk increase. There is strong evidence for associations of Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) infection, smoking, sun exposure/vitamin D, and adolescent obesity to risk of MS. There is also circumstantial evidence on organic solvents and shift work, all associate with greater risk, although certain factors like nicotine, alcohol, and a high coffee consumption associate with a reduced risk. Certain factors, smoking, EBV infection, and obesity interact with human leukocyte antigen (HLA) risk genes, arguing for a pathogenic pathway involving adaptive immunity. There is a potential for prevention, in particular for people at greater risk such as relatives of individuals with MS. All of the described factors for MS may influence adaptive and/or innate immunity, as has been argued for MS risk gene variants.
Source: Cold Spring Harbor perspectives in medicine - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Multiple Sclerosis PERSPECTIVES Source Type: research

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Authors: Razzak HA, Harbi A, Ahli S Abstract A Depression is a prevalent mental healthcare problem and a common cause of disability worldwide. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence and risk factors of depression in individuals living in the UAE. We used a systematic review approach, searching PubMed and Scopus electronic databases to collect studies conducted between 2007 and 2017 on the UAE population (both citizens and expatriates) relating to depression. After evaluating and screening relevant articles, a review of 14 articles was conducted. The prevalence of depression and study populations ...
Source: Oman Medical Journal - Category: Middle East Health Tags: Oman Med J Source Type: research
This study shows that mRNA levels of the aging related lamin A splice variant progerin, associated with premature aging in HGPS, were significantly upregulated in subjects with BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2. Moreover, our data revealed a significantly positive correlation of BMI with progerin mRNA. These data provide to our knowledge for the first-time evidence for a possible involvement of progerin in previously observed accelerated aging of overweight and obese individuals potentially limiting their longevity. Our results also showed that progerin mRNA was positively correlated with C-reactive protein (CRP). This might suggest an as...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Conclusion The expression of the components of the PTN-MK-RPTPβ/ζ axis in immune cells and in inflammatory diseases suggests important roles for this axis in inflammation. Pleiotrophin has been recently identified as a limiting factor of metainflammation, a chronic pathological state that contributes to neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration. Pleiotrophin also seems to potentiate acute neuroinflammation independently of the inflammatory stimulus while MK seems to play different -even opposite- roles in acute neuroinflammation depending on the stimulus. Which are the functions of MK and PTN in chronic neuroinfla...
Source: Frontiers in Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
It’s hardly news that the gastrointestinal tract is important to human health: It transports food from the mouth to the stomach, converts it into absorbable nutrients and stored energy, and shuttles waste back out of the body. If you don’t properly nourish yourself, you don’t live. It’s that simple. But in recent years, scientists have discovered that the GI system has an even bigger, more complex job than previously appreciated. It’s been linked to numerous aspects of health that have seemingly nothing to do with digestion, from immunity to emotional stress to chronic illnesses, including can...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Research Source Type: news
CBS Local — There’s been plenty of progress in the medical world this year, and as a result we now know that more Americans than ever have high blood pressure, but also that coffee everyday is actually good for you. Here’s a look back at the year in health. Opioid Crisis The opioid crisis has dominated much of the health news cycle. President Trump declared the opioid crisis a national emergency earlier this year. Drug overdoses are now the leading cause of death for people under 50 in the United States. New Guidelines for High Blood Pressure The American Heart Association revised its guidelines for high ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News best of 2017 Samantha Lazarus Bennet Source Type: news
Before the medical community had better understanding of the mechanisms that cause disease, doctors believed certain ailments could originate from imbalances in the stomach. This was called hypochondriasis. (In Ancient Greek, hypochondrium refers to the upper part of the abdomen, the region between the breastbone and the navel.) This concept was rejected as science evolved and, for example, we could look under a microscope and see bacteria, parasites, and viruses. The meaning of the term changed, and for many years doctors used the word “hypochondriac” to describe a person who has a persistent, often inexplicab...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Digestive Disorders Health Source Type: blogs
The rate at which disability progresses in multiple sclerosis (MS), and its severity, have been associated with modifiable lifestyle habits.
Source: Archives of Medical Research - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
If you want to know the state of your health, try looking down. “There’s no question it’s extremely important that people pay attention to their feet,” says Terry Philbin, D.O., spokesperson for the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons (AAOS) and a foot and ankle specialist at the Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Center in Westerville, Ohio. The condition of your feet can give you clues to a host of medical issues, such as diabetes, arthritis, and even heart disease. Read on to find out what to look for and what it may mean. 1. Pain “There’s no pain that should be ignored,” says Jane ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Discussion Humans are only one species among the multitudes that inhabit the earth. While many species are used by humans for food, clothing or shelter, as a higher evolved organism, humans are particularly aware of other species that move as they could be a potential predator or cause injury. This wariness is protective, but moving animal species can be domesticated (e.g. dogs, horses), farmed (e.g. cattle, goats) or harvested (e.g. fish, silk) for human use for food, clothing or shelter and also for medicinal use. Learning Point Medical leeches have been used since ancient times. The most commonly used leech is Hirudo me...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news
There's never a shortage of health-related headlines. I don't envy the editors of The Week magazine, who have to sift through countless inane weight-loss stories as well as seemingly important new research to determine just the right fit for the magazine's "Health Scare of the Week" column. Like those editors, the public has the arduous responsibility of judiciously deciding what news stories to toss aside and what stories to accept as important. Last week's story said red wine will protect your heart, this week it's toxic, and next week your choice of wine or beer make determine whether you are alive or dead by...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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