Perioperative Invasive Vascular Catheterization Associated With Increased Risk of Postoperative Infection in Lumbar Spine Surgery: An Analysis of 114,259 Patient Records

Conclusions: Perioperative invasive vascular catheterization was significantly associated with an increased the risk of postoperative infections in lumbar spine surgery, independent of a patient’s concomitant comorbidities. Therefore, in patients with an indication for invasive catheterization, surgeons should consider risks and benefits of surgery carefully. Level of Evidence: Level III.
Source: Journal of Spinal Disorders and Techniques - Category: Surgery Tags: PRIMARY RESEARCH Source Type: research

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Authors: Ha JK, Hwang CJ, Lee DH, Lee MY, Yoon SJ, Lee CS Abstract The purpose of this study was to compare various sagittal spinopelvic parameters between patients with and without degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis (DLS). A total of 165 patients who underwent surgery for low back and/or radicular pain were divided into two groups: those without DLS (non-DLS group; n = 85) and those with DLS (DLS group; n = 80). In all sagittal spinopelvic parameters, no significant difference was found between the non-DLS and DLS groups. The mean pelvic incidence (PI) value of the DLS group (56.4°) was almost similar to th...
Source: Acta Orthopaedica Belgica - Category: Orthopaedics Tags: Acta Orthop Belg Source Type: research
We present the 10 years results of 33 patients operated on between April 2002 and May 2006 diagnosed with a "sports hernia". The injury was treated with a bilateral abdominal procedure according to Nesovic combined with a bilateral adductor release after unsuccessful conservative treatment of at least 2 months. There were 32 male patients between 18 and 43 years and one female patient aged 25 years with a mean age of 28.8 at time of surgery. All procedures were bilateral. Patients were seen in the postoperative clinic and a questionnaire was collected after 2 years and 10 years. Within 16 weeks, 30 patients (90,9...
Source: Acta Orthopaedica Belgica - Category: Orthopaedics Tags: Acta Orthop Belg Source Type: research
Authors: Persiani P, Dario Gurzi M, Formica A, Ruggeri A, Villani C Abstract A Lisfranc injury is when one or more of the metatarsals are displaced from the tarsus. The term is more commonly used to describe an injury to the midfoot, centred on the 2nd tarso-metatarsal joint. These fractures are sometimes easily overlooked, especially if they are part of a polytrauma. They are often difficult to diagnose and treat, but if they go undetected and are not properly treated, they can cause long-term or chronic disability. Our team reviewed a group of 71 patients with a Lisfranc fracture dislocation. The lesions were cla...
Source: Acta Orthopaedica Belgica - Category: Orthopaedics Tags: Acta Orthop Belg Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONSThis series of the first 100 patients to undergo awake endoscopic MIS-TLIF demonstrates outcomes comparable to those reported in our earlier papers. This procedure can provide a safe and efficacious option for lumbar fusion with less morbidity than open surgery. Further refinements in surgical technique and technologies will allow for improved success. PMID: 30933915 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Neurosurgical Focus - Category: Neurosurgery Authors: Tags: Neurosurg Focus Source Type: research
ConclusionPotential sequela of osteomyelitis is ankylosis of affected joints. In this particular case, imaging provides evidence of regional ankylosis of the cervical spine. Considering the patient did not complain of cervical pain or related symptoms apart from lack of cervical range of motion, and his Neck Disability Index score was 2 out of 50 (4%), no intervention was provided to the cervical spine. The patient reported he self-managed well, worked full-time as a postal worker after he was discharged due to the injury to his neck, and planned to retire in less than one month at age 70. The patient demonstrates successf...
Source: Chiropractic and Manual Therapies - Category: Complementary Medicine Source Type: research
About 85% of the patients with low back pain seeking medical care have nonspecific low back pain (NsLBP), implying that no definitive cause can be identified. NsLBP is defined as LBP and disability which cannot be linked to a underlying pathology, such as cancer, spinal osteomyelitis, fracture, spinal stenosis, cauda equine, ankylosing spondylitis and visceral-referred pain. Many pain conditions are linked with elevated serum levels of pro-inflammatory biomarkers. Outcomes of interest are NsLBP and the level of pro-inflammatory biomarkers.
Source: The Spine Journal - Category: Orthopaedics Authors: Tags: Review Article Source Type: research
​What do you do for a nail from a nail gun in the hand? This procedure is simple, but you have to worry about the aftermath. Complicated issues may arise post-procedure in the days to weeks after extraction, including retained foreign bodies, infection, fractures, disability, pain, nerve damage, tendon rupture, and cosmetic concerns.​Removing the nail is only half the battle. Proper removal, treatment, and follow-up should be considered with all foreign bodies in the skin, especially the hand. Being prepared for the possible aftershocks will help your patient have a successful recovery.A 23-year-old man with a nail fro...
Source: The Procedural Pause - Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs
Authors: Issa K, Pourtaheri S, Vijapura A, Stewart T, Sinha K, Hwang K, Emami A Abstract INTRODUCTION: Obtaining blood or tissue cultures prior to administration of antibiotics has been the standard of care in the treatment of osteomyelitis of the spine. A delay in diagnosis of vertebral osteomyelitis is the primary culprit for the inaccuracy of blood cultures and biopsies. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of spinal osteomyelitis in patients where the infecting organism was identified through cultures in contrast to cases where the cultures continued to be negative. MATERIALS AND METHODS: ...
Source: Surgical Technology International - Category: Surgery Tags: Surg Technol Int Source Type: research
​BY MARK ​GRANT, DOA 31-year-old man presented to the emergency department with dyspnea, fever, cough, and weakness for two weeks. He had recently seen his internist, and was diagnosed with a viral infection. He was seen again at an urgent care center a few days before his ED presentation, and was diagnosed with bronchitis and an ear infection and placed on an antibiotic.The patient said in the ED that he was not improving, and was now experiencing back pain, shortness of breath, and occasional fevers and sweats. The patient stated he had sharp chest pain at times and was coughing up clear sputum more often over t...
Source: The Case Files - Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: research
Authors: Issa K, Pourtaheri S, Vijapura A, Stewart T, Sinha K, Hwang K, Emami A Abstract INTRODUCTION: Obtaining blood or tissue cultures prior to administration of antibiotics has been the standard of care in the treatment of osteomyelitis of the spine. A delay in diagnosis of vertebral osteomyelitis is the primary culprit for the inaccuracy of blood cultures and biopsies. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of spinal osteomyelitis in patients where the infecting organism was identified through cultures in contrast to cases where the cultures continued to be negative. MATERIALS AND METHODS: ...
Source: Surgical Technology International - Category: Surgery Tags: Surg Technol Int Source Type: research
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