David Attenborough Isn ’t Sure We Can Save the Natural World. But at 92, He’s Not Giving Up Trying

It’s the voice you notice first. In person, David Attenborough speaks in the same awestruck hush he has used in dozens of nature documentaries, a crisp half whisper that is often mimicked but seldom matched. Ninety-two years of use may have softened its edges, but still it carries the command of authority. Sitting in his home in the Richmond neighborhood of west London for one in a series of conversations, I feel compelled to drink a second cup of tea when he offers. It somehow seems wrong to say no. In his native U.K., Attenborough is held in the kind of esteem usually reserved for royalty. Over decades–first as a television executive, then as a wildlife filmmaker and recently as a kind of elder statesman for the planet–he has achieved near beatific status. He was knighted by the Queen in 1985 and is usually referred to as Sir David. As he walked into the Royal Botanic Gardens for TIME’s portrait shoot on the day of our interview, the mere sight of him caused members of the public and staff alike to break into goofy smiles. Attenborough pioneered a style of wildlife filmmaking that brought viewers to remote landscapes and gave them an intimate perspective on the wonders of nature. Frans de Waal, the renowned Dutch primatologist, says he regularly uses clips from Attenborough’s shows in lectures. “He has shaped the views of millions of people about nature,” he says. “Always respectful, always knowledgeable, he takes us by the h...
Source: TIME: Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Environment Source Type: news

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​Outdoor recreation has exploded since we all began social distancing for COVID-19, and EDs are seeing more camping and home improvement injuries from table saws, crafting projects, and even canning (burns). Boating and motorcycle accidents also seem to be on the rise. Many fisherfolk will be on and in the water using hooks, barbs, lines, and wires. Many of these anglers will arrive with a hook in the arm, hand, or scalp, unable to remove the hook themselves. In fact, their own attempts to remove the hooks may make matters worse. Fish hook injuries may seem simple at first, but can quickly get complicated, depending on t...
Source: The Procedural Pause - Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs
Russian President Vladimir Putin eased the nationwide lockdown imposed on March 30 to stem the spread of the coronavirus, even as Russia becomes Europe’s new hotspot for the infection. With more than 250,000 cases as of May 15, Russia now has the second-highest number of confirmed COVID-19 cases in the world. In a televised address to the nation on May 11, Putin said that some sectors would return to work from the following day, though restrictions on large public events across the country would stay in place. Everyone is required to wear face masks and gloves in shops and on public transport. Still closed in Moscow ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Explainer feature Londontime Source Type: news
Conditions:   Myopia;   Hypermetropia;   Refractive Errors;   Astigmatism Intervention:   Drug: Proparacaine Ophthalmic Sponsor:   Beeran Meghpara, MD Not yet recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
What exactly is psychosis? What happens in the brain of a person with schizophrenia who is hallucinating? Schizophrenic Rachel Star Withers shares her personal hallucinations and delusions and Dr. Joseph Goldberg, who specializes in researching what goes on in the brain when someone is experiencing psychosis, joins to break down how the brain functions during psychotic episodes. Host Rachel Star Withers, a diagnosed schizophrenic, and co-host Gabe Howard delve into these intense subjects in this episode of Inside Schizophrenia.  Highlights from “Psychosis in Schizophrenia” Episode [02:13]  Rachel, do...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Brain and Behavior Disorders General Inside Schizophrenia Mental Health and Wellness Active psychosis Delusions Delusions Hallucinations Living with Schizoprenia Mental Disorder Mental Illness Psychology psychotic Psychotic Break Source Type: blogs
Twenty years ago this fall, the Institute of Medicine—an U.S.-based independent, nongovernmental organization widely regarded as an authority at the intersection of medicine and society—released a report titled “To Err Is Human.” It announced that up to 98,000 Americans were dying each year from medical errors. Official and popular reaction was swift. Congress mandated the monitoring of progress in efforts to prevent patient harm, and the health care industry set grand goals, such as reducing medical errors by 50% within five years. News outlets reported on the proceedings closely. A remedy for a lo...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Healthcare public health Source Type: news
Jeffrey A. SingerThe Drug Enforcement Administration, having virtually eliminated the diversion of prescription pain relievers into the underground market for nonmedical users, appears to be setting its sights on regulating the medical management of pain, a mission not suited for law enforcement. Acting under the authority of the Substance Use-Disorder Prevention that Promotes Opioid Recovery and Treatment for Patients and Communities Act (SUPPORT Act), the DEA  announced a proposal to reduce, once again, the national production quotas for fentanyl, morphine, hydromorphone (Dilaudid), oxycodone, and oxymorphone, ...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - Category: American Health Authors: Source Type: blogs
Alessia Buso1†, Marina Comelli1†, Raffaella Picco1, Miriam Isola1, Benedetta Magnesa1, Rado Pišot2, Joern Rittweger3,4, Desy Salvadego1, Boštjan Šimunič2, Bruno Grassi1,5 and Irene Mavelli1,6* 1Department of Medicine, University of Udine, Udine, Italy 2Institute for Kinesiology Research, Science and Research Centre, Koper, Slovenia 3Department of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany 4Institute of Aerospace Medicine, German Aerospace Center (DLR), Cologne, Germany 5Institute of Bioimaging and Molecular Physiology, National Research Council...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
A newly discovered genetic mutation caused a Scottish woman to endure cuts, burns, broken bones, childbirth and surgery without feeling any pain, according to a case study published in the British Journal of Anaesthesia. About five years ago, Joanne Cameron, now 71, had what should have been a painful hand surgery at Scotland’s Raigmore Hospital, says Dr. Devjit Srivastava, a consultant in anesthesia and pain medicine at the hospital. “She mentioned that she does not feel pain and she did not need any anesthesia, which was not a usual day in the office for me,” Srivastava tells TIME. “I disregarded ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized medicine onetime Source Type: news
Here ’s a fun fact that I just recently learned. When they (the people who make up such things, almost certainly with a clipboard in hand) determine survival rates for people who survive procedures such as open heart surgery, they don’t just count those who made it off the table and back to their roo ms. For some major categories, they actually measure the rate of survival for thirty days, beginning with the surgery and ending with the cake decorated with“ONE MONTH DEATH-FREE, WOO!” in heart-healthy icing on top.So this is perhaps a bit premature. Watch for a posthumous“edited to add: Oops, ne...
Source: Schuyler's Monster: The Blog - Category: Disability Authors: Source Type: blogs
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