Features of Catatonia in a 12-Year-Old Boy with Autism Spectrum Disorder

CASE: Thomas is a 12-year-old boy with autism spectrum disorder who presents to his primary care clinician with symptoms of worsening mood in the last 3 months. On review of his last school testing, his cognitive abilities are found to be within the average range, with a relative vulnerability with his processing speed. He can speak in sentences to communicate and answer questions, but he rarely picks up on conversational bids. He has had difficulties developing friendships and often prefers to play by himself. Thomas has a long history of some features of anxiety and depression for which it was recommended that he establish care with a therapist, but his family has had a hard time finding a provider for him. At this visit, the mother reports that for the past several months he has been more anxious, sad, and easily overwhelmed. He seems irritable at home and school and cries often. His family has been advocating for him to receive increased school supports, as school is a source of anxiety for him, but there are no recent changes in school services. There is a family history of both anxiety and depression. Given his worsening mood functioning, Thomas was started on selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) medication in addition to again recommending a therapist. Weekly phone call check-ins and an in-person clinic visit in 1 month are planned. About 1 month after starting the SSRI medication, he is still not showing any improvement in mood functioning, and his family...
Source: Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics - Category: Child Development Tags: Challenging Case Source Type: research

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ConclusionsSocial interactions are the most complex and ambiguous environments human beings place themselves in. Many explicit and implicit “rules” govern what is considered appropriate and what can be expected from any one interaction. Consequently, they are settings rife for miscommunication and misunderstanding. It requires intricate examination to determine exactly what the rewarding components of social interactions are. Social interactions are highly dynamic, complex circumstances that seem more inclined to produce anxiety than lead to rewards given their ambiguities. For those with social anhedonia, whos...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
This study examines the effect of employment on delinquent behavior among young people in “hidden situations”. Both quantitative and qualitative methods were used, and 588 young people in these hidden situations were investigated. Results showed that some of them had employment; their employment status constituted a mediating effect on preventing them from being involved in delinquent behavior. Also, participants who had work explained the reasons for not being involved in delinquent behavior. These results reflect that whether young people in hidden situation involve in delinquent behavior depends on their emp...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Conclusion: Although a cause–effect relationship cannot be firmly stated, an association between early trauma experience and cognitive impairment such as visual memory, as well as a relationship between negative symptoms and attention domains, is suggested by our preliminary findings. Future studies with larger sample sizes and prospective design will clarify the long-term effects of early exposure to trauma and its clinical meaning in terms of developing psychotic-related illness.IntroductionMore than 75% of patients with schizophrenia show some level of cognitive impairment, leading to poor functional status and im...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Authors: Baruah J, Vasudevan A Abstract The mammalian brain receives the lion's share of the body's blood supply and is a highly vascularized organ. The vascular and nervous systems arise at two distinct time points of embryogenesis; however, their functions tend to overlap or complement each other in the growth promoting milieu of the embryonic Central Nervous System (CNS). The pre-existing idea that mental disorders are a direct result from defects solely in neuronal populations and networks is gradually changing. Several studies have implicated blood vessel pathologies and blood flow changes in mental health dis...
Source: The Open Neurology Journal - Category: Neurology Tags: Open Neurol J Source Type: research
In this study, using multiple linear regression analysis, we found that decreased emotion coping appraisal of resilience in young adults was explained by an increased tendency to update beliefs about cue–outcome associative probability in a volatile environment and the increase in the parental verbal abuse experienced in early childhood. The total scores of resilience appraisals were also explained in the same manner (see Supplementary Tables 4 and 7). In addition, we did not find any effect of gender on the results both with whole subject (Figure 4) and in the gender-matched subgroup (see Supplementary Figure 3).Not...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Does Prenatal Stress Shape Postnatal Resilience? – An Epigenome-Wide Study on Violence and Mental Health in Humans Fernanda Serpeloni1,2, Karl M. Radtke1,3, Tobias Hecker4, Johanna Sill1, Vanja Vukojevic5, Simone G. de Assis2, Maggie Schauer1, Thomas Elbert1 and Daniel Nätt6* 1Clinical Psychology and Neuropsychology, Department of Psychology, University of Konstanz, Konstanz, Germany 2Department of Studies in Violence and Health Jorge Careli, National School of Public Health of Rio de Janeiro – National Institute of Women, Children and Adolescents Health Fernandes Figueira, Oswaldo Cruz Foundation, ...
Source: Frontiers in Genetics - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: research
How can conventional dietary advice gotten it so wrong? Rather than eating plenty of “healthy whole grains,” people on the Wheat Belly lifestyle eat absolutely no grains and enjoy spectacular weight loss and reversal of hundreds of health conditions as a result. Unfortunately, many people view this as a “gluten-free” lifestyle which is incorrect. Here are 10 reasons why no bagels, pretzels, or sandwiches made from wheat flour should ever cross human lips. Gliadin-derived opioid peptides (from partial digestion to 4- and 5-amino acid long fragments) increase appetite substantially–as do related...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle Gliadin gluten Inflammation Weight Loss Source Type: blogs
Abstract Citalopram (CTM), a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), has been widely used to treat panic disorders, such as depression which is one of the most disabling, yet common, psychiatric disorders. Although prenatal antidepressant exposure has a major impact on the neurobehavioral development of the offspring, such as anxiety, depression- and autism-like behaviors, the brain alterations of SSRI influence remained largely unknown. We show here, using electrophysiological recordings, that CTM exposure during the last 7 d of gestation can alter theta- and gamma-band oscillation and synchronization in t...
Source: Brain Research - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Brain Res Source Type: research
Lauren V. Riters1*, Cynthia A. Kelm-Nelson2 and Jeremy A. Spool3 1Department of Integrative Biology, University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, WI, United States 2Division of Otolaryngology-Head &Neck Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, WI, United States 3Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst, MA, United States The formation of social groups provides safety and opportunities for individuals to develop and practice important social skills. However, joining a social group does not result in any form of obvi...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
Conclusion: This case represents an example of diagnostic and therapeutic challenges of catatonic schizophrenia in high-functioning autism due to clinical and neurobiological overlaps of these conditions. We discuss clinical features together with pathophysiological concepts of both conditions. Furthermore, we tackle social and legal hurdles in Germany that naturally arise in these patients. Finally, we present diagnostic “red flags” that can be used to rationally select and conduct current recommended diagnostic assessments if there is a suspicion of ASD in patients with catatonic syndrome in order to provide ...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
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