Southern Africa: Cyclone Survivors Risk 'Second Wave' of Loss With Disease Threat

[Thomson Reuters Foundation] Nairobi -At least half a million survivors of a powerful cyclone in southeast Africa are at risk of fatal diseases, from cholera and dysentery to malaria, aid workers warned on Thursday, as rescue teams struggled to reach flood-hit communities.
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - Category: African Health Source Type: news

Related Links:

Sanofi has temporarily stopped recruiting new COVID-19 patients for two clinical trials on hydroxychloroquine and will no longer supply the anti-malaria drug to treat COVID-19 until concerns about safety are cleared up, it said on Friday.Reuters Health Information
Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines - Category: Intensive Care Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news
US hospitals said they have pulled way back on the use of hydroxychloroquine, the malaria drug touted by President Donald Trump as a COVID-19 treatment, after several studies suggested it is not effective and may pose significant risks.Reuters Health Information
Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines - Category: Intensive Care Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news
[Ghanaian Times] Wa -The AGA Mal-AngloGold Malaria Control Programme has provided a US$300,000 support package to the Upper West Region to help in the management of the Coronavirus (CODVID-19) pandemic.
Source: AllAfrica News: Malaria - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news
To the Editor I was alarmed to read the recent JAMA Internal Medicine article by Bao et al suggesting that pyrethroid insecticide exposure is associated with a 3-fold increase in the risk of adult mortality from cardiovascular disease. The significance of this finding cannot be overstated, should it be replicated and shown to be true. The world relies heavily on pyrethroids for the control of vector-borne diseases, including malaria. Huge advances have been made over the past 20 years in malaria control —we have cut transmission by about half, primarily using pyrethroid-treated mosquito nets, and prevented millions o...
Source: JAMA Internal Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Source Type: research
This study provides an approach for estimating health district-level malaria readiness indicators from survey data designed to provide regionally representative estimates. A binomial-hierarchical Bayesian spatial prediction method was applied to Burkina Faso Service Availability and Readiness Assessment (SARA) survey data to provide estimates of essential equipment availability and readiness for malaria care. Predicted values of each indicator were adjusted by the type of health facility, location, and population density. Then, a health district composite readiness profile was built via hierarchical ascendant classificatio...
Source: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research
lenburg Despite having reported one of the highest maternal mortality ratios and neonatal mortality rates in the world, surprisingly little is known about the general health status of pregnant women in rural parts of Sierra Leone. Malaria, anaemia and malnutrition are known contributors to adverse pregnancy outcomes. Although their prevalence is known to be high, the burden of these conditions in the rural pregnant population remains unknown. Our study aimed to gain more insight into the health status of pregnant women. An observational retrospective descriptive study was conducted at the Lion Heart Medical Centre usin...
Source: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research
This study shows that the magnitude of the host transcriptional response can differ markedly from related parasites with different virulence, and it enables a better understanding of the molecular interactions taking place between hosts and parasites. PMID: 32469658 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: The American Naturalist - Category: Biology Authors: Tags: Am Nat Source Type: research
IJERPH, Vol. 16, Pages 2052: Assessing Students’ Knowledge on WASH-Related Diseases International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health doi: 10.3390/ijerph16112052 Authors: Khaldoon A. Mourad Vincent Habumugisha Bolaji F. Sule Water-, sanitation-, and hygiene-related diseases are killing many people each year in developing countries, including Rwanda, and children under the age of five are the most vulnerable. This research assessed human waste disposal practices, knowledge on diseases caused by contact with human faeces, and knowledge on causes and prevention of selected WASH-related diseas...
Source: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research
Credit: BigstockBy Martin KhorPENANG, Malaysia, Dec 4 2017 (IPS)The growing crisis of antibiotic resistance is catching the attention of policy makers, but not at a rate enough to tackle it.More diseases are affected by resistance, meaning the bacteria cannot be killed even if different drugs are used on some patients, who then succumb.We are staring at a future in which antibiotics don’t work, and many of us or our children will not be saved from TB, cholera, deadly forms of dysentery, and germs contracted during surgery.Martin Khor, Executive Director of the South Centre, a think tank for developing countries, base...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Development & Aid Global Global Governance Headlines Health Poverty & SDGs Regional Categories TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news
Discussion Cholera is caused by more than 200 serogroups of Vibrio cholerae, a Gram-negative rod that is waterborne. Only two (serogroup O1 which causes about 99% of the cases, and O139) cause disease. There are biotypes of each of these serotypes. The only known hosts are humans. The organism colonizes the epithelial lining of the gut. Cholera toxin is produced by some species and if produced binds to specific receptors on host cells, activating a series of steps which cases massive loss of sodium, potassium, chloride, hydrogen carbonate, and fluids in vomitus and feces. A review of causes of diarrhea can be found here. ...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news
More News: African Health | Cholera | Dysentery | Malaria