A model for the dynamics of the parasitic stages of equine cyathostomins

Publication date: Available online 18 March 2019Source: Veterinary ParasitologyAuthor(s): Dave M. Leathwick, Christian W. Sauermann, Craig R. Reinemeyer, Martin K. NielsenAbstractA model was developed to reproduce the dynamics of the parasitic stages of equine cyathostomins. Based on a detailed review of published literature, a deterministic simulation model was constructed using the escalator box-train approach, which allows for fully-overlapping cohorts of worms and approximately normally distributed variations in age/size classes. Key biological features include a declining establishment of ingested infective stage larvae as horses age. Development rates are constant for all the parasitic stages except the encysted early third stage larvae, for which development rates are variable to reflect the sometimes extended arrestment of this stage. For these, development is slowed in the presence of adult worms in the intestinal lumen, and when ingestion of infective larvae on herbage is high or extended. In the absence of anthelmintic treatments, the life span of adult worms is approximately 12 months, and the presence of an established adult worm burden largely blocks the transition of luminal fourth stage larvae to the adult stage, resulting in mortality of the larvae. This inhibition is removed by effective anthelmintic treatment allowing the rapid replacement of adult worms from the pool of mucosal stages.Within the model, the rate and seasonality at which infective stage larv...
Source: Veterinary Parasitology - Category: Veterinary Research Source Type: research

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Source: Nursing Clinics of North America - Category: Nursing Authors: Tags: Preface Source Type: research
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Source: International Journal for Parasitology: Parasites and Wildlife - Category: Parasitology Source Type: research
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Source: Frontiers in Genetics - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: research
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Source: Frontiers in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
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